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From the AARP Magazine :

Healthcare credit cards, including CareCredit (from GE Money) and ChaseHealthAdvance, can be used to pay unexpected vet bills and defer interest for 3 to 24 months.
But the penalty for not paying off the loan on time is steep : interest rates are as high as 27.99%, dating from when the charge was incurred. Both cards also have fixed-payment plans that charge interest from the get-go. Rates vary widely, depending on your credit history. - C.E.M.
 

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:w00t: 27.99%:w00t: You could go to vet school for less. Only kidding but I've found that sometimes you can ask your vet or human doctor to do things on a payment plan and there's no interest.
 

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I LOVE Care Credit! :aktion033: I've had it for a few years now.

I first got it for expensive dental work that insurance wouldn't pay for.

When I found out I could also use it at the vets, it's been wonderful.

Often we get 6-12 months interest free. You have to make sure you pay it off before the promotion ends or they will whack you. So far, we've paid everything before that so it hasn't been a problem for us.

You can also use it for cosmetic or eye surgery.
 

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:w00t: 27.99%:w00t: You could go to vet school for less. Only kidding but I've found that sometimes you can ask your vet or human doctor to do things on a payment plan and there's no interest.
I agree. The best thing IMO is setting up a separate bank account for vet bills and adding to it each and every month. An automatic transfer is the best way to do that.

If you are a good client, vets will often work out a payment plan with you. My vet didn't charge any interest for years, but now charges 1.5% ... no big deal if you pay it off in six months.
 

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I also highly recommend CareCredit. It is ideal for emergency situations. Its really pretty straight forward. There are no hidden tricks. Pay in the amount of time allotted or deal with the penalty interest. And for those without health insurance, many human medical offices accept it.
 

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I agree. The best thing IMO is setting up a separate bank account for vet bills and adding to it each and every month. An automatic transfer is the best way to do that.

If you are a good client, vets will often work out a payment plan with you. My vet didn't charge any interest for years, but now charges 1.5% ... no big deal if you pay it off in six months.
That's the way I've done it. I put money away & saved it in case we got hit with high vet bills. I'm so glad I did. Boo's vet bills have been HUGE, but they were paid & we didn't have to worry about it. Now I just have to start saving it again to build the account back up to where it was.
 

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Thankgoodness we never needed the credit. We always had enough savings to pay for the vet bills. The 2 surgeries Alex had were not cheap (Sue knows about those with Boo). The last vet visit for Alex's heart condition costed us 800$ (x-rays, ultra sound..). Two years ago when we almost lost him it was a 1000 bucks.
 
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