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My Dolcina:tender: has been gaining weight: she should be around 4.0lbs, but her weight is now 7.4.

As you may remember, she was diagnosed with thyroid and was put on medication couple of months ago.

We had a blood test taken yesterday and the result was alarming:unsure:: her Triglyceride jumped to 2604, yes a scary 2604 (normal is 29-291).

My Vet asked me to bring all foods and treat which I am giving to her.

When I showed him the jar of the coconut butter (organic coconut butter 18gr of fat, 16gr sat fat) which is part of her diet, he immediately pointed at that as the cause of the elevated Triglyceride.

I just now finished surfing the SM threads where so many members are raving about feeding their fluffs coconut oil.

Is coconut oil different from coconut butter? :blush:

If coconut oil and coconut butter are the same, how come those who give it to their fluffs have not experienced any such problem?

I am glad to say though that her T4 test came out with flying colors:aktion033: thanks to the soloxine she is on.
 

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wow!! Those numbers are dangerously high. I actually stopped giving coconut oil as I've read some conflicting articles and until more research is done, I personally don't feel comfortable ingesting it (for me or my dog). That's wholly my personal opinion though. (I still use it as a moisturizer from time to time and as a hair mask).

Personally I would heed your Vet's advice though if he pointed out that as the reason for her high numbers.
 

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My Quincy was on Evo small bites ( which is a high-rated food) and i had even considered having naddie switched over to it. However we had some pre-dental blood work done and found his blood work showed very high triglycerides ( though not as high as Dolcina's) . Protein and a few other elevations were present as well.
Our vet, too wanted to know what her diet was. I was told to take him off immediately ... it had too high fat content! What really scared me was the vet saw that some fatty deposits had started to form in his eyes! I hadn't noticed them!!! and in fact she had to point them out to me. I was told we couldn't reverse but the goal was to prevent any more progression.
I was told to put him on the lowest fat food I could find so I ended up with the Chicken Soup for Dog Lovers Soul . I do add a bit of the Prescription WD to help with his colitis ( for the high-fiber in that) .
Last blood panel showed the triglycerides cut in half and other things went to normal. (WHEW! ) He's due for another panel in a few months so hoping even the triglycerides will have improved further. Also since vet keeps a close look at his eyes and there has been no progression of the fatty deposits!! ( YEAH!!!)
Good you got the panel done and now can work at getting those triglyceride numbers down! Goes to show how important these blood panels are!! They reveal so much of what's happening 'behind the scene" !
 

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Unfortunately on forums .. all, no matter what the topic .. people tend to behave in a herd mentality. One person raves about something and everyone jumps on it ... whether it is a food supplement or a breeder or a color for a purse or whatever .. These ideas seem to take on a life of their own and everyone follows the ideas promoted.

I suggest that rather than making a diet change based on something a member has raved about, I would do further research and also consult your veterinarian, especially when you start messing with fat and protein, etc.

I'm glad you caught this and I bet you'll find her numbers will go down when you remove this extra fat from her diet.
 

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Oh no! I hope Dolcina's numbers come down with the diet change! I used to add a tiny amount of coconut oil in our home cooking, but noticed that my fluffs seemed to feel the best on a pretty low-fat diet.

I wonder if coconut chips may not be such a great snack either then... ? They are really popular in the dog world right now!!
 

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Unfortunately on forums .. all, no matter what the topic .. people tend to behave in a herd mentality. One person raves about something and everyone jumps on it ... whether it is a food supplement or a breeder or a color for a purse or whatever .. These ideas seem to take on a life of their own and everyone follows the ideas promoted.

I suggest that rather than making a diet change based on something a member has raved about, I would do further research and also consult your veterinarian, especially when you start messing with fat and protein, etc.

I'm glad you caught this and I bet you'll find her numbers will go down when you remove this extra fat from her diet.

:goodpost: Great advice!

