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Hi All.......don't know if I put this on the right part of the board! I'm guessing it is at least "training" related. I am looking for a breeder that I can get my next dog from. I'm in no hurry because although Frosty is having some health concerns at 13, he could be with us for some time. Ideally I would want to get a baby before he has passed, hoping that would help me deal with his passing
(Maybe!?) He is alpha besides being senior, (grumpy) and has never liked dogs. He doesn't realize he IS one! He is an only "child". He is snarky when bothered when he wants to be left alone, and would come up snapping if suddenly bounced on when sleeping. It's not that I think he would constantly try to kill a pup. I'm sure it wouldn't be that bad, but I can see a puppy who didn't mind his manners getting snapped.

Now that I've started looking for a breeder that I could get a puppy from, I'm nervous.......what if I find one and fall helplessly in love with a baby! I have the baby's best interest at heart, but may not want to chance loosing it. Frosty could be with us a few days or a few years. Do you think it is possible to bring a baby into the house with Frosty? I've never had 2 dogs. I've introduced kittens into a household with an adult dog with no problem, once they understood it was our baby and was to be loved, they did. But I'm afraid dog/dog would be a different story, at least for Frosty. What do you think? I want to be prepared to find a new puppy, but don't want to cause it a problem by getting it too soon.
 

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Hmmm...that's really a tough one.

Our older senior (who passed away last summer) just loved puppies. She was an alpha.

Our other senior, Ozzy, (a little slow, weird, grumpy, autistic, but sweet) hated puppies, but is submissive, not an alpha.

When we introduced Sylphide, our alpha took her under her wing and kept Ozzy away from her. Gradually, they became buddies, and eventually, very close when April passed away. Sylphide (joyfully, because she so wanted to be the boss) became the new alpha.

When we introduced Shrek three weeks ago, I expected Ozzy to be grumpy with him and seek isolation, but it hasn't been like that at all. Ozzy accepted him immediately and they are good buddies.

It's really hard to tell in advance how they will react. In Ozzy's case, having the puppies around has really brought him out of his shell. He used to lie around on his bed a lot and didn't participate in family life much. Now, he just enjoys being at the center of things with the pups and follows them around. He even jumps in to play now and then.
 

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My Snowflake was 15 when we brought Flurry home. She had been sleeping with the cats in the back yard and she never was crazy about the cats. She was so happy when Flurry came back into the picture but I was worried. Sassy was welcomed with licks and wags too. Dogs usually like company or a little pack.
 

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Originally posted by SylphidesMom@Mar 20 2005, 02:27 PM
Hmmm...that's really a tough one.

Our older senior (who passed away last summer) just loved puppies.  She was an alpha.

Our other senior, Ozzy, (a little slow, weird, grumpy, autistic, but sweet) hated puppies, but is submissive, not an alpha.

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Dogs can be autistic?
How is that diagnosed?
What would be the signs/symptoms? Hate to change the topic of the thread in mid-stream...but that really intrigued me!
 

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I would seriously consider how adding a puppy would affect Frosty's quality of life. I've thought about a number of adult rescue dogs, but when I meet them my only thought is will this dog do well with Mikey or will it stress him out. I will not compromise on Mikey being comfortable due to his health.

You might consider borrowing an adult dog from somebody for a weekend to see how it goes. Certainly with a new pup it takes about a month for everyone to adjust, but borrowing a dog might help give you an idea of how feasable it is with Frosty. I would not committ to or bring a puppy home if you have doubts. Be proactive in visiting other dogs and seeing how Frosty does with them before deciding.

You can always find a breeder now and tell them you want to wait a few years for a pup. When I decided on a breeder last time, I told them I would be ready any time a year away and was happy to wait for the right pup. It gave us more time to get to know each other and I was much happier having the pup at a time when it was best for me.
 

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I don't mean to trivialize your situation by saying the same thing happened to me....

When my first Maltese, Rosebud, was about 12 and not in good health I was thinking just like you.... that getting another Malt would help me get over Rosebud when she was gone. She had always been an only dog and did not particularly care for other dogs... she'd get very bent out of shape even if someone brought their dog over here.

So after thinking about it I realized that she deserved her last months to be as stress free as possible. The thought of a young, healthy puppy was attractive to me after living with a sick dog for so long but I realized it was absolutely not fair to Rosebud to bring a puppy in to our home.

I think it is OK to look for a breeder now so you'll be all set when the time comes but it might be better to wait... and yes... if you look at puppies you will fall in love and then be conflicted even more!
 

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One of my favorite vets gave me this bit of invalubale advice many years ago. He said that another dog should always be added before the first dog is 5 or 6 years old. After that, he said, it isn't fair to the older dog who should be allowed to enjoy his senior years with the "status quo" and not have to adjust to a new puppy.

Puppies have boundless energy and constantly want to play like they do with their littermates - chew, "attack", etc. It would be too stressful for your Frosty, in my opinion.

Let your Frosty live out the rest of his days as he has done all his life. Getting another puppy now will not help with losing him when that time comes. Treasure his golden years because they are limited and make them as wonderful as possible - Frosty deserves it. Then, when he is gone, get a puppy to build new memories.
 
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