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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi there

Daisy has just returned from her walk and she was stung by a wasp :angry: poor little thing.

I have removed the sting from her chest and made up a paste with Baking Soda and rubbed it into the sting.

I have read that benedryl helps, but is that human benedryl and how much... has anyone given their dog this before?

I saw her rolling around in the grass panicking a little on our walk and usually when she does this she has a twig her caught in her fur so I went to remove it for her and saw the wasp on her chest. I removed the wasp and tried to remove the sting but could not, so quickly put her in the car and removed it 5 mins later at home with tweezers. We walked to the car and she was not her self. I think she is a bit shocked by the experience.

She is lying down in the garden on a sun lounger feeling a bit sorry for her self now and has refused one of her favourite treats and her tail is down. The sting area has not swollen up so hopefully thats a good sign :huh:.

It must be quite a shock actually for her :wub:I have never been stung before so I dont know what it is like.

I am keeping my eye on her.

Any suggestions.. :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Quick update, she just came in the door and grabbed her treat and eaten it, headed for her bed to relax and then decided to head back to her sun lounger, its my partners really but she shares it :O)

Bless her.
 

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I'm no expert, but we have had at least one dog on our forum
die from a bee sting and several others have gotten sick, so I
would definitely call a vet and ask about giving some benadryl.

Hope that your baby is okay!!!

Debbie

Edit: I guess you were posting your second post while I was posting.
I'm glad that she's looking better and I hope all is well.
 

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Sandi-- w/Kitzel (Kitzi) & Lisel (Lisi)
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It is always good to have a shot to give in the event a dog is stung on the tongue by a bee or gets snake bit---here in Greece you have to buy it at the pharmacy but then keep it and can give it yourself if an emergency. You can then get the dog to the vet afterwards. Here it is a form of cortizone---I don't know if an epi pen would work in the US??? Anyone know here?
 

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I had to give my little Yorkie, Axel, Benedryl once. Our vet had me go to the store and get children's Benedryl and I believe the dosage was only 1/2 tsp. (I'm relying on my memory here and that may not be TOO reliable). I always keep some on hand now in case of emergencies, but would call the vet before administering to the exact amount to give.
 

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Is Daisy doing alright?
I also remember when a members dog died from a bee sting and I've heard of others that have too. Bee stings are one of my biggest fears. If she seems the least bit off I'd get her to a vet.
Please let us know how Daisy is doing and keep a close watch on her.
 

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I'm so sorry this happend to your baby. At a minimum, call your vet and let them know what happened. If it were my baby, I would call them, and ask to bring her in, so to have her checked over, and they can advise you on what to do, for any negative side effects.

As they others have said, sadly, we've heard of some bad side effects from bee stings, and it's not to scare you, just to inform you, and to get a hold of your vet.

Praying for you baby.
 

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Baci got stung and immediately went into shock..Staggering like he was drunk started to vomit and diarrhea at the same time.When i picked him up he was like a rag doll. Thank god my friend took him and i to the Hospital where he got shots... I have a Epi pen plus if i did not i have Children's benadryl.
I would call the Vet if it were me however it did happen within minutes
 

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I would also call and/or get her to the vet to check. Insect stings can be allergic to dogs as well as people. My DS has food allergic reactions that are anaphylactic and sometimes reactions can come in two stages (bi-phasitc reaction)one quite a bit later. The liquid benedryl is probably a good idea and the vet can check her vitals and breathing and see that all is okay or whether anything else like steroids or epinephrine (adrenaline is what I think it's called in the UK) is needed. Not sure if it is given to dogs. Hope she's okay but better safe than sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi there, she is perfectly fine now.

She had a sleep and is now playing with her treat ball and is back to normal.

I will keep my eye on her and if she shows any signs of change I will call the Vet.

Thank you all for your input. :O)
 

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I think that before you give Benadryl you should ask the vet first. I've already posted here that when my Bichon was bit by a Brown Recluse Spider, I gave her Benadryl. The vet said that was the WORST thing I could have done.
 