Allie
 

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Unfortunately on forums .. all, no matter what the topic .. people tend to behave in a herd mentality. One person raves about something and everyone jumps on it ... whether it is a food supplement or a breeder or a color for a purse or whatever .. These ideas seem to take on a life of their own and everyone follows the ideas promoted.

I suggest that rather than making a diet change based on something a member has raved about, I would do further research and also consult your veterinarian, especially when you start messing with fat and protein, etc.

I'm glad you caught this and I bet you'll find her numbers will go down when you remove this extra fat from her diet.
:goodpost:
 

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Unfortunately on forums .. all, no matter what the topic .. people tend to behave in a herd mentality. One person raves about something and everyone jumps on it ... whether it is a food supplement or a breeder or a color for a purse or whatever .. These ideas seem to take on a life of their own and everyone follows the ideas promoted.

I suggest that rather than making a diet change based on something a member has raved about, I would do further research and also consult your veterinarian, especially when you start messing with fat and protein, etc.

I'm glad you caught this and I bet you'll find her numbers will go down when you remove this extra fat from her diet.
:goodpost: I couldn't agree more. It's always best to consult your vet or, if you homecook, a canine nutritionist.

I am so glad you had bloodwork done!
 

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I have been feeding Nikki (and now Keiko) coconut oil, and real butter daily, plus whole eggs 2X a week for two years. Nikki (and now Keiko) has not had one health issue.

Since I took Nikki off grains
after she was spayed, she has had perfect blood work every time, despite her MVD, and her weight is perfect.

Added: I have used the services of 3 different vets (2 conventional, 1 holistic) and 1 veterinary internist since I started home cooking. All of them told me to continue feeding Nikki exactly the same way I've been feeding her since she was 9 months old, because it has resulted in exceptional health.

When grains were virtually eliminated and coconut oil was added to our diet several years ago, triglycerides rose temporarily, then leveled off, while HDL (good Cholesterol) rose significantly, and has stayed that way for a few years now.
 

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Maltese owners are free to feed their dogs whatever they want, and should not blindly take advice from any online forums, but do their own research first and make their own decisions.

Each dog is an individual and generalizations about what is good or bad for all Maltese might not be right for your dog. We all have our own experiences, and we try to help one another as a result of the outcome of those experiences, but choices in a dog's food and health treatment is ultimately the individual owner's responsibility.
 

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Maltese owners are free to feed their dogs whatever they want, and should not blindly take advice from any online forums, but do their own research first and make their own decisions.

Each dog is an individual and generalizations about what is right for all Maltese and their owners is not the best way to go. We all have our own experiences, and we try to help one another as a result of the outcome of those experiences, but choices in a dog's food and health treatment is ultimately the individual owner's responsibility.

:goodpost:
 

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I'm so sorry to hear Dolcina is having health issues!!! Just follow the advice of your vet and hopefully she will be back to her normal slim self soon. Preston sends kisses.
 

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You don't say what else is in the diet you feed her besides the coconut butter.
The only fat Alex gets is from the regular butter I use to cook his steaks with. And a lot of times his steaks are cooked on the BBQ without any fat at all. The rice and veggies are steamed. The steaks are eye of round, very lean meat. When he gets chicken, it's mostly cornish hen from the rotisserie.
 

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Maltese owners are free to feed their dogs whatever they want, and should not blindly take advice from any online forums, but do their own research first and make their own decisions.

Each dog is an individual and generalizations about what is good or bad for all Maltese might not be right for your dog. We all have our own experiences, and we try to help one another as a result of the outcome of those experiences, but choices in a dog's food and health treatment is ultimately the individual owner's responsibility.

:goodpost:
 

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I think that just like humans, we can't generalize about our fluffs' diets. They don't all react the same to food.

For example, Lacie doesn't do well with beef or with grain, but neither seem to be problem for Tilly. Lacie does exceptionally well on a raw diet, but Tilly gets nauseaous after 1 bite.

