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Another way to measure the merit of the breeder you are considering buying a puppy from is, are they a member of AKC and are they a "Breeder of Merit"? AKC started a new program for breeders who are:

AKC Breeder of Merit

Requirements

  • Has a history of at least 5 years involvement with AKC events.
  • Earned at least 4 Conformation, Performance or Companion event titles on dogs they bred/co-bred.
  • Member of an AKC club.
  • Certifies that applicable health screens are performed on your breeding stock as recommended by the Parent Club.
  • Demonstrates a commitment to ensuring 100% of the puppies produced are AKC registered
There is a banner that they can acquire from AKC to post on their web sites. It isn't that easy to just become a member of this program. You have to be a participating person in AKC events. For conformation the breeder has to have finished 4 dogs that they bred or co-bred. In Maltese with their coat that is not an easy to do thing.
So, with this in mind, it is a way to help decide if the breeder is reputable or not. Of coarse there are bad apples in every program, but it is a thought. JMO
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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Another way to measure the merit of the breeder you are considering buying a puppy from is, are they a member of AKC and are they a "Breeder of Merit"? AKC started a new program for breeders who are:

AKC Breeder of Merit

Requirements

  • Has a history of at least 5 years involvement with AKC events.
  • Earned at least 4 Conformation, Performance or Companion event titles on dogs they bred/co-bred.
  • Member of an AKC club.
  • Certifies that applicable health screens are performed on your breeding stock as recommended by the Parent Club.
  • Demonstrates a commitment to ensuring 100% of the puppies produced are AKC registered
There is a banner that they can acquire from AKC to post on their web sites. It isn't that easy to just become a member of this program. You have to be a participating person in AKC events. For conformation the breeder has to have finished 4 dogs that they bred or co-bred. In Maltese with their coat that is not an easy to do thing.
So, with this in mind, it is a way to help decide if the breeder is reputable or not. Of coarse there are bad apples in every program, but it is a thought. JMO

I believe this is a good program. However, some show breeders (good people) remain on the fence until I believe they see it deployed by AKC. There is discussion about whether this is another opportunity for AKC to simply increase revenue streams. I believe over time, however, more good/reputable show breeders will enroll.

I just received my letter from AKC stating to please enroll as I have already qualified. What is very cool about the program is in my opinion AKC has listened to the pleas of the good show breeders wanting AKC to create a distinguishing method of helping potential adoptive puppy families to understand there is a clear difference between breeders who make every effort to show and have their dogs evaluated by licensed AKC judges vs. those who can simply register with AKC because they acquired two dogs with breeding rights. I also believe it helps AKC because the Breeder of Merit participants commit to encouraging their puppy families to register their puppies with AKC and there are some further elements around that - so, this of course assists AKC in increasing their registration fees - it is a mutually beneficial program for both parties.

Heidi
Aria Maltese
 

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Tina, Thanks for sharing the details about this new program. It is another tool in the kit that can help buyers look for a means of distinguishing breeders.

I believe this is a good program. However, some show breeders (good people) remain on the fence until I believe they see it deployed by AKC. There is discussion about whether this is another opportunity for AKC to simply increase revenue streams. I believe over time, however, more good/reputable show breeders will enroll.

I just received my letter from AKC stating to please enroll as I have already qualified. What is very cool about the program is in my opinion AKC has listened to the pleas of the good show breeders wanting AKC to create a distinguishing method of helping potential adoptive puppy families to understand there is a clear difference between breeders who make every effort to show and have their dogs evaluated by licensed AKC judges vs. those who can simply register with AKC because they acquired two dogs with breeding rights. I also believe it helps AKC because the Breeder of Merit participants commit to encouraging their puppy families to register their puppies with AKC and there are some further elements around that - so, this of course assists AKC in increasing their registration fees - it is a mutually beneficial program for both parties.

Heidi
Aria Maltese
I agree Heidi that this is a good program. I do hope that dedicated show breeders will take part.

