Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
841 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys

Summer has been chewing her feet almost from day one . Vet said was prombly allergy , said would cost 200.00 to test . A friend said to try this. Apple cider vinegar and alchol equal parts rinse paws. She said, it works great on her pup and last a long time . Has anyone else heard any thing like this..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
I've never heard of the vinegar/alcohol thing, but Peanut used to chew his paws like crazy. His was a food allergy. I didn't do the tests, the vet just suggested a possible food allergy one time and after a process of elimination she decided it was probably corn. I switched him to a food without corn and I haven't seen him bite his feet since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Sir N used to have very brown feet. He chewed them night and day. The vet was positive it was an allergy, but we couldn't figure out what kind of an allergy. Then, I finally figured it out--he's allergic to grass. This is one of the reasons that he gets his feet shampooed after every walk. It was after I started washing his feet after every walk that the brown went away and he stopped chewing. Depending on how much time I have for walks and the weather, that sometimes means he gets his feet shampooed three times a day.

Little C started chewing on her feet a couple of weeks ago. With her, it's dry air. I had stopped using my humidifier because I felt like the air wasn't so dry anymore. After the vet told me that she needed more moisture in the air, I started using it again. Problem went away.

I'm considering getting them both tested for food allergies just so I KNOW what I shouldn't give them. I don't think that they are allergic to anything that I have given them, but I'd like to not EVER give them something that they are allergic to and we are experimenting more and more with what they like to eat. Of course, if I do this, the vet is going to think I'm nuts. Ah, who cares? He probably already does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
What do you feed Summer? The top three allergens for dogs are wheat, corn and soy products. Unfortunately, a lot of the commerical foods, especially the less expensive ones, are full of them.

You can try eliminating those 3 thing and see what happens. Sometimes dogs become allergic to the protien source. I know many people who have switched their allergic dogs to a duck and potato formula with great results.

Another thing to try is adding a fish oil supplement. My Lady is very allergic and my vet had me add fish oil to boost her immune system. (I get the 3V caps for small dogs). This has made a terrific difference. This time of the year in North Carolina is awful with the pollen. Everything is coated with a yellow-green powder. Lady is usually miserable and her blood sugar goes sky high (she's a diabetic) from the stress to her body. She has to be on a full dose of steriods.

This year she has been amazingly better. Normal blood sugar, no coughing and runny eyes. I'm a believer in fish oil now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
841 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Originally posted by LadysMom@Apr 14 2005, 05:58 AM
What do you feed Summer? The top three allergens for dogs are wheat, corn and soy products. Unfortunately, a lot of the commerical foods, especially the less expensive ones, are full of them.

You can try eliminating those 3 thing and see what happens. Sometimes dogs become allergic to the protien source. I know many people who have switched their allergic dogs to a duck and potato formula with great results.

Another thing to try is adding a fish oil supplement. My Lady is very allergic and my vet had me add fish oil to boost her immune system. (I get the 3V caps for small dogs). This has made a terrific difference. This time of the year in North Carolina is awful with the pollen. Everything is coated with a yellow-green powder. Lady is usually miserable and her blood sugar goes sky high (she's a diabetic) from the stress to her body. She has to be on a full dose of steriods.

This year she has been amazingly better. Normal blood sugar, no coughing and runny eyes. I'm a believer in fish oil now!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=52503
[/QUOTE]
I'll look it to the fish oil I feed Summer Natural choice plus i looked just know and there's no corn have to look again for the wheat and soy her eyes tear a lot too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
841 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by Theresa+Apr 14 2005, 06:06 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-LadysMom
@Apr 14 2005, 05:58 AM
What do you feed Summer? The top three allergens for dogs are wheat, corn and soy products. Unfortunately, a lot of the commerical foods, especially the less expensive ones, are full of them.

You can try eliminating those 3 thing and see what happens. Sometimes dogs become allergic to the protien source. I know many people who have switched their allergic dogs to a duck and potato formula with great results.

Another thing to try is adding a fish oil supplement. My Lady is very allergic and my vet had me add fish oil to boost her immune system. (I get the 3V caps for small dogs). This has made a terrific difference. This time of the year in North Carolina is awful with the pollen. Everything is coated with a yellow-green powder. Lady is usually miserable and her blood sugar goes sky high (she's a diabetic) from the stress to her body. She has to be on a full dose of steriods.

