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Discussion Starter #1
I am having two problems that I am worried about.
1. Miley my new puppy who is about 12 weeks old is still potty training. When we take her outside she doesn't go. She stays right by your side and whines and crawls up your leg like she is scared. But when we take her in 5 minutes later she goes to the bathroom in the house. I am getting frustrated and I don't know what to do.
2. My 2 year old male is being a butt. He is mean to Miley and won't come near her. When she gets close to him he growls and runs away. And he seems so different like he's depressed or mad at me. Will he get better?
 

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It may take sometime for your 2 year old to get used to the new pup,
be patient. When I got Alvin, Reginald was 13 and didn't want to have
nothing to do with him for months. The opposite happen when I got
Chloe, Alvin and her had an immediate bond and Reginald was ok with her.
 

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Ya i am hoping that he warms up to her because in the future I would like to breed them. He is a spoiled brat and acts exactly like a 2 year old child if he doesnt get his way. It cracks me up how much dogs have their own personality!!!
 

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I haven't come across a similar experience to your point (1), but here is what I might do if I were u, I think that in order for Miley to go potty outdoors during her walks, the first thing she should learn is to love being outdoors and going for walks. From what you are describing, she doesn't like it....hmmmm, Maybe start taking little treats along in your walks, praise her for walking..etc dont know the exact method in teaching her how to like her walks, but this is just one thing for consideration- associating something she loves with walking time will make her look forward to more walks. I know that in order for her to go potty outdoors, she gotta feel comfortable and happy being outdoors in her walks.

Point (2) when Crystal came to our family, snowy was a month away from turning 3 years old, but he loved Crystal the second he met her. So again, not too sure about the answer to your question. From other people's experiences, for some it takes some time until they get used to it. I hope it is the case with your two :)

All the best!
Kat
 

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Ya i am hoping that he warms up to her because in the future I would like to breed them. He is a spoiled brat and acts exactly like a 2 year old child if he doesnt get his way. It cracks me up how much dogs have their own personality!!!
Hmm! I don't think it is a good idea to breed them. If I were you, I wouldn't do it
 

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I think that Max is also trying to tell you that breeding pet fluffs isn't a good idea...maybe that is why he isn't accepting Miley? ... but seriously, there are risks on doing that. Always better and wiser to leave the breeding to reputable breeders, in my opinion.
 

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ya. thats not our first priority. We got her so that we could have another dog and for a companion for max.
ok, that is a good sign :) and again, if I were you, I will continue letting her be just a companion for Max and get her spayed instead :thumbsup:
Some people have asked me why I didn't breed Crystal and why did i spay her...Here are some really useful links as to why I recommend leaving breeding fluffs to only reputable breeders....

Thinking about breeding your *pet* dog?

Should I breed my dog?

Ethical breeders

and here is one useful article:
Are you a Backyard Breeder?
Originally written by Sunny Arruda (South Bay Purebred Rescue)
Personalized by C. Guss (Bastian's Place - Feline & Canine Rescue)



Over 10 million homeless animals are euthanised every year in the United States. The death could easily
be stopped by spaying and neutering your pets.

Euthanasia is the single largest cause of death for dogs in the Untied States. Each year 27 million dogs
are born. Five to ten million are classified as 'Surplus' and destroyed (killed). That's about one million a
month. These animals are those who 'must' be killed simply because they are unwanted. These numbers do
not include the millions of dead dogs scraped off the streets, or the hundreds of thousands of abandoned,
severely neglected or abused dogs who never make it to a shelter to be counted and killed.

Most of these animals are young and healthy; in fact, it is estimated that around 80% are less than one
year of age. The problem is simple: we have too many dogs with too few homes available. The solution we
have opted for is to kill the 'extras'. This solution has been considered acceptable by default, as though there
were no other way to control the crisis and we spend over $1 billion every year destroying 'Man's Best Friend'.

Why is this happening in the United States today? The largest contributors to this problem are Backyard
Breeders and Puppy Mills.