As far as AKC trying to increase their registration fees, I feel like people can sometimes be overly cynical about this. AKC is a registry. That is their mission/purpose. But a few years back they tried to make their registry more responsible by putting in a few mechanisms that would weed out undesirable breeders. One way they did this by instituting DNA requirements. In the end, this lead to a lot of BYB and Mill dogs switching over to alternative registries. Of course, this is a good thing, but AKC has lost a lot of registrations in the process. To me "the breeder of merit" program encouraging dedicated show breeders to increase their AKC registrations is a win/win for both the dedicated breeders and the AKC. It makes the AKC name more synonymous with responsible breeding programs while at the same time offering them a chance of increasing registrations of dogs with proven quality. In the end, if AKC continues in this direction, we may see that having AKC papers does have a real meaning; dogs with AKC papers will actually be better representations of the breed.
 

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Tina, Thanks for sharing the details about this new program. It is another tool in the kit that can help buyers look for a means of distinguishing breeders.



I agree Heidi that this is a good program. I do hope that dedicated show breeders will take part.

As far as AKC trying to increase their registration fees, I feel like people can sometimes be overly cynical about this. AKC is a registry. That is their mission/purpose. But a few years back they tried to make their registry more responsible by putting in a few mechanisms that would weed out undesirable breeders. One way they did this by instituting DNA requirements. In the end, this lead to a lot of BYB and Mill dogs switching over to alternative registries. Of course, this is a good thing, but AKC has lost a lot of registrations in the process. To me "the breeder of merit" program encouraging dedicated show breeders to increase their AKC registrations is a win/win for both the dedicated breeders and the AKC. It makes the AKC name more synonymous with responsible breeding programs while at the same time offering them a chance of increasing registrations of dogs with proven quality. In the end, if AKC continues in this direction, we may see that having AKC papers does have a real meaning; dogs with AKC papers will actually be better representations of the breed.
I agree, Carina - I see it as mutually beneficial and again believe it is very good there will be further delineation between those that just breed to breed vs. those that make a concerted effort to actually better the breed.

Heidi
Aria Maltese
 

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I was thinking when I saw this post yesterday, how it's similar to the Canadian Kennel Club requirements to apply for a permanent kennel name. This is copied from the registration form for that:

In order to apply for Permanent Kennel Name Registration, the following conditions must be met:
1. CKC Membership has been maintained for a minimum period of ten (10) consecutive years.
2. The applicant(s) has bred purebred dogs for a minimum of ten (10) years.
3. The applicant(s) has never been subjected to disciplinary action by the Canadian Kennel Club.
4. The applicant(s) has owned and/or bred not less than five (5) dogs registered individually in the Club’s records, to each of which the CKC has granted a title.
5. The registered name of each of the dogs referred to below includes, as part of its registered name, the kennel name for which permanent registration is being applied for
Sadly, there's no mention of health screening at all.


Just curious, how would the AKC evaluate a breeder on their last requirement: "Demonstrates a commitment to ensuring 100% of the puppies produced are AKC registered"

Would it simply mean that the breeder was never caught selling unregistered dogs or is there more to it?
 

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Tina -- thanks for alerting everyone to this. Also, Heidi and Carina -- I agree with both of you. If I was still breeding (Lhasas), I would definitely join.
 

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I was thinking when I saw this post yesterday, how it's similar to the Canadian Kennel Club requirements to apply for a permanent kennel name. This is copied from the registration form for that:



Sadly, there's no mention of health screening at all.


Just curious, how would the AKC evaluate a breeder on their last requirement: "Demonstrates a commitment to ensuring 100% of the puppies produced are AKC registered"

Would it simply mean that the breeder was never caught selling unregistered dogs or is there more to it?
AKC can inspect any breeder at any time and request to see their system of records with respect to any dog registered with AKC. AKC requires records include a Litter Record - which, captures in hand written form the (amongst other things) name of dogs bred, resulting number of puppies and where each puppy was placed with name and contact information for those puppy families. AKC is very serious about accurate record keeping. I have been inspected once (last year) - and was excited for the Inspector to see my babies, but anxious about were all my records up to date and satisfactory per AKC's requirements - they were and happily the inspection was actually fun -- sounds weird, but it was because I was actually proud to show my meticulously kept records and although I digress, my point to this is they can track you are registering the litters or demonstrating a commitment to do so based on how accurately your records (when inspected) meet their standards/requirements.

If a Breeder commits to this program they are in effect signing an attestation stating they will make every effort and be prepared to demonstrate how they are ensuring all puppies bred by them are in fact AKC registered.

Hope that helps.

