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I am planing a trip to Europe, and I was wondering if anyone knows any details about having your Maltese on board of an airplane with you? I do not want him in the cargo, so im doing as much research on how I can bring him along with me. Any information will be very much appreciated!
 

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You can purchase an airline-approved bag for him, and have to keep him under the seat the entire flight. I suppose you could take him to the bathroom with you on the plane.

It doesn't sound any more humane and appealing to me than having him in cargo (climate-controlled) but I guess some people think it is better.
 

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Most airline websites have information regarding their pet policy. Some do allow dogs to travel in an approved carry-on for an additional fee. Another thing to consider is if the area you are visiting requires a quarantine period due to some areas being rabies-free zones. We couldnt bring Obi to Hawaii due to the 3-4 day quarantine period.
 

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Amra -- I would pm edelweiss with this question. She lives in Greece but is an American and she and her DH travel with their fluffs through Europe and to the U.S.

Although I travel by plane with my fluffs, I have not travelled with them internationally and I know that the requirements are different. Sandi (edelweiss) could probably be very helpful with info.

Due to the time difference, I don't imagine that she's seen your thread yet.
 

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Im still new to this and dont know how to work the site to well. How would i find edelweiss? Thanks for your help!
 

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I pm'd Sandi and asked her to respond to this thread. I think we would all like to know the answer. Check this thread again in the morning (due to the time difference).
 

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Check with airlines,just in case, some airlines won't allow pets in cabin for flights longer than 8 hours since they have to be in their carriers .....potty issues.
 

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My suggestion is that this be made into a sticky for future reference. This has to do w/INTERNATIONAL flights only.

Airline rules change constantly, and vary from country to country, airline to airline so be certain to check w/the airline you are traveling prior to travel EACH time.

1. Be aware that European countries require an EC pass-port (which we get from our local vet which is numbered). It contains the vaccine stickers, worm treatments, etc. for each dog. It has to be signed by a certified vet and dated, for each trip. This passport MUST have current rabies vaccine (l year only) and prove the dog is microchipped (numbered bar code in the passport). Other vaccines are not presently required in Europe (but this might change so check before travel).
2. If you are flying to & from the US to Europe you may have to go through the agricultural department ([B)]if you have no pet-passport)[/B]) BE AWARE this can take some time so allow 4-6 weeks to process all papers and it will require an extra fee, and travel to a specific office. Your local vet can advise you.
3. If you are traveling to the UK, it is not possible to fly in with your dog. You must check the current requirements regarding how to enter the country (which ferry lines are approved and able to process animals). There is a web site which the UK gov't. hosts which will give you up-to-date and very specific information on this. Be certain to check it EACH time to travel to the UK. The UK does not have rabies and the requirements are stringent, but one can now travel w/a pet under these rules.
3. When booking a ticket you must make certain that there is space on your particular airline for your animal as only one dog is allowed per cabin---unless your dogs are siblings and traveling in the same bag and within weight restrictions for that airline. When you book ask for written confirmation. Be aware that this confirmation may not be valid if you are traveling w/more than one carrier!!! example: within Star Alliance.
4. Each airline is specific about the bag the dog can use but as a rule it must be a certain size, have a secure zipper, fit under the seat and be waterproof.
5. The bag will cost you around 250$ for an international flight (check w/airlines) and it is counted as your carry-on luggage. You may not carry another luggage on board in Europe. You may take a purse.
6. The dog must remain in the bag, securely zippered, the entire flight. You are not normally allowed to take this bag to the rest-rooms (due to security issues). Some stewards will allow you to take the dog to the rest-rooms but don't count on it.
7. Ask the airline security people to allow you to walk through security w/your dog, rather than going into the ex-ray machines. Your bag will go through the ex-ray. Your hands will be scanned on some occasions.
8. In the European airports you can take your dog out of the bag & let them run on the leash. There are normally grassy areas outside where your dog can relieve themselves. Remember to do this BEFORE going through security. Be certain you have your pet passport (or agricultural department papers) w/you if you go outside w/your dog---you may be controlled.
9. When you arrive back in the US you can't take your dog out for relief until you have cleared customs, which can take some time.
10. In Europe there are handicapped toilets with only one toilet which are larger than usual & the door goes to the floor. It is possible to take a dog into one of these usually with a pish pad.
11. In some airports in the US there are now relief areas for dogs (large rooms w/fake grass) where you can take your dog before departure. These can be researched for a particular air-port on line. I know for a fact that Dulles has one, and I think Phoenix.
12. I normally fast my dogs for 24 hrs. before flying unless it is a short flight and I know the area where I will be allowed to "potty" my dog once I arrive. I do give them ice chips and some water, especially toward the end of the flight.
13. Do not drug your dogs when flying. They will remain calm if you remain calm. Some drugs can have an effect which you would not want when arriving w/your dog.
14. In some European countries you can travel on public transport w/a dog, and some you can not. Sometimes you must use a mouth restraint and leash to travel on public. Sometimes you must purchase a ticket, and sometimes if the pet is in a bag it is gratis. Be aware of the rules, as fines can be costly. Usually dogs are welcome in most eating places in Europe, both inside & outside. Be aware of the people around you and keep your dog under control at all times.
15. Dogs are usually not allowed at tourist places such as museums, etc. and one is not allowed to leave them in the hotel rooms alone. Sometimes w/little dogs exceptions will be made if asked politely. Do not expect this, but appreciate it when it happens. You may be required to have the dog in a purse, during this time.
16. Be careful when traveling w/a small pet---it is stressful for the pet and he/she might snap unexpectedly at strangers. If anyone asks to pet the dog, be aware. I do not let anyone pick up my dog when traveling.
17. Regional airlines do not allow more than one dog on the plane, so if you are flying from Europe you may want to rent a car and drive the last leg of your journey or book far ahead to secure that one spot.
18. US airports have rules regarding leaving your pet zipped in it's bag until departing the airport. Sometimes you can get away w/cheating but do not be offended if you are asked to secure your dog---it is airport policy.
19. There are weight restrictions on the size of a dog (weight including the bag in which the dog flies). Check w/your particular airline.
20. You can not bring dog food into the US from overseas, even food that originated in the US.
21. Travel with provisions for removing your waste, in the event of an accident w/your dog. I travel w/a plastic bag containing treats, local water, wash cloth, small hand towel and pish pads. Any medications should also be in this bag.
22. Consult online vet services of the areas you will be traveling in the event of emergency---have local numbers and codes on hand.
23. When traveling within Europe I take my own dog food. Do not expect to find your US brands in pet shops. You may luck out, but go prepared.
24. Do not attempt to "cheat" on the regulations or you dog may be confiscated.
25. Be kind, and considerate at all times and use tears as a last resort if you find yourself in difficulty. Ask "what can I do to rectify this situation?"
26. Make certain your dog has an internationally readable micro-chip or take your own scanner w/you. It is also wise to register this chip information on line before travel (requires a small fee).
27. It really is easy to travel once you know how to do it & go prepared. Most animals can stay in European hotels w/out issues or extra fees. Enjoy your trip.
 

