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The more I read, the more I shop at the local health food store here. :D lol Thank goodness their prices are pretty reasonable!
 

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LOL! Thanks, Suzan! That article was definitely a good (and amusing) read. :HistericalSmiley:

I wanted to comment on that Dr. Eades article you posted in the thread that had been closed. I couldn't agree more with his suggestion of decreasing or avoiding carbohydrates to improve health, especially when it comes to chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. In all honesty, I just don't understand the logic of decreasing fats and increasing complex carbohydrates when trying to lower blood sugar. A high complex carbohydrates diet translates into a high sugar diet, LOL. Carbohydrates break down as sugar into the bloodstream, thus increasing insulin. How is this going to benefit a type II diabetic who already has an INCREASED level of insulin??

I actually know of several vegetarians who are overweight/obese. One acquaintance of mine practices vegetarianism, and she's extremely overweight/borderline obese, and she just can't understand why she's not shedding the pounds when she avoids fats like the plague and exercises like a maniac. :smilie_tischkante:

It really is no wonder that America is the fattest country, with dietary recommendations of cutting down protein and fats, while increasing complex carbohydrates. Going to Korea this past May really, really put this into perspective, as practically everyone is as thin as a toothpick there. My boyfriend's family from Japan and Sweden came to visit, and they were seriously shocked by how prevalent obesity is here. :w00t:

Anyway, thanks for posting that Dr. Eades article. I have read his book Protein Power, and like him, I believe that excess insulinlevels (insulin is an important hormone, but excess levels are toxic for the body) lead to weight gain/obesity, not necessarily the other way around, as someone in the closed thread quoted (based on scientific evidence, blah, blah, BLAH). Oh, and like Dr. Eades, I'm mad as he ll, too. I think the diet that the American Dietetic Association pushes is a dangerous one, especially for those with chronic illness. My honest opinion only.
 

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LOL! Thanks, Suzan! That article was definitely a good (and amusing) read. :HistericalSmiley:

I wanted to comment on that Dr. Eades article you posted in the thread that had been closed. I couldn't agree more with his suggestion of decreasing or avoiding carbohydrates to improve health, especially when it comes to chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. In all honesty, I just don't understand the logic of decreasing fats and increasing complex carbohydrates when trying to lower blood sugar. A high complex carbohydrates diet translates into a high sugar diet, LOL. Carbohydrates break down as sugar into the bloodstream, thus increasing insulin. How is this going to benefit a type II diabetic who already has an INCREASED level of insulin??

I actually know of several vegetarians who are overweight/obese. One acquaintance of mine practices vegetarianism, and she's extremely overweight/borderline obese, and she just can't understand why she's not shedding the pounds when she avoids fats like the plague and exercises like a maniac. :smilie_tischkante:

It really is no wonder that America is the fattest country, with dietary recommendations of cutting down protein and fats, while increasing complex carbohydrates. Going to Korea this past May really, really put this into perspective, as practically everyone is as thin as a toothpick there. My boyfriend's family from Japan and Sweden came to visit, and they were seriously shocked by how prevalent obesity is here. :w00t:

Anyway, thanks for posting that Dr. Eades article. I have read his book Protein Power, and like him, I believe that excess insulinlevels (insulin is an important hormone, but excess levels are toxic for the body) lead to weight gain/obesity, not necessarily the other way around, as someone in the closed thread quoted (based on scientific evidence, blah, blah, BLAH). Oh, and like Dr. Eades, I'm mad as he ll, too. I think the diet that the American Dietetic Association pushes is a dangerous one, especially for those with chronic illness. My honest opinion only.
:goodpost:
 

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Many years ago I have done the Atkins diet. I lost the weight but when I stopped gained everything back and some more. I cannot stay on it, I love too much my french bread and fruits. On the veggie side, there is not much I can cut down since there are only a few I like and those are not the starchy ones (besides potatoes). A lot has also to do with metabolism. But that's not why I started that post. When Atkins wrote his book, he already said at the time that sugar substitutes like aspartame are bad and everybody was against him. Today we hear, yes, those sugar substitutes are bad. He also said in his book that sugar is bad and we would be better off to use saccharin. But that saccharin has been kept out of the market because of the sugar lobby pressuring the Government. I don't remember exactly but it is something like this. Saccharin does not make you gain weight like sugar does.
 

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Thanks, Suzan. Good article ... sad but true. I grew up in a "meat and potato" home where the meals varied little. Breakfast was cereal and fruit or fruit juice, lunch was a sandwich, chips and a piece of fruit or a cookie, after school snack was saltines and cheese and/or a piece of fruit, dinner was meat (fish on Friday), potato, veggie and jello, pudding or fruit for dessert. We hardly ever ate rice, never had a salad, and none of us had a weight problem. We had one TV, no computer, and played outside every day except when it was raining. As we got older, started working, started eating on the run, had money in our pockets and started eating out, sitting in front of a TV or computer, paying someone else to mow the lawn, etc. etc., oops, along came those extra pounds and we all wondered why. You've mentioned the Primal Blueprint in some of your past posts, I bought the book and actually read it, and decided it's really time I got back to some better eating and exercise habits. I've not given up grains entirely but do eat far less of them. Breakfast is usually eggs & sausage or yogurt & fruit, lunch is a salad and whatever leftover meat and veggies from the night before, and dinner is salad, meat, veggies and an occasional potato. I do like fish but hate the smell in the house so only eat it when I can grill it outside. And a rare splurge is pasta, usually with something like chicken marsala. Bagels, muffins and breakfast bars were never my thing. And I don't crave or miss sandwiches either. Although I still pay someone to mow the lawn, I do more yardwork and more walking (like to the local ice cream place:innocent:). Having made just some simple changes I've noticed two major benefits -- (1) my clothes fit better (although I've been the same size since I got out of school) and (2) I'm tired less and have a lot more energy for getting things done. So, thank you for your posts and for raising my awareness about my own good/bad lifestyle habits. :aktion033:

And, by the way, my cholesterol has alway hovered between 100 and 120, with an excellent ratio of good/bad.
 

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I hardly eat a starchy veggie now.I do miss potatoes,they're filling. Gotta watch peas,the purin makes Al's gout go crazy. He had to give up peanuts,which I do miss,but he can eat cashews... not a chashew fan myself...
We don't eat chips or junk food,we're not fast food fans...we love our veggies especially broccoli,steamed and just the slightest bit of butter. Though most of the time,we forego the butter. I love to do a snack bowl of raw cauliflour,carrots and broccoli and ,sometimes pinch in a little hard boiled egg.
We really took stock of what we were eating this year,Al was getting the "preggo gut) I was growing a second *ss , so we needed to do something...
We cut out night snacking on icecream and pizzas ,ditched sodas,instead drinking unsweetened teas or plain old water...and started working out and lifting weights. We feel good.
We're not loosing lots of weight, Al wasn't overweight anyway,but I am. But is weight what's on the scale...not always. muscle weighs more than fat and I've lost a couple inches here and there and I'm down to an *ss and a half....
People ask why? We say we want to live long enough to be there for our dogs...
It's funny when others we knew gave up junk food and sodas,we though ,boy that's hard, but once you don't eat it for a week,you hardly miss it.It actually doesn't taste good after you refrain from it for a couple weeks....
 
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