Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,483 Posts
I would not know what to ask! Why don't you like your previous vet? Where I took ButterCloud to get neutered was safe, but they're not half as nice as my actual vet's office. I got lucky! They love my babies sooooo much. Someone always wants to hold them. There's this one doctor I love to go to because you can ask him any question and he'll give you such a thorough answer. I just feel that if they don't love my baby, they wont take care of him as well. HAHA

Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,741 Posts
well you can kindof figure out his personality by asking him what made them want to be a vet. it will give you a good idea about their compassion...which i think is a very important characteristic. think about the reasons your are leaving your current vet, and if it is about procedures etc, ask them how they run things. ask them if they have up to date equip. like ultrasound, laser in house lab, gas anesthesia etc. this will give you an idea how expensive they will be, but also will let you know how safe your pet is in their care. ask them for a tour...its good to know that they arent scared to show you the "behind the scenes" of the clinic. hope this helps, or gives you some ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
939 Posts
I found this article and thought it was very thorough.
Hope it helps,
Judi

****************************

Looking for a veterinarian is the same type of process when looking for a pediatrician.

When looking for a pet veterinarian you need to do the same type of research you would when looking for a pediatrician for your children or a doctor for yourself. Making the right choice can save you a ton of money or even save your pet’s life and, taking your pet to the vet will be more pleasant.

To find a good veterinarian the first step you should take is to get recommendations from people you know and trust. Make sure that you ask a variety of people who their veterinarian is, such as, friends, relatives, neighbors, breeders, and groomers. If you don’t know anyone with a trusted veterinarian, simply open up the phone book and find one near your home. In either instance, you will need to research the veterinarian to see if your pet and you will like them.

Once you found a veterinarian, ask for a tour of the facility. Check to see if it's as clean in the back as it is in the front. There should be no hair or slobber on the examining tables or equipment. Nor, should there be any strong animal odors.

Check to see if the equipment is up to date. Make sure the facility is equipped with the essentials, such as an anesthesia machine, teeth cleaning machine, and sterilizers.

Make sure that both you and your dog like the vet. Have a consultation with the vet; ask questions and get to know the Doctor without your pet there as a distraction. Make a list of questions to ask to make sure you feel comfortable before putting your animal in his or her care. Does the Vet speak to you in terms that are easy to understand? Does he act like he has plenty of time to spend answering your

questions?

When you feel comfortable about the vet bring your pet in for a check up. Does he spend sufficient time with you and your pet? How does he treat the animal? Is he gentle and loving? Does he remember your pet’s name? Is the exam thorough?

Another thing to look for in a veterinarian's office, is a friendly staff. If there is more than one doctor at the facility make sure that all of the doctors meet at least your minimum requirements as they may be the one to treat your pet in an emergency. Other staff, such as assistants, will be handling your pet, so make sure they are caring and good with handling animals as well. Another important factor in determining if this is a good office is being able to call with questions. The staff should be knowledgeable and able to help over the phone.

Hours of operation are also important. What hours does the vet keep? Make sure the vet’s hours of operation are compatible with your work schedule, otherwise, you may have to take days off just to take your pet to the vet. Other questions to ask are: Does the vet do house calls? How far in advance can you book appointments with the Vet, and how soon can you book them? Does the veterinarian’s office have 24 hour emergency care? If you have an emergency at 3:00am, will the Vet be there to take care of your pet? During a serious illness, or after a serious injury, you want to know that your vet is there and available for care. Do they offer an emergency phone number in case you need to contact the doctor during non-office hours? Do they send out appointment reminders by mail or e-mail? Do they call you to remind you of appointments?

You should always research the prices of veterinarians before you take your pet in. Are the fees comparable to other vet offices? Ask for a list of prices for different procedures. Often customers are shocked when they see the breakdown of their bill. It's good to have the costs up front. It's amazing how fast the shots and little extras add up. If your pet should need surgery, it could end up being quite a large bill. Does the vet allow you to make payments or do you have to pay it all at the time of the visit?

What types of services does the vet offer? The most common include: immunizations, spaying, neutering, teeth cleaning, and euthanasia. Are they able to take x-rays or do lab work or surgery in the office? Another nice service that some veterinarians offer is kenneling; if it is important to you that your pet be taken care of in a situation where they are familiar, where there is medical care, then make sure the vet has this service.

Keep location in mind. Having the veterinarian close to your house is one of the best conveniences you can have. If you are far away, this could interfere with critical or emergency care. Not only that, but most pets do not like long car rides or any car rides for that matter; having the vet near home can make the trip much more pleasant for them. A long car ride can make an already agitated pet more upset.

One of the most important things to find out about is, if the veterinarian has any complaints on file with the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). This organization regulates standards in 2800 veterinarian hospitals in North America. Veterinarians can apply to be members of this voluntary accreditation and agree to

abide by its 300 standards of evaluation including emergency service, surgery and anesthesia, radiology, nursing care, dentistry and medical records.




Written by Donna Theobald
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by Nichole@Oct 16 2004, 01:07 PM
Something else you might want to ask, and had I have known my doxie might still be alive.  


Ask about their blood test equipment.  My old vet did not have the machine which reads the blood right there at the vet's office (they sent it out) and by the time they got the blood results back (24 hours later  <_< ) my dog had died.  I still believe in my heart of hearts, had they have had that machine, they could have done something right then to save her or at least have given her better odds.

Also, try to develop a rapport with the vet.  The old vet (as you can tell I am not fond of them 
) did not listen to me when I told her that my doxie was REALLY sick, not just a cold.  She was to the point of lethargic and she was like, "Well, we will wait until the blood test comes back."
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=12133
[/QUOTE]

Im so sorry to hear that Nichole !!!!


i will definately ask about the blood test!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,741 Posts
yeah i would bring her and see how the vet reacts to her...it would look good on the vets part if the vet greets her first...(something we are taught to do in vet school) it will give you some hints on the vets compassion......but one reason not to bring her is if she would distract you from asking all the questions you need to ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,483 Posts
Hey mee! I agree with Lady Montava. Unless she'll be distracting to you, bring Jongee. Everybody, except the new peeps, at my vet's office know my babies. They always want to hold them. And the doctors love talking to my babies.

I think you're doing the right thing by leaving your previous doctor. I wouldnt like that at all. You could also ask the receptionists there too. Once I asked one of the receptionist about this particular doctor and they assured me that I will absolutely LOVE him and they were right! Every question I asked him he answered with a THOROUGH explanation. Liked I asked him what was a liver shunt...he even drew me a picture so I can understand! haha. Good luck with the interview.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
MEE aren't you in Miami too. If not then I got confused (sorry) but if you are I have a great vet that loves Bella and he's very good with me as well. I can ask him as many questions as I please and before I got Bella that my other puppy Piccolina died (he was not her vet) he spoke to me on the phone for like 30 minutes about Piccolina so when I got Bella I went straight to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,428 Posts
Originally posted by mee@Oct 18 2004, 02:08 PM
i went to the new vet today and i just got a check up just in case..but she said she was very healthy and nothing is wrong wit her..she was very nice..they even sell Wellness dogfood there! (thas what im feeding my baby and not many places carry wellness) <div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=12405
[/QUOTE]

WOW! That is different. Most vets around here sell Science Diet or Eukanuba.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top