Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My puppy is driving me crazy!!! He's 17-weeks and is completely defiant. I've lost all respect from him. How did that happen? I've been on crutches the last three weeks and have had a difficult time being on top of things at all times. Also have two children under 6 years.

Since I'm not able to pick up things as consistently as normal, Nibbles (my pup) is getting his mouth onto everything. When I say "drop it" or "leave it" in a very stern voice, he ignores me. He thinks it's fun to keep the item in his mouth and run out the doggy door with it.

Also, we just put new sod in the backyard and Nibbles keeps poking his nose into it and creating holes. What is a person to do???!!

I'm so negative right now. You name it, he does everything wrong (bites, barks, scratches at the door, chews plants, pulls up newly landscaped wood chip covering, doesn't listen...he is doing well potty training though). HELP!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Yup, Peanut did all of those things too. We really concentrated on training to replace the negative behaviors. It takes time, but Nibbles is just at that age for exploring and learning about stuff by chewing sniffing and biting.

BTW, if Nibbles is chewing in your yard there is a list of poisonous plants here somewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
I should add, Sylphide was a super-brat!!!! Hyper, active, and naughty (but we loved her anyway
! Luckily we had puppy proofed the house. That'll be hard if you have young kids...and, we had three adults in the home to give her our full attention...plus, at that time we had our oldest dog who was an excellent role model (she has since passed on, snif, snif).

They go through stages. With lots of love, patience, persistence, and training, Sylphide was already so much better behaved by 5 months or so. We saw a huge difference after 6 months or so, but she still had mischievous "adolescent" behavior. By one she was very obedient. At a year and a half she's very good. Formal obedience and agility training really make a difference.

Good Luck with your little guy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,863 Posts
i dont have any children...i have all the time in the world with my dogs....and they still have a hard time listening. and at 17 weeks...you cant expect anything. you cant really expect much at 1 year if you dont properly train them, you know?


dont get frustrated...have fun with the puppy. and this is the best time to teach your children some responsibility, right? <---honestly, i dont know.

good luck!! and puppies are a pain, so just remember that everyone has been in your shoes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,840 Posts
It is hard to keep the junk picked up with the kids..I will sympathize with that. My kids have had SO many things chewed up...you would think they would learn their lesson...but they haven't.
Brinkley has eaten Yu-Gi-Oh cards, Barbie limbs, foam nerf pellets, and SO much more! Good luck with that part!
I have NO advice...I haven't tackled that with success....


17 weeks does still sound young. That is just a few weeks older than when I brought Brinkley home. He still has lots of learning to do. Be patient. These little turkeys are smart! He may realize that you are not as quick and able with your crutches and take advantage some...
. Brinkley knows when I am busy with bills, grading papers, homework with the kids...that he needs to seize that opportunity to be naughty...b/c I am not paying as much attention.

Good luck...and be patient...lots of positive praise and treats. He will settle down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
You just described a normal puppy.

He is not defiant. If you don't know the rules, you cannot be defying them.

Most dogs and puppies take about 3 weeks to totally show their normal selves after a big change like coming to a new home. We call it the honeymoon period where they might be good as gold and then it ends and they turn into devils.

1. Confine your puppy when you are not watching him. A crate or x-pen is great for this.

2. Anything on the floor is fair game for a puppy to chew on. If you don't want him to chew on something, make sure it is up before he has access to that room. Using the leash like an umbilical cord (leashing him to you) can help you to more actively supervise him when he's out and about.

3. Put him on a leash outside and interact with him. Dogs sniff and dogs dig. It is normal dog behavior. If you don't want him to do it, you need to entertain him in some other way or give him a corner of the yard where he can do this.

4. He is teething. Provide lots of appropriate chew toys so he picks up the right things. Play the trading game with chew toys and treats. Call him from chewing on something safe to give him an even better chew or treat.

Kids, puppies, and life can make for a crazy situation. Trying to view his behavior as normal dog behavior and working with it from that angle may help your frustration. Also, remember a tired dog is a good dog. Walks and training games will help to tire him out. Also, feeding him his meals out of food toys (buster cube, treat balls, busy buddy toys, kong) will help exercise his mind and keep him entertained while he eats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by JMM@Mar 12 2005, 03:28 PM
You just described a normal puppy.

He is not defiant. If you don't know the rules, you cannot be defying them.

Most dogs and puppies take about 3 weeks to totally show their normal selves after a big change like coming to a new home. We call it the honeymoon period where they might be good as gold and then it ends and they turn into devils.

1. Confine your puppy when you are not watching him. A crate or x-pen is great for this.

2. Anything on the floor is fair game for a puppy to chew on. If you don't want him to chew on something, make sure it is up before he has access to that room. Using the leash like an umbilical cord (leashing him to you) can help you to more actively supervise him when he's out and about.