Bloodwork is very important and your Vet and/or a canine nutrionalist are very important in providing a perfect diet that will be right for each fluff. :)
 

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I can totally believe that Piccolina might have gotten high triglycerides from coconut oil/butter. And I can totally believe that Nikki and Keiko might be better off from it. Each dog is totally individual. There is no one "best" way. There is not one universal truth to almost any topic.

I am always asking my vet and researching nutrition. Yet the research and the questions have led me to very different conclusions for each dog. We want to believe sometimes (maybe for the sake of simplicity), that there is a black and a white. But in my experience, there isn't.

I feed Casanova and Bijou totally different things to try to help them feel their best. Casanova does best on wild fish, very lean meats, and loves veggies. He craps out from any fat that is not from wild fish, especially beef no matter how lean the cut. On the other hand, Bijou seems to "starve" on a low-fat diet, hates fish, does great on beef, won't eat undisguised veggies. Additionally, Casanova does very poorly on kibbles, while Bijou seems perfectly healthy while nibbling happily all day long on kibbles. Bijou cannot eat grains, or she gets tear stains. Casanova NEEDS to eat rice in the morning, or his stomach seems to overproduce acid. (The good thing is Casanova doesn't seem to get tear stains no matter what he eats.) Even the required frequency of feeding differs. When I first joined this forum, I used "tough love" on the advice of others, and tried to MAKE Casanova eat kibble. He starved himself, and lost .5 pounds in a few months. People said dogs only have to eat twice a day. Well, I can believe that because Bijou can even eat only once a day, but Casanova does best when he eats every six hours.

I can go on and on, but my point is despite all the research and conversations with my vet, I feed each pet what they individually have "told" me they need. I am quite comfortable knowing that there is not ONE truth for any topic, but I do try to "listen" very carefully to what my pet is telling me by whether or not they get sick, their energy level, their bloodwork, their skin and coat condition. The best we can do is consult our vets, run periodic blood work, do our research, observe how well our pets do based on our best guess, and modify our action plan based on how they do. I couldn't get two dogs that were more dissimilar than Casanova and Bijou in terms of what they need, and I am happy to cook separate meals for them and feed them differently. High protein is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Some amount of fat is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Grains are NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it good for most dogs. (In fact, rice has greatly benefited Casanova's sensitive stomach.)

If you ask ten people, you will get ten different opinions. The most important thing, in my opinion, is to keep observing each pet's health, keep checking the blood, keep talking and asking questions to the vet, keep doing the research, and keep being open to changing your action plan. Even if something works for your pet now, it may not work next year, and no one can afford to be inflexible in their thinking when their pet's health is at stake. If you find that you don't respect your vet's opinion, or they are not helpful, please keep looking for one that you are thrilled about. Don't give up looking for a great vet because my life greatly improved when I found a fantastic one!

One last thing is (this is what my vet emphasizes), if you home cook, you must add calcium back to the meal. She says this is the important thing that is overlooked in home cooking.
 

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I can totally believe that Piccolina might have gotten high triglycerides from coconut oil/butter. And I can totally believe that Nikki and Keiko might be better off from it. Each dog is totally individual. There is no one "best" way. There is not one universal truth to almost any topic.

I am always asking my vet and researching nutrition. Yet the research and the questions have led me to very different conclusions for each dog. We want to believe sometimes (maybe for the sake of simplicity), that there is a black and a white. But in my experience, there isn't.

