Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
Thanks for posting that! I can't even tell you how many people come up to me to and say that Peanut is big. He's between 5 and 6 lbs. He's tiny to me, but this whole craze with the tiny dogs is getting out of hand. The health of those little ones should be the main concern, but of course $$$ always comes first
I read an article somewhere about their skulls never being fully developed and that can lead to dangerous injuries with a simple fall or bump on the head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
Lacey weighs just over 7 pounds. I have had so many people tell me she is huge! My vet has also told me that she is seeing lots of health problems in the tiny dogs. She thinks Lacey is a great size and wishes she saw more of the toy dogs that weren't breed to be so tiny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
Those extra small dogs not only come with a huge price tag, they also run up huge vet bills.

* They break bones easily, especially legs, by jumping on and off furniture. There have been cases of bones shattering on impact from normal playing or being held too firmly.

* Their mouths are usually not big enough to accomodate all their adult teeth and they have problems with overcrowding, decay, etc.

* Internal organs may not be fully or adequately developed.

* They have trouble regulating their own body heat. They can literally starve to death because they have to expend so much energy trying to maintain a normal body temperature.

* They have trouble regulating their own blood sugar.

* They are more prone to diarrhea and vomiting. Since they can dehydrate so quickly, even a simple case of diarrhea can become life threatening and require a trip to the vet, possibly hospitalization.

* Extra and expensive tests are needed prior to routine teeth cleanings and surgeries.

* Even with the best of care, it's not unusual for so-called "teacups" to die at very young age, sometimes living only 2 or 3 years even with the best of care.

The author of one of the articles I read suggested that if a 5 pound dog is too heavy for you, get a stuffed animal!

Good advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info Marj...you're a wonderful resource. Wouldn't it be nice if an afternoon of surfing on SM (especially your posts) were a requirement to puppy ownership? I'm just so glad I found SM before we got our pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
HAHA yeah I always say that you should have to pass a test to own a pet and even to have a baby (of course that one would be harder lol). But come on, you have to pass a test to drive so why not have to pass a test to own a pet? It is after all a life we are talking about here!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
894 Posts
Great advice as always Marj, thank you!! Several more reasons for having a "plus size" puppy as you call it!! I am so thankful Sis is not so "delicate"......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,098 Posts
Thank you for the info. When I was looking for a maltese I wasn't looking for a tiny dog...I was looking for a healthly dog. Lacey weighs 7.2 pounds and I can't begin to tell you how many people tell me she huge! People tell me that maltese are tiny little dogs and she can't possible be a full maltese. I can't believe it and most of the time I just stare at the person until they go away. I am very happy with her size and she is a healthy dog and that is what should be important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,614 Posts
Originally posted by LadysMom@Mar 23 2005, 12:53 PM
Those extra small dogs not only come with a huge price tag, they also run up huge vet bills.

*  They break bones easily, especially legs, by jumping on and off furniture. There have been cases of bones shattering on impact from normal playing or being held too firmly.

*  Their mouths are usually not big enough to accomodate all their adult teeth and they have problems with overcrowding, decay, etc.

*  Internal organs may not be fully or adequately developed.

*  They have trouble regulating their own body heat. They can literally starve to death because they have to expend so much energy trying to maintain a normal body temperature.

*  They have trouble regulating their own blood sugar.

*  They are more prone to diarrhea and vomiting. Since they can dehydrate so quickly, even a simple case of diarrhea can become life threatening and require a trip to the vet, possibly hospitalization.

*  Extra and expensive tests are needed prior to routine teeth cleanings and surgeries. 

*  Even with the best of care, it's not unusual for so-called "teacups" to die at very young age, sometimes living only 2 or 3 years even with the best of care.

The author of one of the articles I read suggested that if a 5 pound dog is too heavy for you, get a stuffed animal!

Good advice!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=45667
[/QUOTE]
1st of all... Kodie is refered to as a "teacup" (I hate that when people call him that!!!!) anyway.... These are a very good list of things to worry about when "waiting" a tiny dog and getting one that was bred toooo tiny.

Kodie has a few of these problems...
*I do not allow him to jump on anything too high, like furniture because his bones are so tiny he could hurt himself. I also tell people to be extra careful when holding him because of his tiny bone structure. Hes never around small children and always watched when hes with other dogs.

*Kodie's mouth is also too tiny for his teeth. He had 7 baby teeth pulled and his big side teeth are staggered down his jaw because his mouth can not fit all of those teeth. His jaw isnt developed correctly either. He chews always on the one side because i'm guessing that he cant chew on his other side because of how the teeth are aligned!?! I just know the vet told me that his jaw isnt formed too great but is better looking than his little sister that passed away.