3. Put him on a leash outside and interact with him. Dogs sniff and dogs dig. It is normal dog behavior. If you don't want him to do it, you need to entertain him in some other way or give him a corner of the yard where he can do this.

4. He is teething. Provide lots of appropriate chew toys so he picks up the right things. Play the trading game with chew toys and treats. Call him from chewing on something safe to give him an even better chew or treat.

Kids, puppies, and life can make for a crazy situation. Trying to view his behavior as normal dog behavior and working with it from that angle may help your frustration. Also, remember a tired dog is a good dog. Walks and training games will help to tire him out. Also, feeding him his meals out of food toys (buster cube, treat balls, busy buddy toys, kong) will help exercise his mind and keep him entertained while he eats.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=42664
[/QUOTE]
Thanks for all the words of wisdom. After some time away from the situation, I realized I was being unfair. It's good to know that all puppies are that way. Now I just have to realize that he doesn't know what's right from wrong. I just have to be more diligent about educating him.

He does stay in a crate at night and his exercise pen during the day. I just like to give him some freedom during the day. I guess it's too early? He's leashed to me most of the time he's out of his exercise pen but I've let him run wild (with supervision) at times. I will make sure I pick things up before letting him free.

Any words of wisdom about growling/biting? He seems to like all the traditional deterrents that my trainer told me about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Originally posted by JMM@Mar 12 2005, 08:15 PM
What are you doing for biting and growling? When is he doing those behaviors?
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=42761
[/QUOTE]
He bites and growls if my children try to pick him up or if they want to pet him. He also bites at my kids' heels when they walk. He will also bite when I brush him. He basically bites a lot. My trainer said that I shouldn't let him get away with any of it but it's impossible to keep on reprimanding him each and every time.

We first tried the squirt bottle, then toothpaste in his mouth, then lemon in his mouth and even Binaca. I thought the Binaca would do the trick but then I found him chewing on the Binaca. All of the things would work for the first minute or so but then he would continue with the biting/growling.

Sometimes I wonder if I'm being too restrictive with him but as I said, my trainer told me not to let him get away with any of it. It's not the type of nibbling/gnawing puppies do, it's more of a snapping type of bite. Words of wisdom?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,482 Posts
I can imagine your frustration. When I first tried to brush and do light grooming on Catcher, he would bite me and struggle. I thought maybe I had a "bad" dog or something.... Now, at 10 months, he sits nicely for grooming, even putting his head down so I can get to his top knot.... and I didn't even train him to do that... he just did it on his own.

Here's what I suggest on the grooming issue: Take it very slowly. Start with just a couple minutes at the grooming area and maybe don't even do any grooming... just handle the brush and let him see it. Then the next time maybe touch him with the brush and then slowly proceed adding more each time. After each session give him a treat. And talk sweetly and softly to him. That worked so well for me. Just whisper "sweet nothings" to him in a soft and calm voice.

Please check the archives on this site for instructions from Jackie (JMM) on how to properly groom and brush. That's important, too! And she has more info posted on how to work with a dog that doesn't like to be groomed.

IMPORTANT: All of JMM's posts are extremely informative and a must-read for a first-time owner. To view them, click on her name over her avatar and you'll see a page where you can click to see all of her posts. Then sit back and enjoy and prepare to be enlightened!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Originally posted by Kallie/Catcher's Mom@Mar 13 2005, 06:24 AM
I can imagine your frustration. When I first tried to brush and do light grooming on Catcher, he would bite me and struggle. I thought maybe I had a "bad" dog or something.... Now, at 10 months, he sits nicely for grooming, even putting his head down so I can get to his top knot.... and I didn't even train him to do that... he just did it on his own.

Here's what I suggest on the grooming issue: Take it very slowly. Start with just a couple minutes at the grooming area and maybe don't even do any grooming... just handle the brush and let him see it. Then the next time maybe touch him with the brush and then slowly proceed adding more each time. After each session give him a treat. And talk sweetly and softly to him. That worked so well for me. Just whisper "sweet nothings" to him in a soft and calm voice.

Please check the archives on this site for instructions from Jackie (JMM) on how to properly groom and brush. That's important, too! And she has more info posted on how to work with a dog that doesn't like to be groomed.

IMPORTANT: All of JMM's posts are extremely informative and a must-read for a first-time owner. To view them, click on her name over her avatar and you'll see a page where you can click to see all of her posts.  Then sit back and enjoy and prepare to be enlightened!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=42790
[/QUOTE]
Thanks for the info. As for Nibbles' biting (to JMM), we are currently just trying to trade our hands/finger with a toy simultaneously with a firm "no biting". I just read all of her other posts. So sad to hear about the sick pups.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
The kids should not be picking him up.

Let's set guidelines to do every time he starts biting and stick to them carefully.