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Wow, Sandi, what great information you provided. That just made me realize that I don't want to take my dogs on a long overseas flight. It sure sounds stressful. Still for those that must, or want to take pets with them, your information is priceless.
 

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Wow... this is great information, Sandi! The only thing I'd add is to check with your vet and just know your dog. If he tends to get nervous, you can give him some baby benadryl to calm him down during flight. I find "water" is a bit of issue because U.S. custom doesn't allow more than 4oz carried with you. I did have to throw away the water I had and bought a new bottle after I passed the security. Look into the aircraft that you have booked. Even within the same airline, different aircraft have different "leg room".

Good luck with your travel~~~
 

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Sandi, :you rock:thanks so much for taking the time to put this together. I agree it should be a sticky. I was going to post on this thread last night, about what I found out when I checked into taking Sammie non stop to Paris last year. But waited for you to reply. I had already decided I would not take him on a vacation type trip overseas anyway.
Hugs,
Kandis
 

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I hope I didn't discourage anyone from traveling w/pets---it really isn't that difficult---it just sounds like it is---sort of like getting your first skin baby! I travel w/my two as much as I can and they get used to staying in the bag, etc. so go for it!!! Just make certain you are prepared ahead of time.
Once I traveled w/a dog to Africa (Liberia) and that was awful---but it is the only time I have had a thoroughly terrible experience.
 

