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Marj,

Thank you for sharing this article. Very helpfull information about this problem.

 

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Thanks Marj for the article. I have a question about this if anyone has experience with it. It says that this usually doesnt show up until 4 years or so, but is it possible that puppies show signs earlier? I have heard phoebe caughing slightly before, nothing major, but was wondering if that is common in puppies since they are still developing, or if it could be leading up to something like this. I know I"m paranoid
Holli used to have little coughing after she would drink water too fast or something, but never more than that. just curious...
 

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Pico experienced that coughing, honking after his dental. The anesthesia tube they put down his throat irritated his trachea and caused some swelling.

Could that process of administering anesthesia for dental CAUSE a trachea to collapse? Anyone know? His was so bad this last time (after his 2nd cleaning) that I took him in and vet gave him a steroid. I'm at the point I really don't want him to go through that again because of my concern about collapsing his trachea.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by Pico's Parent@May 16 2005, 11:55 AM
Pico experienced that coughing, honking after his dental.  The anesthesia tube they put down his throat irritated his trachea and caused some swelling. 

Could that process of administering anesthesia for dental CAUSE a trachea to collapse?  Anyone know?  His was so bad this last time (after his 2nd cleaning) that I took him in and vet gave him a steroid.  I'm at the point I really don't want him to go through that again because of my concern about collapsing his trachea.
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Pamela, ask vet about just masking Pico down next time he needs a dental. That's what Dr. Suzy did with Lady last time. She said anesthesia is filtered through the liver and although all Lady's liver values are still normal, Lady gets seizure meds which can damage her liver. Suzy felt it would be safer to just mask her down. I would think Pico would be a good candidate for it also.
 

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Excellent article... I went ahead and posted it below....

Collapsed Trachea: The Health Problem Every Owner of a Small Dog Should Understand</span>

<span style="color:red">Have you ever heard a dog cough, take shallow, quick breaths, and honk like a goose?

Those are symptoms of a collapsed trachea, a health problem found almost exclusively in Toy and other miniature dog breeds.

Not every Toy breed will develop this but enough do (estimates range from 20% to 40%) that owners should learn more about this condition.

Highest risk breeds are Chihuahuas, Italian Greyhounds, Maltese, Pomeranians, Toy Poodles and Yorkshire Terriers.
The trachea or windpipe is held open by rings of cartilage. When the cartilage weakens, the trachea begins to collapse and the amount of air that can get through is severely restricted.

This condition usually appears between the ages of 4 to
14 years. The restricted airflow puts excess stress on the heart and lungs.

Heat, humidity and excitement exacerbate the problem. A dog will have trouble breathing and may try to vomit to clear his airway.

A dog with a collapsed trachea usually can't exercise without having problems and in some severe cases, may even pass out from lack of air. Any exercise is likely to fatigue him.

If your dog does develop symptoms, the condition usually can be managed with medication and restricted activity.

Sometimes children's flavored cough suppressants can help or your veterinarian may want you to use a prescription brand to treat coughs.

In more severe cases, steroids may be used for a time to reduce inflammation in the trachea. Because of their side effects, including weight gain, they are seldom used for long.

In worst cases, the dog's tongue and gums turn blue and acute attacks require hospitalization. About 1% of dogs with this condition do die from complications.

A surgical procedure that uses stents to widen the trachea is available, but this is a risky and expensive surgery that hould only be done as a last resort and only by a veterinary specialist.

Although the condition is congenital or inherited, there are things that an owner can do to lessen the onset or severity of the condition:

1. Feed your dog a high quality dog food. Proper nutrition helps formation of cartilage especially in the puppy years.

2. Don't overfeed, however, as overweight dogs are affected more than others.

3. Use a harness rather than a collar when walking your dog. He can wear a collar with his tags but don't attach a leash that adds pressure and pulling around his neck.

4. Don't smoke around your dog. You wouldn't smoke around a human baby, would you? Remember that it doesn't take much smoke to damage the airway of a 5-pound dog.

5. Keep vaccinations up to date. This helps prevent respiratory infections.

Watch your dog for symptoms and ensure that he gets
treatment if any symptoms do develop. Most affected dogs can lead normal, although somewhat restricted, lives.

Note: This article may be reprinted and used by other publishers and webmasters provided credit is given to Louise Louis and www.ToyBreeds.com.
 

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Marj,

You really are a dear.
Thanks for sharing what you find. It really does help all of us.


Susan
 

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They can mask them down to get them groggy enough to intubate, but the dog still has to be intubated for the dental cleaning. They might try a smaller tube if they have one. Jonathan gets a bit irritated after but it goes away within a day. I doubt that is a collapsing trachea but rather an irritated one.
 
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