Heidi
Aria Maltese
 

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Thanks a bunch for the info. I thought it was maybe a weak point, but if the frequency of inspections is high enough, then it sounds like yet another great requirement.

I hope the CKC adopts a program like this... the permanent kennel name requirements only get them about halfway there I guess. :blush:
 

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Although being a Breeder of Merit could be one of the criteria when looking for a breeder I don't think others should be discarded automatically if they are not. I agree with Heidi and Carina, it looks like it is a good program and although I have been invited to join it, I haven't yet. I am still apprehensive about some of its points and would like more info about it before I would feel comfortable moving forward with it. I know other great breeders who feel the same way.
 

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Although being a Breeder of Merit could be one of the criteria when looking for a breeder I don't think others should be discarded automatically if they are not. I agree with Heidi and Carina, it looks like it is a good program and although I have been invited to join it, I haven't yet. I am still apprehensive about some of its points and would like more info about it before I would feel comfortable moving forward with it. I know other great breeders who feel the same way.
Hi Josy.

Yes -- I know there are folks still apprehensive as the program is not fully deployed at this time from a let's see how it is actually implemented perspective. I also agree with you that simply because a Breeder chooses not to join should not equate to that person some how being "discarded". I have decided to join because I believe at this point it does support the distinction of BYB with registration rights to AKC v. reputable show breeder with registration rights to AKC. I think this is a good thing overall, so I am supporting it primarily because of this.

We will see soon, I suppose how it is actually implemented.

Heidi
Aria Maltese

p.s. Give Chloe a kiss from us - still waiting on an update from Tiger -- :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I agree it shouldn't be the only thing to make your decision on buying from a breeder, it does show that the breeder is participating in a program that shows they are dedicated to the sport of pure bred dogs. A lot of breeders feel that AKC gets into their business too much and this would open the breeder up to being even more scrutinized by them. This is where other registries have come into the making. I am probably wrong, but when AKC made it mandatory to DNA males after so many breedings, quite a few breeders stopped registering their dogs with AKC and went with other registries. (ACA, APRI etc.)
I did an experiment a while back. I registered 5 of my dogs with ACA. I have never heard a word from them since. I register my dogs and puppies with AKC. I have been inspected by AKC 3 times in the 10 years I've been breeding. At least AKC is paying attention and regulates breeders. JMO
 

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Rheagar's breeder, Windrock Sighthounds, is on the breeder of merit list.

I don't necessarily want things to be black and white, but I have been told by so many people whom I believe to be reputable breeders to watch out for anyone on the USDA list, anyone who won't let you see their adult dogs or where the dogs are kept, anyone who doesn't register with AKC, anyone who doesn't show their dogs to championships, anyone who doesn't health check their dogs, etc. that it is a little hard to let that go. However, I have been to some dog shows and I couldn't believe how some people treated their dogs. I know some people who "claim" that they health check, and there are some people who can talk a really good talk.

I almost paid big money for a greyhound when I found out, through gossip, that the breeder had let one of her older dogs die by leaving it out in the Texas heat with no shade or water on concrete. When I asked her about it, she said it was an accident. If I hadn't just happened to hear this story, I would have paid her a lot of money because she had a brilliant line.

I guess my problem is, now there is just TOO much gray area. You can't necessarily trust "reputable" breeders and you can't trust the USDA list, and if you aren't a private detective, then you 'may' buy from someone who isn't reputable.
 

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Isn't most of life about "gray area"? I think about some of the decisions humans make ... buying a house, choosing a college, marrying the person who we assume we will grow old with. Huge decisions with no black and white answers. And, OMG, how many times we've read in the paper or heard on the news that a child got left in a car or on a schoolbus with a tragic ending. Accidents do happen. There are some absolutes. AKC registration. A pedigree with some champions in the first couple of generations. Actual results from health screenings done on a dog who is of a breed with a known health issue. But from beginning to end there are no easy answers, no absolute right or wrong way to make a choice or a decision. I know this doesn't help except to encourage people to keep an open mind as well as open eyes and think and learn and pray and trust their own instincts.
 

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You are right, there are no absolutes, and unfortunately a lot of the time we learn from making mistakes. I just wish there was some all fired way that we could make 'sure' we weren't buying from someone who only sees his/her dogs as a cash crop. Of course this is asking for perfection in an area, and that isn't possible. It is just so frustrating though!
 
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