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Short of an MRI or CT scan, there is no genetic test for hydrocephalus (in a live dog). I'm really curious what test the stud owner is doing...will you find out and pass it along?

My basics list that would be ideal for Maltese includes:
Serum chemistry profile
Pre- and post-prandial bile acid assay
Thyroid panel to Michigan
OFA Patellas
Annual CERF/ACVO exam

I know there is a genetic marker test for glycogen storage disease, but I haven't heard of anyone doing it...I've never actually heard of a dog with it though I'm sure they're around.

I had an interesting conversation about one of my own dogs with Dr. Sharon Center up at Cornell a little while back. We were discussing his tremors for a second time (he has intermittent tremors, primarily in his hind end). She asked a lot of questions about how intelligent I thought he was. Well, he has a couple legs in agility and knows a ton of tricks...he does problem solving with clicker games and food toys. I think he's pretty smart for a Maltese, though he's no border collie. She said dogs with hydrocephalus often seem slightly "dull" or not very smart. I never knew that...just an interesting tidbit.
 

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Originally posted by JMM@Jul 7 2005, 07:00 PM
Short of an MRI or CT scan, there is no genetic test for hydrocephalus (in a live dog). I'm really curious what test the stud owner is doing...will you find out and pass it along?

My basics list that would be ideal for Maltese includes:
Serum chemistry profile
Pre- and post-prandial bile acid assay
Thyroid panel to Michigan
OFA Patellas
Annual CERF/ACVO exam

I know there is a genetic marker test for glycogen storage disease, but I haven't heard of anyone doing it...I've never actually heard of a dog with it though I'm sure they're around.

I had an interesting conversation about one of my own dogs with Dr. Sharon Center up at Cornell a little while back. We were discussing his tremors for a second time (he has intermittent tremors, primarily in his hind end). She asked a lot of questions about how intelligent I thought he was. Well, he has a couple legs in agility and knows a ton of tricks...he does problem solving with clicker games and food toys. I think he's pretty smart for a Maltese, though he's no border collie. She said dogs with hydrocephalus often seem slightly "dull" or not very smart. I never knew that...just an interesting tidbit.
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I have also heard that it can make them dull. I'm not sure of any genetic test that can be ran just for water baby. I got the impression that the stud owner was going to just rerun all of the test to make sure all of his levels and what not are ok. She wanted to weigh out the possibliity that he was having some kind of sudden change that might cause this. She has 2 other females due from the same male soon. If they had problems she would let me know.

I once saw an adult chihuahua about 3 years at our clinic that was a water baby and it made me sad that they keept him going. He had trouble walking,doiing his business, just about everyting he struggled with. He was later put to sleep when the owner passed on. Her kids brought him in they felt it was best he go.

i would have never wanted prissys pup to have that kind of life. Prissy knew from the start there was something she just didnt pay attention to it. I think its amazing how they sence these things
 

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Prissy knew from the start there was something she just didnt pay attention to it. I think its amazing how they sence these things[/B]
They know and I think they ignore the pups that are sick so they can die.

This is an extract from DogWatch :

Sick puppies
Many dog owners simply do not realize that the mother killed and ate a sick or malformed puppy within the first several days of life. Often the dog's owner does not notice that the puppies are ill ; but the mother will detect erratic temperature changes in the pup, abnormal behaviors, or body malformations that will cause her to destroy and eat the pup. This is a normal, genetically programmed response to maintain the health of the species. Some genetic abnormalities - which may not be noted by the dog's owner - can also contribute to overt aggression toward new pup.


Since Sassy's first 3 litters were all OK and this latest diagnostic of the dead pup, your first hunch about the stud does not seem out of wack anymore. I am curious to know too what is going to happen to the 2 other litters he fathered.
 

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Originally posted by MalteseJane@Jul 7 2005, 08:50 PM
QUOTE
Prissy knew from the start there was something she just didnt pay attention to it. I think its amazing how they sence these things
They know and I think they ignore the pups that are sick so they can die.

This is an extract from DogWatch :

Sick puppies
Many dog owners simply do not realize that the mother killed and ate a sick or malformed puppy within the first several days of life. Often the dog's owner does not notice that the puppies are ill ; but the mother will detect erratic temperature changes in the pup, abnormal behaviors, or body malformations that will cause her to destroy and eat the pup. This is a normal, genetically programmed response to maintain the health of the species. Some genetic abnormalities - which may not be noted by the dog's owner - can also contribute to overt aggression toward new pup.


Since Sassy's first 3 litters were all OK and this latest diagnostic of the dead pup, your first hunch about the stud does not seem out of wack anymore. I am curious to know too what is going to happen to the 2 other litters he fathered.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=79216
[/B][/QUOTE]


I'm also unsure if the stud owner will tell me the truth. The two females are not part of luvnpaws. I dont know if they are her dogs or an outside breeders. She seems like a great person but I know she could lie and say everything is fine just to put the blame elsewhere. There would be no way of knowing the truth. Her vet gave her wonderful reccommendations. Who knows?

the wonder of mother nature is amazing. The way mothers sense things is just wow. Prissy was not aggressive she just postioned her self and the boy up far away from the girl. If we held her to the teat to nurse prissy would let her but as soon as I walk away she moved
how they know that
 

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Originally posted by sassy14830+Jul 7 2005, 09:34 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-MalteseJane
@Jul 7 2005, 08:50 PM
QUOTE
<div class='quotemain'>Prissy knew from the start there was something she just didnt pay attention to it. I think its amazing how they sence these things
They know and I think they ignore the pups that are sick so they can die.

This is an extract from DogWatch :

Sick puppies
Many dog owners simply do not realize that the mother killed and ate a sick or malformed puppy within the first several days of life. Often the dog's owner does not notice that the puppies are ill ; but the mother will detect erratic temperature changes in the pup, abnormal behaviors, or body malformations that will cause her to destroy and eat the pup. This is a normal, genetically programmed response to maintain the health of the species. Some genetic abnormalities - which may not be noted by the dog's owner - can also contribute to overt aggression toward new pup.



Since Sassy's first 3 litters were all OK and this latest diagnostic of the dead pup, your first hunch about the stud does not seem out of wack anymore. I am curious to know too what is going to happen to the 2 other litters he fathered.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=79216
[/B][/QUOTE]


I'm also unsure if the stud owner will tell me the truth. The two females are not part of luvnpaws. I dont know if they are her dogs or an outside breeders. She seems like a great person but I know she could lie and say everything is fine just to put the blame elsewhere. There would be no way of knowing the truth. Her vet gave her wonderful reccommendations. Who knows?

the wonder of mother nature is amazing. The way mothers sense things is just wow. Prissy was not aggressive she just postioned her self and the boy up far away from the girl. If we held her to the teat to nurse prissy would let her but as soon as I walk away she moved
how they know that
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=79238
[/B][/QUOTE]


"I dont know if they are her dogs or an outside breeders. She seems like a great person but I know she could lie and say everything is fine just to put the blame elsewhere."

I haven't gotten involved in this drama so far even though there were many red flags as far as I'm concerned but I have to tell you you're really starting to sound a little crazy. Your story just keeps evolving. It's like a soap opra. Thank God it's Prissy's last litter. Therapy might be a good idea.
 
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