I feed Casanova and Bijou totally different things to try to help them feel their best. Casanova does best on wild fish, very lean meats, and loves veggies. He craps out from any fat that is not from wild fish, especially beef no matter how lean the cut. On the other hand, Bijou seems to "starve" on a low-fat diet, hates fish, does great on beef, won't eat undisguised veggies. Additionally, Casanova does very poorly on kibbles, while Bijou seems perfectly healthy while nibbling happily all day long on kibbles. Bijou cannot eat grains, or she gets tear stains. Casanova NEEDS to eat rice in the morning, or his stomach seems to overproduce acid. (The good thing is Casanova doesn't seem to get tear stains no matter what he eats.) Even the required frequency of feeding differs. When I first joined this forum, I used "tough love" on the advice of others, and tried to MAKE Casanova eat kibble. He starved himself, and lost .5 pounds in a few months. People said dogs only have to eat twice a day. Well, I can believe that because Bijou can even eat only once a day, but Casanova does best when he eats every six hours.

I can go on and on, but my point is despite all the research and conversations with my vet, I feed each pet what they individually have "told" me they need. I am quite comfortable knowing that there is not ONE truth for any topic, but I do try to "listen" very carefully to what my pet is telling me by whether or not they get sick, their energy level, their bloodwork, their skin and coat condition. The best we can do is consult our vets, run periodic blood work, do our research, observe how well our pets do based on our best guess, and modify our action plan based on how they do. I couldn't get two dogs that were more dissimilar than Casanova and Bijou in terms of what they need, and I am happy to cook separate meals for them and feed them differently. High protein is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Some amount of fat is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Grains are NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it good for most dogs. (In fact, rice has greatly benefited Casanova's sensitive stomach.)

If you ask ten people, you will get ten different opinions. The most important thing, in my opinion, is to keep observing each pet's health, keep checking the blood, keep talking and asking questions to the vet, keep doing the research, and keep being open to changing your action plan. Even if something works for your pet now, it may not work next year, and no one can afford to be inflexible in their thinking when their pet's health is at stake. If you find that you don't respect your vet's opinion, or they are not helpful, please keep looking for one that you are thrilled about. Don't give up looking for a great vet because my life greatly improved when I found a fantastic one!

One last thing is (this is what my vet emphasizes), if you home cook, you must add calcium back to the meal. She says this is the important thing that is overlooked in home cooking.
:goodpost: I think this goes for people as well as our pets, as well and to me moderation is the key as well to health for all.
 

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I can totally believe that Piccolina might have gotten high triglycerides from coconut oil/butter. And I can totally believe that Nikki and Keiko might be better off from it. Each dog is totally individual. There is no one "best" way. There is not one universal truth to almost any topic.

I am always asking my vet and researching nutrition. Yet the research and the questions have led me to very different conclusions for each dog. We want to believe sometimes (maybe for the sake of simplicity), that there is a black and a white. But in my experience, there isn't.

I feed Casanova and Bijou totally different things to try to help them feel their best. Casanova does best on wild fish, very lean meats, and loves veggies. He craps out from any fat that is not from wild fish, especially beef no matter how lean the cut. On the other hand, Bijou seems to "starve" on a low-fat diet, hates fish, does great on beef, won't eat undisguised veggies. Additionally, Casanova does very poorly on kibbles, while Bijou seems perfectly healthy while nibbling happily all day long on kibbles. Bijou cannot eat grains, or she gets tear stains. Casanova NEEDS to eat rice in the morning, or his stomach seems to overproduce acid. (The good thing is Casanova doesn't seem to get tear stains no matter what he eats.) Even the required frequency of feeding differs. When I first joined this forum, I used "tough love" on the advice of others, and tried to MAKE Casanova eat kibble. He starved himself, and lost .5 pounds in a few months. People said dogs only have to eat twice a day. Well, I can believe that because Bijou can even eat only once a day, but Casanova does best when he eats every six hours.

I can go on and on, but my point is despite all the research and conversations with my vet, I feed each pet what they individually have "told" me they need. I am quite comfortable knowing that there is not ONE truth for any topic, but I do try to "listen" very carefully to what my pet is telling me by whether or not they get sick, their energy level, their bloodwork, their skin and coat condition. The best we can do is consult our vets, run periodic blood work, do our research, observe how well our pets do based on our best guess, and modify our action plan based on how they do. I couldn't get two dogs that were more dissimilar than Casanova and Bijou in terms of what they need, and I am happy to cook separate meals for them and feed them differently. High protein is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Some amount of fat is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Grains are NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it good for most dogs. (In fact, rice has greatly benefited Casanova's sensitive stomach.)