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I think that before you give Benadryl you should ask the vet first. I've already posted here that when my Bichon was bit by a Brown Recluse Spider, I gave her Benadryl. The vet said that was the WORST thing I could have done.
Suzan - did you vet say why Benedryl was so bad? Just wondering because I thought I read earlier threads about stings where vets said to give the antihistamine. Just curious.
 

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Suzan - did you vet say why Benedryl was so bad? Just wondering because I thought I read earlier threads about stings where vets said to give the antihistamine. Just curious.

In the case of the spider bite, the vet said that it was better for the immune system to work against the venom, not suppress it with Benedryl.

Benedryl blocks histamines and the inflammation response, which is the body's natural response to poison. It stops the body from engaging foreign invaders.

Because I gave Benedryl, my dog's reaction to the poison was more severe than others who were bitten by a Brown Recluse. She almost died.

Benedryl has its place, but it shouldn't be given automatically. People don't understand what it does. It doesn't cure anything. It blocks a response and sometimes the response is what is needed to help the body deal with the poison.
 

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Poor thing... glad she is doing OK. If she were having an allergic reaction, you would have noticed something by now, so I think she will probably be OK. You could always call your vet and talk to them about it on the phone and they will give you symptoms to look for if they think you should bring her in (usually they don't charge for talking to you over the phone)
 

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In the case of the spider bite, the vet said that it was better for the immune system to work against the venom, not suppress it with Benedryl.

Benedryl blocks histamines and the inflammation response, which is the body's natural response to poison. It stops the body from engaging foreign invaders.

Because I gave Benedryl, my dog's reaction to the poison was more severe than others who were bitten by a Brown Recluse. She almost died.

Benedryl has its place, but it shouldn't be given automatically. People don't understand what it does. It doesn't cure anything. It blocks a response and sometimes the response is what is needed to help the body deal with the poison.
Interesting. I've worked with some of the top food allergy experts in the world producing videos about those allergic reactions and our immune system when it's healthy works to fight things it views as enemies to our system, which is usually a good thing. But in the case of reactions to foods and also to venoms our system often kicks it into an overly aggressive response and thus histamines are produced and released by our bodies to try to attack the toxins. In the case of humans at least, those histamines can cause swelling and close off the throat and constrict airways. In minor reactions we used benedryl which is an anti-histamine to help to lessen those reactions and make it more comfortable -- things like swelling of lips, hives, etc. It isn't a cure at all. In the case of life threatening reactions we use epinephrine. My DS' reaction to foods when he was 2 almost killed him when his throat closed up and he was losing consciousness, because of the immune system's wrong response to foods, which should have been safe. So I think sometimes that response needs to be stopped before it gets worse, since the body is dealing with the "toxin" inappropriately. JMO and this may be completely different in animals.
 

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Interesting. I've worked with some of the top food allergy experts in the world producing videos about those allergic reactions and our immune system when it's healthy works to fight things it views as enemies to our system, which is usually a good thing. But in the case of reactions to foods and also to venoms our system often kicks it into an overly aggressive response and thus histamines are produced and released by our bodies to try to attack the toxins. In the case of humans at least, those histamines can cause swelling and close off the throat and constrict airways. In minor reactions we used benedryl which is an anti-histamine to help to lessen those reactions and make it more comfortable -- things like swelling of lips, hives, etc. It isn't a cure at all. In the case of life threatening reactions we use epinephrine. My DS' reaction to foods when he was 2 almost killed him when his throat closed up and he was losing consciousness, because of the immune system's wrong response to foods, which should have been safe. So I think sometimes that response needs to be stopped before it gets worse, since the body is dealing with the "toxin" inappropriately. JMO and this may be completely different in animals.

Good info, thank you Sue.

I agree, Benedryl is extremely useful for the allergic reactions you described. For a spider bite, where there isn't an allergic reaction per se, but a toxin being slowly released into the body, Benedryl wasn't the best thing.

Basically, it is probably safer to call the vet first before administering it.
 
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