The name 'Backyard Breeder' has become very unpopular. Nobody wants to admit they are a backyard
breeder. Many people don't even know they are part of the problem. The only way to stop the needless killing
of dogs is to stop the needless breeding of them.

Every breed of dog recognized by the AKC, UKC or CKC has a written standard, a blueprint of what the
dog should look and act like. These standards were written so that all would know what a quality example of
the breed is and strive to produce dogs that meet or exceed the standard in health, temperament and
appearance. To be sure that you are breeding dogs that meet these standards, your dogs must be judged by
people who have a lifetime of experience among the breed. Do you know the standard of your purebred dog?
Does your dog meet this standard according to an AKC judge? If not, your dog is pet quality. Your dog is to
be loved, cherished, trained, cared for, spoiled and bragged about but it is NEVER to be bred. No matter how
cute or sweet the dog may be, if it is not up to the standard, you have no business breeding it.

If you have a purebred dog, this does not give you the right to breed it. Most purebred dogs are not
breeding quality. If you breed your pet quality dog, you are a backyard breeder. Whether you breed the dog
in your backyard, garage, living room or an expensive hotel room, the term is still backyard breeder. If your pet
quality dog has papers (AKC, UKC, CKC), that's nice but it doesn't change anything. You still don't have the
right to breed it.

If your pet quality dog cost you $500 be glad you had the money to afford it. You still don't have the right to
breed it.

Do you think that you can make your $500 back if you breed your pet quality dog or if your pet is a color or
a size that isn't the breed standard but you just know everyone will want to buy a pup if you breed her? Shame
on you! Now you are a backyard breeder with the purpose of peddling pups for bucks.

If the price for a tail dock or an ear crop may seem high to you, what are you going to do when your
beloved pet needs an emergency C section? Will you even be there to know if she is in trouble? Would you
even be able to recognize the signs before it was too late?

And if you still want to breed your pet quality dog but need to ask who is supposed to cut off the tails and
ears, ask yourself "What in the **** am I thinking?"

Do you think genetic testing is something they used in the OJ trial but has nothing to do with your breeding
career? You are a backyard breeder.

Backyard breeders sell pup's that aren't up to the standard of the breed. They do this for many reasons.
None are good enough reasons to contribute to the killing of the dogs. Period.

Backyard breeders will swear all of their pups went to good homes. They believe this but it's not true.
Some may have been luck enough to go to a good home but more than half will end up dead, in a shelter,
alone on a cold table with a needle sticking out of their leg. Some of those good homes will get tired of the
dog and will just give it away to the first person willing to take it. Some of your beloved dog's children will end
up living alone in a backyard, barking all night, cold and neglected until the owner gets complaints and then the
pup will be dead. Some will be starved and beaten. Some will be bred until they die from it. Some will end up
in a rescue and I will have to find space for them. I will have to teach them that not all humans are bad. I will
remove their fleas and get rid of their worms. I will have them vaccinated for the first time in their lives because
the previous owners neglected to remember. I will spay or neuter the animal to ensure it is not snatched up by
someone looking to make a quick buck. I will do all of these things that the previous owner should have done
because they didn't want to.

Backyard breeders are not responsible pet owners. They think they love the dogs but that isn't really true
because they don't want to bother with all that it takes to breed ethically. They love feeling important when they
say "I breed purebred dogs." but breeding pet quality dogs is not something to be proud of. It is a shame on
our society. It is the reason for the death that occurs in shelters. Why do you want to be part of that?

Do you want to be respected? Spay or neuter your pet dog. There is really no other way. The kinds of
homes that you want for your pets puppies do not want to purchase a pup from you. They are looking for
responsible, respected breeders who are doing something for the breed as a whole. Most of those who will
come running to buy one of your pups are the kind of people I wouldn't give a nasty, aggressive dog to. They
are people who will turn your sweet little puppy into a shelter once the novelty wears off. That is a fact.

Spay or neuter your pets now and tell everyone you know to do the same. Leave breeding to people who
are doing something to better the breed. These people breed for quality, not quantity.