This year she has been amazingly better. Normal blood sugar, no coughing and runny eyes. I'm a believer in fish oil now!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=52503
I'll look it to the fish oil I feed Summer Natural choice plus i looked just know and there's no corn have to look again for the wheat and soy her eyes tear a lot too.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=52506
[/B][/QUOTE]
good question what does the fish oil do and how much do you give them ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
This probably is everything you need to know (and more!) about fish oil! I give Lady the 3V caps for small dogs, so the dosage is on the bottle (1 capsule a day). My vet said that I could just buy regular fish oil capsules and poke a hole in them and squirt some on her food. That didn't work too well for me because the hole would disappear pretty quickly so it was impossible aim the capsule so the oil got on the food instead of all over me and my kitchen!


Essential Fatty Acids and their derivatives serve a number of major vital functions in the body. They are required for the transport and metabolism of both cholesterol and triglycerides. They are required for normal brain development and brain function. They are required in visual function (retina), brain and nerve function (synapses), and adrenal function. They are required in the structure of the membranes that surround each cell in our body. They stimulate metabolism, increase metabolic rate, increase oxygen uptake, and increase energy production. They slow down growth of cancer cells.

EPA (from fish oil) also converts to series 3 prostaglandins, which have many benefits. They regulate inflammatory responses (Skin and Joint). They regulate immune function, which can help in fighting disease more effectively. They regulate platelet stickiness. They regulate arterial muscle tone, which involves blood pressure regulation.

The lack of Omega 3 and the excessive amount of Omega 6 in the modern diet ultimately create degenerative conditions. The store-bought processed foods still do not supply an adequate amount of Omega 3 to properly balance the ratio. Many nutritional supplements are still promoting and loading up the Omega 6 (LA) fatty acids -exacerbating an already severely imbalanced and unhealthy situation. The best solution to insure our pet's health is to provide a high quality Omega 3 Fish oil supplement along with a premium diet.

"Active EFAs can go straight to work in your dogs body, whereas inactive EFAs are unable to carry out their vital roles without first being converted by your dog to the active form. This conversion can only be carried out by enzymes, which your dog may or may not produce. If your dog does not produce those enzymes for any reason, those inactive essential fatty acids are not able to carry out many of their vital functions. This will lead to ill health.

Supplements which contain the activated omega 6 EFAs for dogs include Evening Primrose oil, Borage oil and Black Currant oil. Supplements which contain inactive omega 6 EFAs include vegetable oils such as safflower oil, sunflower oil and corn oil.

Supplements which contain the activated omega 3 EFAs include Cod Liver oil and Fish body oils such as Salmon oil. Supplements which contain the inactive omega 3 EFAs include flaxseed oil and hemp seed oil.

Why would these critical activating enzymes be missing?

The critical enzyme that converts inactive essential fatty acids into active essential fatty acids can be missing for one of several reasons. The first is heredity. The other more important reasons for the loss of this enzyme include aging, viral infections, any chronic disease state and a diet rich in trans fatty acids. Prevention is achieved by removing processed pet foods from our dogs’ lives and switching our dogs to their evolutionary diet together with appropriate fatty acid supplementation as and when required.

A diet that lacks sufficient omega 6 EFAs will cause skin problems, reproductive problems and growth problems. This situation can be counteracted by the addition of 'activated' omega 6 EFAs to the diet. A diet that lacks sufficient omega 3's is the number one fatty acid associated problem caused by modern processed pet foods. This lack of the omega 3’s allows the omega 6’s (if they are present in sufficient quantities) to produce the whole range of problems caused by an excess of the omega 6’s. In addition the lack of the omega 3’s can be a potent cause of infertility in our breeding stock together with growth problems in young pups and kittens, and most importantly, problems with the development of the nervous system. This can result in early deterioration of vision and hearing, learning difficulties in puppies and kittens and behavioral problems in our pets that can continue throughout life." Dr. Billinghurst's BARF World

"Fatty acids are essential components of cell membranes and are an integral component of the intercellular barrier in the stratum corneum. This barrier is formed by extrusion of lamellar granules containing phospholipids, glycosphingolipids, and free sterols that are produced by keratinocytes. Essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized and, therefore, must be supplied in the diet. Animals are unable to change one series of fatty acids to another, eg, omega-3 to omega-6. Dermatologic signs of fatty acid deficiency include a thin and discolored haircoat, scaly skin, sebaceous gland hypertrophy with hyperkeratosis of the sebaceous ducts and increased sebum viscosity, increased epidermal turnover rate, weak cutaneous capillaries, and decreased wound healing.