If he runs after the kids nipping ankles, you can prevent this by leashing him or confining him when the kids are running around. It isn't really a great situation to have a tiny puppy hanging out while the kids are running around. If he does somehow get an opportunity to do this, have the kids yell ouch very loudly, stop and stand still for you to come and get him and put him up for a few minutes. This is what I call time out. For time out, I happily say "uh oh" and happily have the dog crate up for 10 or so minutes to calm down and be taken out of the game. When I let them out, we run through a few simple behaviors for treats before going back to play.

I would put him up on the dryer or table on a rubber mat and train him to sit, stand, lay down, etc. Once he has that down (maybe a week or so of work), add the brush. If he bites the brush, you have 2 choices. The first time, you can correct him with a strong verbal correction (hey! that's enough). OR, you can ask him for an alterntive behavior (sit and treat while I brush your back). A lot of it is he can get away with it and it is a game for him.

If he bites you while playing, yelp or yell ouch and do a time out. Biting ends the game immediately.

I don't generally use the word no or reprimand my dogs directly for biting. I find it doesn't work very well when dogs are really into the nipping. Ending the game has been much more effective for me because it prevents the dog from getting hyped up and our interaction turning into me constantly saying no.

I actually don't use the word no with the dogs. If they do the wrong behavior, I happily say uh oh and they try something else (uh oh is my indicator for wrong behavior, try again). I usually just call out a cue for a different behavior (sit or come) and give them a treat. My dogs ALWAYS leave things when I ask because it just starts another fun game rather than taking the good thing they found away from them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by JMM@Mar 13 2005, 12:40 PM
The kids should not be picking him up.

Let's set guidelines to do every time he starts biting and stick to them carefully.

If he runs after the kids nipping ankles, you can prevent this by leashing him or confining him when the kids are running around. It isn't really a great situation to have a tiny puppy hanging out while the kids are running around. If he does somehow get an opportunity to do this, have the kids yell ouch very loudly, stop and stand still for you to come and get him and put him up for a few minutes. This is what I call time out. For time out, I happily say "uh oh" and happily have the dog crate up for 10 or so minutes to calm down and be taken out of the game. When I let them out, we run through a few simple behaviors for treats before going back to play.

I would put him up on the dryer or table on a rubber mat and train him to sit, stand, lay down, etc. Once he has that down (maybe a week or so of work), add the brush. If he bites the brush, you have 2 choices. The first time, you can correct him with a strong verbal correction (hey! that's enough). OR, you can ask him for an alterntive behavior (sit and treat while I brush your back). A lot of it is he can get away with it and it is a game for him.

If he bites you while playing, yelp or yell ouch and do a time out. Biting ends the game immediately.

I don't generally use the word no or reprimand my dogs directly for biting. I find it doesn't work very well when dogs are really into the nipping. Ending the game has been much more effective for me because it prevents the dog from getting hyped up and our interaction turning into me constantly saying no.

I actually don't use the word no with the dogs. If they do the wrong behavior, I happily say uh oh and they try something else (uh oh is my indicator for wrong behavior, try again). I usually just call out a cue for a different behavior (sit or come) and give them a treat. My dogs ALWAYS leave things when I ask because it just starts another fun game rather than taking the good thing they found away from them.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=42874
[/QUOTE]
Thank you so much for all of your great advice. I will definitely try out all of those things. I feel the same way about "no". For a while, I felt like I was always saying "no" or reprimanding vs. giving Nibbles positive rewards. I looked into clicker training for that same reason. I'm currently using a trainer who doesn't clicker train so I thought I would wait so that Nibbles doesn't get confused. Can I ask you if you treat your dogs all the time when training to sit, down, etc? My trainer only has me giving Nibbles treats with "come". Thanks again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,482 Posts
Originally posted by jaker@Mar 13 2005, 11:07 PM
Thank you so much for all of your great advice.  I will definitely try out all of those things.  I feel the same way about "no".  For a while, I felt like I was always saying "no" or reprimanding vs. giving Nibbles positive rewards.  I looked into clicker training for that same reason.  I'm currently using a trainer who doesn't clicker train so I thought I would wait so that Nibbles doesn't get confused.  Can I ask you if you treat your dogs all the time when training to sit, down, etc?  My trainer only has me giving Nibbles treats with "come".  Thanks again.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=43005
[/QUOTE]
All the training I've been involved in says to give a treat and praise when they do what you ask for all tasks. They say to give a treat every time and then eventually give a treat every other (with praise every time) and eventually wean them from the treats over a period of time once they are reliable on the commnd... of course every now and then you can give a treat to reinforce the training, etc.