Want to be a respected breeder? Do your research and find an individual who is an educated and
respected member of the dog breeding world. Ask this person to be your mentor. You need to know what you
are doing before you are even ready to begin. Have a savings account ready for any and all problems that you
will encounter. Purchase only top quality bred dogs and plan on showing them. Do everything that your mentor
tells you, he/she has the experience and is not just trying to push you around. Be sure that everything you do
as a breeder meets the standards which have been set for responsible breeders. Or, Don't Breed!
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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24,171 Posts
ok, that is a good sign :) and again, if I were you, I will continue letting her be just a companion for Max and get her spayed instead :thumbsup:
Some people have asked me why I didn't breed Crystal and why did i spay her...Here are some really useful links as to why I recommend leaving breeding fluffs to only reputable breeders....

Thinking about breeding your *pet* dog?

Should I breed my dog?

Ethical breeders

and here is one useful article:
Are you a Backyard Breeder?
Originally written by Sunny Arruda (South Bay Purebred Rescue)
Personalized by C. Guss (Bastian's Place - Feline & Canine Rescue)



Over 10 million homeless animals are euthanised every year in the United States. The death could easily
be stopped by spaying and neutering your pets.

Euthanasia is the single largest cause of death for dogs in the Untied States. Each year 27 million dogs
are born. Five to ten million are classified as 'Surplus' and destroyed (killed). That's about one million a
month. These animals are those who 'must' be killed simply because they are unwanted. These numbers do
not include the millions of dead dogs scraped off the streets, or the hundreds of thousands of abandoned,
severely neglected or abused dogs who never make it to a shelter to be counted and killed.

Most of these animals are young and healthy; in fact, it is estimated that around 80% are less than one
year of age. The problem is simple: we have too many dogs with too few homes available. The solution we
have opted for is to kill the 'extras'. This solution has been considered acceptable by default, as though there
were no other way to control the crisis and we spend over $1 billion every year destroying 'Man's Best Friend'.

Why is this happening in the United States today? The largest contributors to this problem are Backyard
Breeders and Puppy Mills.

The name 'Backyard Breeder' has become very unpopular. Nobody wants to admit they are a backyard
breeder. Many people don't even know they are part of the problem. The only way to stop the needless killing
of dogs is to stop the needless breeding of them.

Every breed of dog recognized by the AKC, UKC or CKC has a written standard, a blueprint of what the
dog should look and act like. These standards were written so that all would know what a quality example of
the breed is and strive to produce dogs that meet or exceed the standard in health, temperament and
appearance. To be sure that you are breeding dogs that meet these standards, your dogs must be judged by
people who have a lifetime of experience among the breed. Do you know the standard of your purebred dog?
Does your dog meet this standard according to an AKC judge? If not, your dog is pet quality. Your dog is to
be loved, cherished, trained, cared for, spoiled and bragged about but it is NEVER to be bred. No matter how
cute or sweet the dog may be, if it is not up to the standard, you have no business breeding it.

If you have a purebred dog, this does not give you the right to breed it. Most purebred dogs are not
breeding quality. If you breed your pet quality dog, you are a backyard breeder. Whether you breed the dog
in your backyard, garage, living room or an expensive hotel room, the term is still backyard breeder. If your pet
quality dog has papers (AKC, UKC, CKC), that's nice but it doesn't change anything. You still don't have the
right to breed it.

If your pet quality dog cost you $500 be glad you had the money to afford it. You still don't have the right to
breed it.

Do you think that you can make your $500 back if you breed your pet quality dog or if your pet is a color or
a size that isn't the breed standard but you just know everyone will want to buy a pup if you breed her? Shame
on you! Now you are a backyard breeder with the purpose of peddling pups for bucks.

If the price for a tail dock or an ear crop may seem high to you, what are you going to do when your
beloved pet needs an emergency C section? Will you even be there to know if she is in trouble? Would you
even be able to recognize the signs before it was too late?

And if you still want to breed your pet quality dog but need to ask who is supposed to cut off the tails and
ears, ask yourself "What in the **** am I thinking?"