The essential fatty acids most important for homeostasis of the skin in dogs and cats are linoleic acid and linolenic acid. Arachidonic acid is also an essential fatty acid in cats. Dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) and eicosapentaenoic acid can be synthesized from linoleic acid and linolenic acid, respectively. The skin is deficient in desaturase enzymes that insert double bonds into the fatty-acid chain; therefore, continual transport of unsaturated fatty acids from the liver to the skin is required for epidermal turnover. Because linoleic, γ-linolenic, and DGLA accumulate in the skin but cannot be converted to arachidonic acid at that site, these fatty acids compete with arachidonic acid for cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes, which decreases production of inflammatory prostaglandins. Metabolites of DGLA (prostaglandin E1 and 15-hydroxy-8,11,13-eicosatetraenoic acid) and of eicosapentaenoic acid (leukotriene B5 and 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid) have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects.

In dogs with seborrhea, levels of linoleic acid in the skin are abnormally low, even though levels in the serum are normal. Oleic acid is believed to be substituted in skin when there is a relative deficiency of linoleic acid. Sunflower oil and safflower oil are good sources of linoleic acid and may be given at 1.5 mL/kg/day and 0.5 mL/kg/day, respectively. Concentrated fatty-acid supplements that contain eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid, decahexanoic acid, safflower oil, glycerin, and vitamin E have been effective in treatment of some seborrheic dogs.

Fatty acids are also beneficial in treatment of atopic disease. Atopic dogs have abnormal lipid absorption and metabolism. Although the benefits of fatty acids are clear, which combination of fatty acids is most effective and the most effective dose are not. Lack of response to one product does not preclude a favorable response to another product. Dosages several times those on the label may be required to control allergic pruritis. There are few side effects; however, pancreatitis has been rarely reported. Large doses may also cause weight gain or diarrhea." The Merck Veterinary Manual

Fish Oil is a favorite supplement for many pets as it seems to improve and help a lot of different problems.

"Fish oil is one of my favorite supplements for a variety of problems in both dogs and cats. As you mentioned, even normal pets can benefit from improved haircoats when supplemented with fatty acids such as fish oil. In pets, fish oil is useful for reducing inflammation in pets with allergic skin disease and kidney failure. It possibly also helps pets with heart disease and osteoarthritis. Studies show that pets fed high doses of fish oil also have better control of cancer. Extra vitamin E is needed when giving fish oil on a regular basis as fish oil supplemented for many months can lower vitamin E levels (most fish oil supplements contain additional vitamin E for this reason.) Side effects are very rare using fish oil. In my practice, a very few number of dogs develop a fishy smell. Fish oil may decrease platelet aggregation and prolong bleeding time. Pets taking high doses (3-4 times the label dose or greater) should be monitored for bleeding disorders, although I have not seen this even with these larger doses. There is concern about environmental contamination of fish oil with toxins. Studies have shown that fish meat (not oil) may be contaminated with methylmercury."

Dr. Shawn Messonnier

author of the award-winning *The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats
*available in our Dog Wize Book Store

"A diet supplemented with fish oil and the amino acid arginine appears to increase survival time in dogs with lymphoma, a cancer that affects white blood cells. Dogs with this kind of cancer, similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in humans, are easily treated, but as with humans, their cancer tends to return.

Half of the dogs received a special chow with the two supplements in it, and the other half ate chow with soybean oil added. The two chows were identical in nutritional value, and formulated to be equally tasty to the dogs. All the dogs were being treated with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin every three weeks, and were living at home with their owners.

Previous research has shown that some polyunsaturated fatty acids, like those found in fish oil, may help prevent the growth and spread of cancer tumors, and may help prevent cachexia -- the devastating weight loss and muscle wasting seen in some cancer patients despite adequate nutrition. Likewise, arginine supplements have been reported to improve immune responses, and might help the body fight cancer.

The dogs were fed one of the chows twice a day during and after their cancer treatment. The researchers report that compared to the control dogs, those who ate the supplemented chow showed higher blood levels of two fatty acids called C20:5 and C22:6 that seem particularly effective in fighting cancer. Dogs with more of these fatty acids in their blood also tended to have more normal levels of lactic acid, which tends to accumulate in the blood when metabolism is disrupted in cancer patients.