*I dunno if Microvascular Dysplasma has anything to do with developed organs but he has MVD. (which is a liver disease) (any dog can get this)

*Kodie was vomitting after going to the groomers for the first time and he had to be put on IVs and hospitalized over night because he was soooo sick. (He hasnt had any diarrhea yet so i dunno about that... but i'm sure if he ever gets that i'll have to take him to the hospital.) My vet tells me to NEVER wait if kodie gets sick, just bring him in.. hes tooo tiny to ever wait.... quicker the better!

* * "Extra and expensive tests are needed prior to routine teeth cleanings and surgeries."
Isnt this the truth! Before Kodie had his baby teeth pulled and neutered... he had to have all this blood work done because of his liver and they KEPT him OVER NIGHT when other dogs would go home... instead Kodie was put on IVs after surgery to make sure he was dehydrate after being neutering and his teeth pulled... normal dogs dont have to be put on IVs for this!

Now... Kodie isnt as tiny as the dogs they are refering to in this article but he still has some characterisitics of what happens when you breed two tiny dogs together just to get tiny babies. I'm sure a lot of you remember me posting that Kodie was the only pup to survive the litter. His little sister (which fits ALL of these characterisitics in this article) died at 6 months old... she never made it to even 1lb, thats how tiny she was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Originally posted by LadysMom@Mar 23 2005, 01:53 PM
Those extra small dogs not only come with a huge price tag, they also run up huge vet bills.

*  They break bones easily, especially legs, by jumping on and off furniture. There have been cases of bones shattering on impact from normal playing or being held too firmly.

*  Their mouths are usually not big enough to accomodate all their adult teeth and they have problems with overcrowding, decay, etc.

*  Internal organs may not be fully or adequately developed.

*  They have trouble regulating their own body heat. They can literally starve to death because they have to expend so much energy trying to maintain a normal body temperature.

*  They have trouble regulating their own blood sugar.

*  They are more prone to diarrhea and vomiting. Since they can dehydrate so quickly, even a simple case of diarrhea can become life threatening and require a trip to the vet, possibly hospitalization.

*  Extra and expensive tests are needed prior to routine teeth cleanings and surgeries. 

*  Even with the best of care, it's not unusual for so-called "teacups" to die at very young age, sometimes living only 2 or 3 years even with the best of care.

The author of one of the articles I read suggested that if a 5 pound dog is too heavy for you, get a stuffed animal!

Good advice!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=45667
[/QUOTE]
Could you give the name/author of these articles? I would love to pass this on to a friend of mine who has decided that a Mi-ki dog is too big for her, and now wants an "apple head' chi, one less than 2 pounds at adulthood no less!
Thanks,
Quincymom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,614 Posts
Originally posted by Quincymom@Mar 24 2005, 04:41 PM
I would love to pass this on to a friend of mine who has decided that a Mi-ki dog is too big for her, and now wants an "apple head' chi, one less than 2 pounds at adulthood no less!
Thats sick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Yes, I think so too. She isn't really a friend, but a coworker. She doesn't know that I have dogs, but I have been trying to collect good information to pass on to her. Hopefully, she will pay attention and go looking for a healthy dog instead of a tiny one.
Quincymom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,035 Posts
I'm so glad to hear that you are trying to look out for your coworker. It's hard to pass on important info when they are staring into the eyes of a teeny pup. Sorry I don't have any info though...The only thing I know is that a coworker of one of my friends has a chi, and it has gone through countless surgeries and has tons of joint problems. I think this chi is maybe 2 years old max...the owner is completely broke because of the dog's med. bills.

I just remembered an article about 'apple head' chi's...I will try to find it. If I remember correctly it is very dangerous for the dog because the skull doesn't properly fuse together with age. I could be totally wrong, but I will try to find the article for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,614 Posts
apple heads? I was wondering what your refering to? I never heard that term before. Are you talking about the soft spot on the top of a pups head and if it doesnt close up when its fully grown?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
My best friend, stevie had been looking for a chihuhua, and she wanted one "tiny like Paris Hilton's", which actually Paris' dog isn't that tiny, Tink is pretty standard. But I conviced her to look a quality more than size, and now she has a very healthy pup who loves to play and chase cats. I think she will be about 5 pounds full grown which is still totally small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I wonder if "apple head" is one of those terms that some breeder's use to make people think they are getting something special for their extra cash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
I don't know too much about chi's but I think it is a term like "teacup". It refers to the round dome shaped skull, and like the other poster said, often the fontanel remains open, and usually the dogs have problems like hydrocephalus. Sad that breeders are trying to intentionally breed dogs with birth defects, isn't it?
Quincymom
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top