Do you think genetic testing is something they used in the OJ trial but has nothing to do with your breeding
career? You are a backyard breeder.

Backyard breeders sell pup's that aren't up to the standard of the breed. They do this for many reasons.
None are good enough reasons to contribute to the killing of the dogs. Period.

Backyard breeders will swear all of their pups went to good homes. They believe this but it's not true.
Some may have been luck enough to go to a good home but more than half will end up dead, in a shelter,
alone on a cold table with a needle sticking out of their leg. Some of those good homes will get tired of the
dog and will just give it away to the first person willing to take it. Some of your beloved dog's children will end
up living alone in a backyard, barking all night, cold and neglected until the owner gets complaints and then the
pup will be dead. Some will be starved and beaten. Some will be bred until they die from it. Some will end up
in a rescue and I will have to find space for them. I will have to teach them that not all humans are bad. I will
remove their fleas and get rid of their worms. I will have them vaccinated for the first time in their lives because
the previous owners neglected to remember. I will spay or neuter the animal to ensure it is not snatched up by
someone looking to make a quick buck. I will do all of these things that the previous owner should have done
because they didn't want to.

Backyard breeders are not responsible pet owners. They think they love the dogs but that isn't really true
because they don't want to bother with all that it takes to breed ethically. They love feeling important when they
say "I breed purebred dogs." but breeding pet quality dogs is not something to be proud of. It is a shame on
our society. It is the reason for the death that occurs in shelters. Why do you want to be part of that?

Do you want to be respected? Spay or neuter your pet dog. There is really no other way. The kinds of
homes that you want for your pets puppies do not want to purchase a pup from you. They are looking for
responsible, respected breeders who are doing something for the breed as a whole. Most of those who will
come running to buy one of your pups are the kind of people I wouldn't give a nasty, aggressive dog to. They
are people who will turn your sweet little puppy into a shelter once the novelty wears off. That is a fact.

Spay or neuter your pets now and tell everyone you know to do the same. Leave breeding to people who
are doing something to better the breed. These people breed for quality, not quantity.

Want to be a respected breeder? Do your research and find an individual who is an educated and
respected member of the dog breeding world. Ask this person to be your mentor. You need to know what you
are doing before you are even ready to begin. Have a savings account ready for any and all problems that you
will encounter. Purchase only top quality bred dogs and plan on showing them. Do everything that your mentor
tells you, he/she has the experience and is not just trying to push you around. Be sure that everything you do
as a breeder meets the standards which have been set for responsible breeders. Or, Don't Breed!
:goodpost::aktion033: Please don't breed we have so many in rescues
 

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If she doesn't go, back in the crate and try again in 10-15 minutes. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Don't forget to reward with food. She may feel more secure if you set up a small pen where she can wander and sniff off leash in the grass. Set a timer...2 minute chance to pee, then back in. Why in the world would your pup potty outside when you are allowing her a comfy place indoors? Makes sense to me! I wouldn't go in an outhouse when I had a nice bathroom inside the house.

Puppies are obnoxious and rude to adult dogs. Let your older dog ignore her and interact on his terms. Be sure he can get away from her.
 

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Emily was that way too,she only associated outdoors w/ potty.If you'd hook her up tp a lesh,she'd freeze and pee right there. Now we got out and go walkies,which sme just loves and no more pee on the leash now.
She loves outside time to play. when we first got them it was November so it was cold and yucky so outside time was just a quick,go potty and right back in.Once we started going walkies,it all changed for the better. I hope this works for you.
 

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Puppies are obnoxious and rude to adult dogs. Let your older dog ignore her and interact on his terms. Be sure he can get away from her.
Geez, isn't that the truth! Piper (17 weeks) gets in Fella's face over...and over...and over. He gives her visual warnings, then growls. Once he snapped at her (air biting, no true bites involved) and she acted like he'd tried to murder her. :blink:

I think what you're going through with the 2 is kind of normal, some personalities are just that way. The less attention you give it, the calmer they'll be.

As far as the pottying, jmm gave sound advice and remember: This too shall pass! :thumbsup:
 
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