The dogs with higher levels of these two fatty acids survived longer than those with lower levels, and had longer remissions, periods of time before their disease came back."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
994 Posts
Originally posted by Theresa@Apr 13 2005, 09:33 PM
Hi Guys

Summer has been chewing her feet  almost from day one .  Vet said was prombly allergy , said would cost 200.00 to test .  A friend said to try this. Apple cider vinegar and alchol equal parts rinse paws.  She said, it works great on her pup and last a long time . Has anyone else heard any thing like this..
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=52453
[/QUOTE]


Maxi is going through this also they prescribed pretizone i didnt fill the presciption because im not putting him on that kind of medication he has been licking the air and his paws non stop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
For inhalent allergies, an antihistamine is a good thing to try. Talk to your vet about which one would be best for your dog. Often times, you have to try 2-3 to find one that works best for your dog. Jonathan gets chlorpheniramine for his mild inhalent allergies.

Rinsing the feet after they come in from outside can help, too. My preference is a pan/inch or 2 of water in the sink and then dab their feet dry. Sometimes I use some rinseless shampoo, too.

Foot soaks can also help. For yeasty feet, malaseb shampoo makes a good foot soak. Tea Tree Oil also makes a good foot soak (only use a drop or two in some warm water), but you have to be VERY CAREFUL to rinse the feet and not let the dog lick it as tea tree oil is toxic if ingested.

If your dog has very yeasty feet or a secondary bacterial infection, your vet can prescribe oral medication as well to help (ketoconazole/nizoral for yeast and an antibiotic like clavamox or cephalexin for bacterial infection).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
spell check this but cloraphnaramine 4mg... you can buy it for us too. That is what our lab gets when he gets itchy from mild allergies. It isn't a sterorid, and is very mild. He only gets takes it when he is itchy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
Lady gets Zyrtec for her allergies since she gets phenobarbitol for seizures and can't take most of the medications vets usually prescribe for allergies. A neighbor has an epileptic Westie who takes Allegra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,614 Posts
what if you notice your pup licking/pulling his hair on his legs ONLY when your not paying attention to him? Once you play with him and hes satisfied... he doesnt lick or pull at his feet. But if you dont play long enough or he still wants to play (or just wants attention) he will do the licking thing again.
What is going on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
When I asked my old vet about Fantasia chewing her feet I was told it wasn't allergies but boredom. I don't believe this because she still chews even if I push her away, try to pay attention to her, and even try to hold my hand over her feet. She doesn't go outside and she's on a good dog food so I don't know what the problem is. I just wanted to say that dogs also chew out of boredom.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
I think constant feet chewing or licking can also be a form of obsessive/compulsive behavior in some dogs. Maybe that's what your vet meant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,450 Posts
Lady's Mom,

Do dogs need a special dog-formula of fish oil or can they take the kind marketed for humans? My vet doesn't have it, but I think I've seen it at my local blackmarket shop. It sounds like something I need to get both my dogs on: Sir N because he's getting older (will be 8 in October) and Little C because the poor thing has had such a rough start (getting spayed AND both knees fixed between 6 months and 9 months old).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
My dog does it to.. he's not a malt but the vet told us it was alergys.. but my aunts dogs do them to and tell us its bordem...... BUT to know if its alergys smell your dogs feet.. if they smell like corn chips then they're allergic to corn starch or anything that has to do w/ it.............

you might what to try it!

also the vet gave us medicine and it didn't even help... so don't waste u're money..((well it didn't help for us)) and theres not alot you can do about it .... we give him Equate allergy medication diphenydramine hychoride ANTHISTAMINE... (in a pink box) and it seems to help a bit........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Originally posted by Theresa@Apr 13 2005, 09:33 PM
Hi Guys

Summer has been chewing her feet  almost from day one .  Vet said was prombly allergy , said would cost 200.00 to test .  A friend said to try this. Apple cider vinegar and alchol equal parts rinse paws.  She said, it works great on her pup and last a long time . Has anyone else heard any thing like this..
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=52453
[/QUOTE]


Hi All,
It has been a very long time since I've checked in but since Gigolo just went to the vet for a check up (we're going to be traveling) I thought I would comment on this question. Occasionally Gigolo would lick his paws, my vet also said it could be an allergy which you can buy a shampoo and frequently wash his paws...the problem is yeast and can get worse if not treated. Also it could just be a mild OCD!!! I've never heard about the vinegar cure but this site always gives you interesting alternatives!! My concern is if her paws are red wouldn't the alchohol be an irritant?

Gigolo was just a year old and incredibly weighs 3lbs 7 oz!! The vet says he's healthy and because he's tiny I shouldn't worry about him because he is healthy. Goodf luck with Summer!
Gigolo's Mom
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top