Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner
1 - 20 of 80 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a female she is about 4 to 5 lbs my husband got her for me as a wedding gift she is nine months old she acts like our baby lol she thinks she owns me my question. Is is it ok to breed her with my moms male he is about 8 to 10 lbs. I just dont want anything to happen to her it would kill us both
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Oh no.....I'm sorry, but you really shouldn't breed your pups.....many people think that it's just so easy...but with these little guy's you never know if complication's will arise....I'm sure more people will come on here and give you some very good advice about this.You would be wise to listen to them...Stay here and you will learn alot about maltese, as we all love our babies. And we also just love pictures.....so welcome to the forum and show us your pups....please.

Hugs, Blanche
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,156 Posts
Congrats on your wedding.
These little ones make wonderful companion animals.
They give so much and add so much love to your life.
Breeding an animal, takes its life into your hands.
Meaning the best person to breed has studied and is very knowledgable.
We have some members who show their Malts
and breed them (the ones who pass all the tests, temperment and health wise) for the next generation of show dogs.
Does this interest you at all?
If not, then having a "pet" Maltese can be rewarding enough! :)

Of course, they're not pets! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Hi and welcome! there is a wealth of information on this website, including many reasons why it may not be wise to breed your pet dog.

I dont mean to be harsh but you wouldn't give medical advise to an expecting mother or deliver a baby because you probably do not have the education and training to do it. breeding a dog is similar - leave it to the experts.

do research on 'back yard breeders' and puppy mills to get more info on why it is not a good idea and what the health problems are for the mother and the puppies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,528 Posts
Welcome to SM!!!

I think a 9month old puppy is much too young to breed. Personally I'm all for population control- in humans and dogs so unless you're breeding for show (and even that I have issues with-but that's jmo), I don't see why people want to breed their dogs. There are so many dogs out there as it is. Also I think it's very very dangerous. If I were 5lbs, I wouldn't want to get pregnant!! lol!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Once when I was younger we had a pet quality Lhasa who liked to wonder a bit. She apparently found a mate and turned up pregnant. The birth did not go well because the puppies were too large and we lost her as a result. Please spay your Maltese. I know you think she's special, that's fine, we all think our babies are special. But please consider it as a favor to your dog you will save her a world of trouble and yourself a world of heartbreak should things go wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
:Welcome 2: How great that you're doing your research before making a decision. So many educated folks and breeders on here so you came to the right place!
 

·
Premium Member
Sandi-- w/Kitzel (Kitzi) & Lisel (Lisi)
Joined
·
17,979 Posts
Welcome!:Welcome 2:
To answer the question you asked "definitely not----you would endanger her life." It sounds like you have grown to love her very much. I am glad you are asking good questions and I think this forum will help you to understand the "whys" and "why nots" involved in breeding. :yes: I hope you stay and keep asking questions like this. :thumbsup: Genetics, pedigrees and research are crucial when it comes to breeding. You might also want to befriend some breeders and pick their brains.
BTW---has your baby done the BAT (Bile Acids Test) which is one crucial test for liver shunting/disease---IF not---call your vet and get it set up ASAP. There are lots of proactive things that can be done to avert serious medical issues. We can't dodge all the bullets but we can get off the target range.
Looking fwd. to photos of your baby---again welcome.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,223 Posts
Welcome to Spoiled Maltese.

Honestly? :unsure: It is a huge risk to breed any dog. So many things can and do go wrong. It sounds as though you cherish her as your beloved pet. If so, then breeding her should scare you to your toes. :shocked:

Also, I hope you would never consider breeding your girl at her young age. A female should never be bred until fully mature. That is usually the second heat. Preferably at least 18 months old.

I, too, have recently considered what it would mean to breed my girls. I bought them on show contracts. I finished one to her championship and am hopeful I will soon finish the other. It is expected that I will breed both of these girls when the time is right.

I have been a Maltese owner for nearly 20 years. I am trying to learn everything I can to make sure that when I do this I will be taking every possible precaution. I have been attending toy breed puppy births. I have read dozens of books. Attended seminars. Scheduled a consultation on reproduction with my vet. Talked to my more experienced mentors in the breed. No matter how much I can possibly prepare--It is SCARY. And the more I learn the more scared I become. This is not a decision to EVER be taken lightly.

Beyond the actual breeding and whelping, you also have to consider the responsibility to every dog you bring into this world. You do not want to contribute to the pet overpopulation problem. So if you breed, you have to be willing to keep those dogs in your home or place them in "ideal" homes and be ready take them back for life. Is that something you could commit to? What about possible life changes for you down the road? What if you are not able to take on more dogs, so a new owner resorts to dumping a dog you bred into a shelter?

Do you know the health history of the dogs in the pedigree of both sire and dam for several generations back? What would happen if you breed your girl and one of the puppies came up with a serious genetic defect? There are many in the breed. Maltese have problems with Liver Shunts, GME, PDA and more. Not only would it be heartbreaking for you, it could be heartbreaking for the new pet owner who acquired the pup from you. A responsible breeder would always be there standing by ready to deal with any of these risks. But a responsible breeder would also minimize them by studying the pedigrees and learning as much as possible about the health history of all the dogs going at least 4/5 generations back. A responsible breeder would also have as much health information on her own dogs collected as possible: a Bile Acid test, Patella check, etc.

Frankly, if the stud you are talking about bringing your girl to is over the standard weight, it sounds as though he may not be a well bred Maltese of quality. In fact, most people believe that if you are going to breed a dog then the breeding should be done to produce Maltese that are reflective of the best characteristics of the breed. For instance, are you prepared to deal with puppy buyers who are later disappointed and feel deceived when their puppy grows up to be a 10 pound dog? Or whose coat is more cotton than silk. Puppy buyers have a right to expect when they buy a pure-bred Maltese, that dog is a very nice example of the breed.

