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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was eating grapes earlier and Sir N did his usual oh-momma-you-just-GOTTA-share-some-of-those routine. Before I heard that they are toxic, I ALWAYS shared grapes with him. In fact, he had been eating grapes without even one incident for YEARS until I read in these forums that they are toxic. Sir N simply doesn't understand WHY he's been completely cut off. And, since he has eaten so many of them in his past, I am kinda wondering...are they really toxic for EVERY dog? Or is this like soy? Many are allergic, but some aren't.
 

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When a dog is sensitive to grapes, they are VERY toxic... cause death. I gave them to Rosebud back in 1990, before they were a known toxin, and she got very sick from them but it was an intestinal thing that she got over in a few days, not the typical kidney failure that has been reported. I don't even buy grapes now because I'm afraid one will accidentally fall on the floor, etc. and K or C will get it.

This link is an excellent article in pdf format: Grapes and Raisin Toxicity in Dogs

The press release below if from this link:
ASPCA Press Release Re: Grapes

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Issues Nationwide Update: Raisins and Grapes Can Be Toxic To Dogs

Tuesday, July 6, 2004

Since April 2003, the Center handled approximately 140 cases of dogs ingesting raisins or grapes.

Media Contacts: Dana Farbman, CVT
(217)-337-9751
[email protected]

(NEW YORK, NY) July 6, 2004 -- The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center continues to caution dog owners that raisins and grapes may be toxic to some dogs.From April 2003 to April 2004, the Center managed 140 cases, each involving one or more dogs that ingested varying amounts of raisins or grapes. Of these cases, over 50 animals developed clinical signs ranging from vomiting to life-threatening kidney failure, and seven dogs died.

Sarah Wright of Wisconsin lost her two year-old Australian Shepherd / Saint Bernard Mix, Penny (see picture) early this April to kidney failure after Penny ingested approximatelyone cup of raisins."Penny ate the raisins and vomited later that same day," recalls Sarah."I took her in to be evaluated by our local veterinarian, who felt that she was simply experiencing stomach upset, as the clinic was not aware of the potential for toxicity with raisin ingestions in dogs.A few days later, when Penny didn't improve, my veterinarian ran blood tests and found that Penny had developed acute renal failure, and despite efforts to save Penny, she passed away."

Sarah wanted to share her unfortunate loss with others "so that other dog owners can be educated about the toxic potential of grapes and raisins, and avoid having their dogs go through what Penny did." She would also like to urge pet owners to educate themselves about issues pertinent to their pets' health, in order to become an effective advocate for the medical care they receive.

Much is still yet to be discovered about the toxic principle associated with grape and raisin ingestions, as well as the exact mechanism leading to kidney damage in some dogs. It is also not clear if only canines are susceptible to developing a toxicosis, and additionally if only certain dogs are affected, or if chronic, long term ingestions can lead to the same effects as large, acute or single ingestions. As there are still many unknowns with the toxic potential of grapes and raisins, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center advises not giving grapes or raisins to pets in any amount.The ASPCA will continue to monitor this situation, and will provide any additional information as it becomes available. Please call (888) 426-4435 if you have a pet that has ingested grapes or raisins, or you suspect may be experiencing problems.
 

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That is very interesting, when growing up I had a Kelpie x German Shepherd and she would eat all the grapes from our vines that she could reach and she lived to 18 years of age.
With raisins I am wondering if it is the chemicals used to dry the grapes that perhaps could be the cause of poisoning, just wondering that.
We eat a lot of grapes ourselves and often give one to Scooby but he never eats them he just plays with them then leaves them alone so he obviously isn't keen.
I tend to agree that not all dogs are the same and some may have an allergy to certain foods that others may in fact enjoy and have no problems at all.
One thing I would be thinking is perhaps if the dog ate a large amount at one time that in itself could have been the problem.
I can't remember where I read it but I am sure that in the early days of the Maltese breed and in Malta they used to actually feed them grapes as part of their diet. Maybe with all the careful breeding and trying to breed smaller and less robust types of dog we are doing the breed more harm as they seem to have developed more allergies and internal problems by doing this. Just a thought.

Scooby is not small by the standard as a matter of fact he is way over weight and too big to ever be a show potential, but he is a pure Maltese and he is healthy and strong and that to me is the most important thing.
 

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OMG!!! Grapes are toxic?!!?!?

Someone needs to start at Toxic Foods thread. I'm telling my husband about grapes and chocolate. He's always giving Molly bits of human food when I'm not looking.
 

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What about tomatoes? Last night when we were outside eating our dinner Lacey went up to one of the tomato plants and pulled a tomato off the vine and ate the whole thing! She had some awful gas last night. She is acting like her normal self. I have never had a dog eat tomato, let alone pull it off the vine and eat it.
 