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I hope I didn't discourage anyone from traveling w/pets---it really isn't that difficult---it just sounds like it is---sort of like getting your first skin baby! I travel w/my two as much as I can and they get used to staying in the bag, etc. so go for it!!! Just make certain you are prepared ahead of time.
Once I traveled w/a dog to Africa (Liberia) and that was awful---but it is the only time I have had a thoroughly terrible experience.
You didn't discourage me to travel with a dog. I was discouraged way before. I have traveled with a dog years ago and it is now like day and night. Today I would not do it unless absolutely necessary. You barely have space for yourself, so imagine how much space is left for your dog. I don't want him to be put to all that stress. In some planes there is not enough space to put him under the seat when you have a window seat. And I don't know which airlines you took, but most if not all american airlines don't allow pets in the cabin anymore for international flights. Unless their policy has changed, Air France and Lufthansa still do and if you can afford a business class there is enough space for your dog. But then if you are going anywhere else than Paris or Frankfurt, you will have to take interior flights and it is real tight. Or like Sandi suggested rent a car.

We traveled with our dachshund in 1978. Nobody asked us for health certificate or rabies vaccination or anything when we came from France to the States. And I had everything. My mom came with the same dog in the 80's and nobody ever asked her anything. She even was put in 1st class at one time WITH THE DOG PAYING NOTHING because there was not more space in economic class and she payed full price for economy. We entered France with the dog on the leash (not hidden in a bag) and walked all over the airport and nobody asked for anything. We didn't need a special bag authorized by the airline. The dog was in a normal bag fitting his size. We could take him out of the bag during the flight. I agree, this was too lax probably, but what they do today is too much.

I didn't mention British Airways because I would never take a dog to England. I would not take the risk. Not even for a stop over.
 

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One thing I failed to mention is that with the new configuration of reclining seats in Business Class one can not take an animal anymore w/Lufthansa or United (may be true on all Star Alliance lines). Since I usually fly economy I did not remember that. Dogs are allowed on most international airlines in economy, but on a first-come, first-serve basis of one per cabin. Once we were given BC upgrades & DH flew in one direction and I in the other on the alternate direction---the other stayed in economy w/our dog.
If I lived in the US rather than Europe & only "traveled" I might not expend lots of energy studying which airlines gives you the most leg room in which model of plane, who is generally the nicest in how the pup is treated on board and where the potty places are located in which airports. But since I live and work abroad I choose to take my babies with me when I know I will be away a bit longer. When this isn't an option (usually due to work) I expand my efforts to find someone to care for them in their home (as we don't have kennels like in the US).
I am old enough to remember when I could be met AT the gate where I arrived, but hey, "nostalgia isn't what it used to be.":HistericalSmiley:
 

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Hi Amra, I'm from Italy and I travelled worldwide with my beloved Et, many of them to USA. I had my flights with delta or Airfrance, Who are the most pet-friendly companies. ET had to stay in his cage under my seat. To tell you the truth, I've always opened the kennel and put him on my knees, as he Was used to and a very good boy :), just hiding him under my jacket when the hostess came...
You have to pay a ticket for him, the last time i came it Was about 50/80 dollars and you must have a kennel of the right size. Here in Europe, pets have their own passport and for USA frontier the antirabic vaccine Was required. On the passport you must have a good healt certificate issued just before the departure.
That's all, have fun, it's the best travelling with our fluff
 

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I traveled almost 100K miles last year and one of my criteria when selecting a breed was that he/she had to be small enough to go on the plane with me. Honestly, traveling with a pup in the cabin should not difficult at all. Years ago when I traveled a bit less I would sometimes take my GSD who went under the plane and that was very nerve-wracking to me as I had to hope that the handlers were careful with her. I don't like handing over my dogs to strangers if possible, not everyone is nice or an animal lover. Anyway, do not hesitate to take your small dog along with you if they travel well in a crate in a car, they should be fine on the plane. The only advice I can give is to make sure you follow the guidelines set by the airline and the country you are entering if traveling internationally.
 

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:aktion033: THANK you Sandi for your input..We always appreciate experience! I researched for a good bag to travel with dogs and found many good reviews even by flight attendants for Sturdibag. www.studiproducts.com is website. I LOVE the bag I bought because it is lightweight, not too many bulky pockets and easily fits in space under seat by compressing to fit.
 

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Jeanne, I also have the Sturdibag (in large) for the 2 to travel together. I have used the Sherpas in the past & they were great for just one dog. The Sturdi large is a bit higher than allowed but it is flexible so it fits better under the seat than some of the others. I think I still have 2 small, and l medium Sherpa, but am sold on the Sturdibag for now. Lisi loves to hide in the bag at home too. One could probably use it in the car w/a secure seat belt as it has 2 openings for the heads to pop out. I really like that you can fix the zippers so the dog can't persist in getting the nose through & pushing out.

The double one I have is rounded on the top!
 
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