Hopefully, Jackie, will jump in here . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
I use treats and a clicker while teaching them the behavior. Once they have generalized it in many situations and have it down pat, I reward intermittently with food but always verbal praise. This is called variable schedule reinforcement and actually is motivating to them to continue the behavior (like gambling and slot machines).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Sisse says "defiance is my middle name", She is 18 weeks and terribly independant!! She gets out on the porch, knows she is NOT allowed down the steps to the yard, she sits down, looks over her shoulder to see if we are watching and then high tails it down the steps!! She KNOWS that's not allowed, she grabs something then, a small rock, a leaf, whatever and then races back up the steps. She'll run to her outdoor bed and lay down with her back to us and proceed to try and eat whatever treasure she found and brought back up with her. We immediately say NO, DROP IT!! She'll grab it and run (I think at this point in time it's a game to her to defy us)!! They are a handful aren't they!! But, you gotta love them !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
Sisse doesn't know she can't go down the steps. She knows it is a dangerous behavior when you are around. Then she knows when she has something and you come, you are going to take it away. Of course she runs with it.

1. If you don't want her in the yard, put a gate up.

2. Play the trading came with her and teach her to retrieve and give things. Teach her a solid recall. NEVER call her to take something away from her and always praise her for finding something and giving it to you but offering her a treat or special chewy for being so good. Provide her with appropriate chews of her own and prevent her from accessing things she shouldn't chew.

She isn't defiant, she's smart and doesn't want the game to end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Originally posted by JMM@Mar 21 2005, 04:43 PM
Sisse doesn't know she can't go down the steps. She knows it is a dangerous behavior when you are around. Then she knows when she has something and you come, you are going to take it away. Of course she runs with it.

1. If you don't want her in the yard, put a gate up.

2. Play the trading came with her and teach her to retrieve and give things. Teach her a solid recall. NEVER call her to take something away from her and always praise her for finding something and giving it to you but offering her a treat or special chewy for being so good. Provide her with appropriate chews of her own and prevent her from accessing things she shouldn't chew.

She isn't defiant, she's smart and doesn't want the game to end.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=45078
[/QUOTE]

Yeah, we figured out the "if I have something Mom runs after me to take it" game pretty fast. Please though, tell me what a "solid recall" is....forgive my ignorance. She has tons of her own things to chew, inside, outside etc. Also, why shouldn't I call her to take something away?? She has not mastered the the "drop it" command yet. When we do take something away from her we always replace it with something that is "allowed" as far as chewing. We were trying to teach the "stay" command as far as the steps to the yard went, she seems so confused at times by all the different commands. I really think some of her acting up is pure frustration with all the "training" that goes on. So, we scrapped it all and take one command at a time until it is mastered. She has not been with us long, 6 weeks now. She knows....sit....up.....down....no bite (that was a big one), we are currently working on "leave it".....I think us being so anxious to train may of backfired on us.

As far as the puppy gate goes, we are in the process of closing in the back porch/patio area. We have birds of prey here and I freak out when she goes in the yard (that's why we were working on "stay"), but in the mean time, she's not allowed out at all unless she has our attention 100%.

I will appreciate any ideas you have about training!! :new_Eyecrazy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,428 Posts
Originally posted by Sisses Momma+Mar 22 2005, 02:10 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-JMM
@Mar 21 2005, 04:43 PM
Sisse doesn't know she can't go down the steps. She knows it is a dangerous behavior when you are around. Then she knows when she has something and you come, you are going to take it away. Of course she runs with it.

1. If you don't want her in the yard, put a gate up.

2. Play the trading came with her and teach her to retrieve and give things. Teach her a solid recall. NEVER call her to take something away from her and always praise her for finding something and giving it to you but offering her a treat or special chewy for being so good. Provide her with appropriate chews of her own and prevent her from accessing things she shouldn't chew.

She isn't defiant, she's smart and doesn't want the game to end.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=45078
Yeah, we figured out the "if I have something Mom runs after me to take it" game pretty fast. Please though, tell me what a "solid recall" is....forgive my ignorance. She has tons of her own things to chew, inside, outside etc. Also, why shouldn't I call her to take something away?? She has not mastered the the "drop it" command yet. When we do take something away from her we always replace it with something that is "allowed" as far as chewing. We were trying to teach the "stay" command as far as the steps to the yard went, she seems so confused at times by all the different commands. I really think some of her acting up is pure frustration with all the "training" that goes on. So, we scrapped it all and take one command at a time until it is mastered. She has not been with us long, 6 weeks now. She knows....sit....up.....down....no bite (that was a big one), we are currently working on "leave it".....I think us being so anxious to train may of backfired on us.

As far as the puppy gate goes, we are in the process of closing in the back porch/patio area. We have birds of prey here and I freak out when she goes in the yard (that's why we were working on "stay"), but in the mean time, she's not allowed out at all unless she has our attention 100%.

I will appreciate any ideas you have about training!! :new_Eyecrazy:
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=45422
[/B][/QUOTE]

A solid recall is when you can tell her to come and she does it everytime.

This site has is pretty helpfull: Clicker Solutions
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top