If you ask ten people, you will get ten different opinions. The most important thing, in my opinion, is to keep observing each pet's health, keep checking the blood, keep talking and asking questions to the vet, keep doing the research, and keep being open to changing your action plan. Even if something works for your pet now, it may not work next year, and no one can afford to be inflexible in their thinking when their pet's health is at stake. If you find that you don't respect your vet's opinion, or they are not helpful, please keep looking for one that you are thrilled about. Don't give up looking for a great vet because my life greatly improved when I found a fantastic one!

One last thing is (this is what my vet emphasizes), if you home cook, you must add calcium back to the meal. She says this is the important thing that is overlooked in home cooking.

:goodpost:
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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I can totally believe that Piccolina might have gotten high triglycerides from coconut oil/butter. And I can totally believe that Nikki and Keiko might be better off from it. Each dog is totally individual. There is no one "best" way. There is not one universal truth to almost any topic.

I am always asking my vet and researching nutrition. Yet the research and the questions have led me to very different conclusions for each dog. We want to believe sometimes (maybe for the sake of simplicity), that there is a black and a white. But in my experience, there isn't.

I feed Casanova and Bijou totally different things to try to help them feel their best. Casanova does best on wild fish, very lean meats, and loves veggies. He craps out from any fat that is not from wild fish, especially beef no matter how lean the cut. On the other hand, Bijou seems to "starve" on a low-fat diet, hates fish, does great on beef, won't eat undisguised veggies. Additionally, Casanova does very poorly on kibbles, while Bijou seems perfectly healthy while nibbling happily all day long on kibbles. Bijou cannot eat grains, or she gets tear stains. Casanova NEEDS to eat rice in the morning, or his stomach seems to overproduce acid. (The good thing is Casanova doesn't seem to get tear stains no matter what he eats.) Even the required frequency of feeding differs. When I first joined this forum, I used "tough love" on the advice of others, and tried to MAKE Casanova eat kibble. He starved himself, and lost .5 pounds in a few months. People said dogs only have to eat twice a day. Well, I can believe that because Bijou can even eat only once a day, but Casanova does best when he eats every six hours.

I can go on and on, but my point is despite all the research and conversations with my vet, I feed each pet what they individually have "told" me they need. I am quite comfortable knowing that there is not ONE truth for any topic, but I do try to "listen" very carefully to what my pet is telling me by whether or not they get sick, their energy level, their bloodwork, their skin and coat condition. The best we can do is consult our vets, run periodic blood work, do our research, observe how well our pets do based on our best guess, and modify our action plan based on how they do. I couldn't get two dogs that were more dissimilar than Casanova and Bijou in terms of what they need, and I am happy to cook separate meals for them and feed them differently. High protein is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Some amount of fat is NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it appropriate for all dogs. Grains are NOT evil for all dogs, nor is it good for most dogs. (In fact, rice has greatly benefited Casanova's sensitive stomach.)

If you ask ten people, you will get ten different opinions. The most important thing, in my opinion, is to keep observing each pet's health, keep checking the blood, keep talking and asking questions to the vet, keep doing the research, and keep being open to changing your action plan. Even if something works for your pet now, it may not work next year, and no one can afford to be inflexible in their thinking when their pet's health is at stake. If you find that you don't respect your vet's opinion, or they are not helpful, please keep looking for one that you are thrilled about. Don't give up looking for a great vet because my life greatly improved when I found a fantastic one!

One last thing is (this is what my vet emphasizes), if you home cook, you must add calcium back to the meal. She says this is the important thing that is overlooked in home cooking.








:goodpost: :aktion033::aktion033: I totally agree!!!!
 
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