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Originally posted by Laceys mom@Sep 22 2005, 12:52 PM
What about tomatoes?  Last night when we were outside eating our  dinner Lacey went up to one of the tomato plants and pulled a tomato off the vine and ate the whole thing!  She had some awful gas last night.  She is acting like her normal self.  I have never had a dog eat tomato, let alone pull it off the vine and eat it.
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Here's more info from ASPCA, including info on tomatoes which I bolded:

Pet Poison Prevention Tips from ASPCA

Animal Poison Control Center Toxicology Bulletins: Pet Poison Prevention Tips

Friday, January 11, 2002

Learn some simple ways to prevent your companion animal from becoming poisoned.

Contact: ASPCA Media Relations
(212) 876 7700 ext. 4655

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(New York) January 11, 2002 -- Learn some simple ways to prevent your companion animal from becoming poisoned.

Be aware of the plants you have in your home and yard. The ingestion of azalea, oleander, castor bean, sago palm, Easter lily (in cats only), or yew plant material by an animal can be fatal.

Never allow your pets to have access to the areas in which cleaning agents are being used or stored. Cleaning agents have a variety of properties; some may only cause mild stomach upset, but others can cause severe burns of the tongue, mouth and stomach.

Store all cleaners, pesticides, and medications in a secured area.
Most baits contain ingredients that can attract your pets. When using rat, mouse, snail or slug baits, or ant or roach traps, place the products in areas that are inaccessible to your companion animals.

Never give your companion animals medication unless you are directed to do so by a veterinarian. Many medications that are safe for humans can be deadly for animals. For example, one extra strength (500mg) acetaminophen tablet could be fatal to a cat.

Keep all prescription and over-the-counter drugs out of your pets' reach, preferably in closed cabinets. Pain killers, cold medicines, anti-cancer drugs, antidepressants, vitamins and diet pills are all examples of human medications that can be lethal to animals, even in small doses.

Food items that potentially could be dangerous to pets include onions, onion powder, chocolate (bakers, semi sweet, milk, dark), alcoholic beverages, yeast dough, coffee (grounds, beans, chocolate covered espresso beans, tea (caffeine), salt, macadamia nuts, hops (used in home beer brewing), tomato leaves and stems (green parts), rhubarb leaves, avocados (toxic to birds, mice, rabbits, horses, cattle, and dairy goats), cigarettes, cigars, snuff, chewing tobacco, moldy or spoiled foods.

Many common household items can be dangerous to animals. Mothballs, potpourri oils, pennies, homemade play dough, fabric softener sheets, dishwashing detergent, and batteries.

Automotive products such as gasoline, oil and antifreeze should be stored in areas that are inaccessible to your pets. As little as one teaspoon of antifreeze can be deadly to a cat; less than one tablespoon can be lethal to a 20-pound dog.
Before buying a flea product, consult your veterinarian, especially when treating sick, debilitated or pregnant pets.

Read all of the information on the label before using a product on your pet or in your home. Always follow the directions.

If a product is for use only on dogs, it should never be used on cats; if a product is for use only on cats, it should never be used on dogs. Never use permethrin spot on products (which are labeled for dogs only) on your cat.

Make sure your companion animals do not enter areas in which insecticidal foggers or house sprays have been applied for the period of time indicated on the label.

If you are uncertain about the proper usage of any product, contact the manufacturer and/or your veterinarian for instructions.
 

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Wow thanks for the info. i also didnt know milk was bad! i have let Scrapps lick my cereal bowl when im all finished a couple times. NO MORE!!!
 

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I scanned the info real fast and it looks like tomato leaves and stems are dangerous but not the actual tomato. I asked a few people at work and they told me their dogs do the same. Never have I seen a dog eat a tomato.

Thanks for the info.
 

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Originally posted by jeanette@Sep 22 2005, 03:22 PM
Wow thanks for the info. i also didnt know milk was bad! i have let Scrapps lick my cereal bowl when im all finished a couple times.  NO MORE!!!
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The reason milk is bad is because many dog do not tolerate it well. Sassy has a little lick of milk here and there.

I did learn one thing from this thread. That caffine is bad. Sassy has 1 teaspoon of coffee a lot of mornings. She is so patient waiting, it is so cute. Guess she is going to have to stop drinking coffee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Sir N used to LOVE to have a dish of warmed milk during cold winter mornings while I was drinking my hot cocoa. I'm really starting to think he's invincible. :D He doesn't drink milk anymore because I don't. Wait a minute...Little C has had dishes of warmed milk a few times as well, I think. Anyway, now we're all three really into soymilk and if I dare to make myself some oatmeal and not give them their own share of the soymilk, man, the GUILT TRIP they lay on me!

Oh, and for the poster with the tomato eating dog....Sir N does the same thing. One time when we were at my mother's house, she caught him swiping tomatoes off the vine. He likes only the very little ones whole. Otherwise, he prefers them to be sliced. :D I haven't tried giving any to Little C because she's just so danged picky about everything. I always assume she won't eat it. Well, there is one thing she isn't picky about...fingernail clippings. *eew how gross smilie here*
 
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