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I know I might sound like a uneducated maltese owner with this question. I want to brush Peechie's teeth. It seems to me most of the dog toothpastes out there don't really smell too good
If I use a tiny bit of human toothpaste, will this have any harm on her?? Doe's anyone know???
 

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"The AKC recommends toothpaste formulated for dogs (human toothpaste can upset the pets's stomach and ingestion of too much fluoride can be fatal) or a paste made from water and baking soda."
 

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Originally posted by Karen542@Oct 12 2005, 09:11 AM
Wow, thanks for letting me know about the fluoride

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my chem teacher in college once told me how she used to consult for businesses. She went to one factory and they had this tank of fluride. There was a SMALL leak in the valve. It would just dripping a little. Like 1 drop every 30 seconds or so. Well over time the fluride had eaten away at the concrete it was falling on! There was this hole in the floor.
 

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Here's more about the harmful effects of fluoride on dogs:

Fluoride for pets is a hidden poison - Fluoride levels in pet food are, according to Richard Pitcairn, DVM, surprisingly high. As far back as 1971, a study at the University of Montana found the average measure of fluoride in leading pet foods to be 11 to 193 ppm, with the highest found in canned pet food. If your dog weighs 100 pounds this translates to a daily consumption of 21 to 368 milligrams of fluoride from commercial food. The government upper daily limit of 2.5 milligrams of fluoride is said to be safe for children over three years of age. The Montana researchers found that fluoride accumulates in pet's bones. 84 to 1535 milligrams of fluoride was found in dog's leg bones. 74 to 1,190 milligrams was found in the bones of cats, and it increased with age.

According to Pitcairn, it is clearly recognized that long term fluoride intake damages human bones and soft tissue, it is not unlikely that fluoride accumulation is one factor contributing to the increase in bone problems found in pets.
 

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Originally posted by Lexi's Mom+Oct 12 2005, 10:19 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-Karen542
@Oct 12 2005, 09:11 AM
Wow, thanks for letting me know about the fluoride

<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=108749
my chem teacher in college once told me how she used to consult for businesses. She went to one factory and they had this tank of fluride. There was a SMALL leak in the valve. It would just dripping a little. Like 1 drop every 30 seconds or so. Well over time the fluride had eaten away at the concrete it was falling on! There was this hole in the floor.
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[/B][/QUOTE]


That is sacary...I never knew it was so strong
I use the mint flavored toothpaste for dogs when I brush Indy's teeth, it's not too bad. I like it better than the other flavors.
 

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Originally posted by LadysMom@Oct 12 2005, 09:20 AM
Here's more about the harmful effects of fluoride on dogs:

Fluoride for pets is a hidden poison - Fluoride levels in pet food are, according to Richard Pitcairn, DVM, surprisingly high. As far back as 1971, a study at the University of Montana found the average measure of fluoride in leading pet foods to be 11 to 193 ppm, with the highest found in canned pet food. If your dog weighs 100 pounds this translates to a daily consumption of 21 to 368 milligrams of fluoride from commercial food. The government upper daily limit of 2.5 milligrams of fluoride is said to be safe for children over three years of age. The Montana researchers found that fluoride accumulates in pet's bones. 84 to 1535 milligrams of fluoride was found in dog's leg bones. 74 to 1,190 milligrams was found in the bones of cats, and it increased with age.

According to Pitcairn, it is clearly recognized that long term fluoride intake damages human bones and soft tissue, it is not unlikely that fluoride accumulation is one factor contributing to the increase in bone problems found in pets.

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Omigosh! I used bottled purifed water for Pico's drinking water but it just occurred to me that I use tap water to cook his oatmeal. No more! Thanks for bringing this to our attention. San Antonio's water supply is fluoridated.

If you have trouble getting a toothbrush into Peechie's mouth, my vet said just put a dab on your finger and rub it over his teeth and gums good and the enzymes will do the rest. But, yes, use doggie toothpaste.

When I get the chicken-flavored doggie toothpaste out, Pico jumps into my lap and leans his back against my drawn up knees to get his teeth finger-brushed. He LOVES the taste and he knows the position I put him in and just assumes it!
 
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