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To cure tear staining, you have to address the cause. That mean first a visit to your regular vet to check out teeth and ears and a visit to a veterinary ophthalmologist to rule out a physical cause. Inhalent allergies are a common cause. If it is deemed that the excessive tearing is simply structural - how the dog's face is built, then you have a few options:

1. A 10-14 day course of tetracycline. Some people repeat it once a year.

2. Tylan added to food or water. This is an antibiotic and has to be used continuously. Because I don't like using an antibiotic continuously because we already have so many organisms resistant to common antibiotics, I wouldn't recommend this.

Or, you can do a more conservative approach with daily care using products like Collyrium eye flush, washing the face, and keeping the face dry. If there is dye in the food you feed that can definately influence tear staining.

If you search on the web, you will find lots of web sites supporting various health benefits from apple cider vinegar, but no, I highly doubt it would cure tear staining.
 

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I recently read that also. It said to mix 1tsp. into their bowl or drinking water. It did say to use white cider vinegar. I have never looked for it in the grocery store so I am not sure if you can buy it there. We don't have very much of a problem with staining. Chief gets more gunky than wet so I haven't tried it. I am not sure the dogs would even like that flavor though. Let us know if it seems to help.
 

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Please keep in mind that the eye exam your regular vet does cannot always detect more subtle eyelids problems that are common in Maltese. A visit with a veterinary ophthalmologist where they have special equipment to find smaller defects which can often be corrected may be helpful.

For the Collyrium, I flush the eyes (not apply a few drops, but flush the eyes out) and then apply some to a cotton ball and wipe the face off. I have a dog with no lower tear ducts so everything drains onto his face. This alone keeps his face quite reasonable.

Another product I like is made by Absolutely Natural and it is called Groom Aid. You can spray it on a cotton ball and clean the face with it. It is an enzymatic waterless shampoo.

You can also put a heavier conditioner on his face a few times a week. Kolestral is the one most commonly used.

Don't leave the cornstarch on his face. If you put it on to dry the hair, then brush it all out. A toothbrush can come in handy here.

Sometimes, less it more and just dabbing his face with a cotton ball a couple times a day may help.
 

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Originally posted by JMM@Nov 27 2004, 07:33 PM
Please keep in mind that the eye exam your regular vet does cannot always detect more subtle eyelids problems that are common in Maltese. A visit with a veterinary ophthalmologist where they have special equipment to find smaller defects which can often be corrected may be helpful.

For the Collyrium, I flush the eyes (not apply a few drops, but flush the eyes out) and then apply some to a cotton ball and wipe the face off. I have a dog with no lower tear ducts so everything drains onto his face. This alone keeps his face quite reasonable.

Another product I like is made by Absolutely Natural and it is called Groom Aid. You can spray it on a cotton ball and clean the face with it. It is an enzymatic waterless shampoo.

You can also put a heavier conditioner on his face a few times a week. Kolestral is the one most commonly used.

Don't leave the cornstarch on his face. If you put it on to dry the hair, then brush it all out. A toothbrush can come in handy here.

Sometimes, less it more and just dabbing his face with a cotton ball a couple times a day may help.
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Jackie, Thanks so much for all of the helpful info!!
Is Kolestral a product marketed for humans or dogs?
 

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i have also read to use a teaspoon..but it doesnt say to how much water....what it does is change the ph of the tears preventing the bacteria from proliferating. makes sense...dont know if your dog will drink the water.
 

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okay found another site that says to add 1tsp to one quart...also read it can prevent fleas
 

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4 tsp to a gallon shouldn't change the taste THAT much...but vinegar does stink SO badly...I may give it a try too...

I HAVE been trying the Desitin trick...and used on a regular basis...it does seem to help tremendously...but it can get gunky....at night I use the rinseless shampoo from Petsilk and clean his face, especially around his eyes b/c I have noticed that after a couple of days, the desitin starts to clump up some...in the morning I use the tiniest amount of the Desitin on the end of a toothbrush and brush it just below his eyes where the tears run...if it happens to go on too thick...I just clean the toothbrush and brush the hair again until it is where I want it. It really does repel the moisture...as I noticed when I sprayed some of the rinseless shampoo on there (his eyes were covered)...the shampoo beaded up and rolled off just like it would off of wax.
 

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I use the Fresh Eyes eye wash and it seems to lighten the hair that is stained. It doesn't work right away, but about half an hour after the face is completely dry, you will notice it has lightened.
 

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I don't know if it works or not but it sure seems to be an added ingredient in several of the natural dog foods. I have been putting a teensy amount in Shiloh's water but in his case its too early to tell if it makes a difference.
 

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I have also heard that giving your baby a Tum everyday will change the pH of the tears. I have not tried it but it makes sense.
 
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