I would ask you, what are the reasons you want to breed? If it is because you love your puppy, and want to have another just like her, then that is not a good reason. If she did not come from a good breeder then she also should not be bred due to the less than careful health history analysis she may have had among other things. If she came from a good breeder chances are you can get close relatives by going back to that breeder. However, responsible breeders do not place dogs in pet homes without requiring a spay and neuter agreement. This ensures that the lines they have worked hard to develop are protected from haphazard breeding.

I hope you will take my thoughts and suggestions here in the spirit with which they are intended. I hope you will continue to visit SM and read and get to know us here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
WELCOME ...in answer to your question .. your mums maltese is to big .if you still want to breed your female maltese,.please try and take as much time as you possibly can reading about breeding dogs, and
looking at stud dogs pedigrees ect ,you need to find out also if the male dog has a clean health cert too ..
small maltese females need to be breed with a small maltese ,
Do not breed your female with a larger maltese as the pups will also be large
so you will have problems with the welping [birth]
smaller malts breed with larger maltese tend to need more c.sections so bare this in mind ...
not forgetting to have your female checked by a vet first ,as sometimes small females are just to small
to give birth..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,092 Posts
Welcome to Spoiled Maltese.

Honestly? :unsure: It is a huge risk to breed any dog. So many things can and do go wrong. It sounds as though you cherish her as your beloved pet. If so, then breeding her should scare you to your toes. :shocked:

Also, I hope you would never consider breeding your girl at her young age. A female should never be bred until fully mature. That is usually the second heat. Preferably at least 18 months old.

I, too, have recently considered what it would mean to breed my girls. I bought them on show contracts. I finished one to her championship and am hopeful I will soon finish the other. It is expected that I will breed both of these girls when the time is right.

I have been a Maltese owner for nearly 20 years. I am trying to learn everything I can to make sure that when I do this I will be taking every possible precaution. I have been attending toy breed puppy births. I have read dozens of books. Attended seminars. Scheduled a consultation on reproduction with my vet. Talked to my more experienced mentors in the breed. No matter how much I can possibly prepare--It is SCARY. And the more I learn the more scared I become. This is not a decision to EVER be taken lightly.

Beyond the actual breeding and whelping, you also have to consider the responsibility to every dog you bring into this world. You do not want to contribute to the pet overpopulation problem. So if you breed, you have to be willing to keep those dogs in your home or place them in "ideal" homes and be ready take them back for life. Is that something you could commit to? What about possible life changes for you down the road? What if you are not able to take on more dogs, so a new owner resorts to dumping a dog you bred into a shelter?

Do you know the health history of the dogs in the pedigree of both sire and dam for several generations back? What would happen if you breed your girl and one of the puppies came up with a serious genetic defect? There are many in the breed. Maltese have problems with Liver Shunts, GME, PDA and more. Not only would it be heartbreaking for you, it could be heartbreaking for the new pet owner who acquired the pup from you. A responsible breeder would always be there standing by ready to deal with any of these risks. But a responsible breeder would also minimize them by studying the pedigrees and learning as much as possible about the health history of all the dogs going at least 4/5 generations back. A responsible breeder would also have as much health information on her own dogs collected as possible: a Bile Acid test, Patella check, etc.

Frankly, if the stud you are talking about bringing your girl to is over the standard weight, it sounds as though he may not be a well bred Maltese of quality. In fact, most people believe that if you are going to breed a dog then the breeding should be done to produce Maltese that are reflective of the best characteristics of the breed. For instance, are you prepared to deal with puppy buyers who are later disappointed and feel deceived when their puppy grows up to be a 10 pound dog? Or whose coat is more cotton than silk. Puppy buyers have a right to expect when they buy a pure-bred Maltese, that dog is a very nice example of the breed.

I would ask you, what are the reasons you want to breed? If it is because you love your puppy, and want to have another just like her, then that is not a good reason. If she did not come from a good breeder then she also should not be bred due to the less than careful health history analysis she may have had among other things. If she came from a good breeder chances are you can get close relatives by going back to that breeder. However, responsible breeders do not place dogs in pet homes without requiring a spay and neuter agreement. This ensures that the lines they have worked hard to develop are protected from haphazard breeding.

I hope you will take my thoughts and suggestions here in the spirit with which they are intended. I hope you will continue to visit SM and read and get to know us here.
:goodpost:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,092 Posts
:Welcome 1: You have been given excellent advice and I do hope you will stick around. Both of my girls are tiny. One is just under 4 pounds and the other is 4 and 1/2 pounds. Both of them came from a reputable show breeder. One of them was held back for show, but because she is so tiny, the breeder did not want her bred.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh no I'm not gonna breed her right now. My mom thought it wouldnt hurt but I wanted to make sure cause she one of our babies she even sleeps on the bed with us she pushes my husband off his pillow and takes it as hers. She even sits in my lap and watch tv with me. I have a shih Tzu who is my other baby I breed her but the Pups I make sure go to a good home. I play with from the time they are weeks they get loved on and we get attached and make sure they go to good homes. I'm not sure if i want to breed kandie it nice to get info on them when we got her the person wanted to sell her for gas money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,623 Posts
Oh no I'm not gonna breed her right now. My mom thought it wouldnt hurt but I wanted to make sure cause she one of our babies she even sleeps on the bed with us she pushes my husband off his pillow and takes it as hers. She even sits in my lap and watch tv with me. I have a shih Tzu who is my other baby I breed her but the Pups I make sure go to a good home. I play with from the time they are weeks they get loved on and we get attached and make sure they go to good homes. I'm not sure if i want to breed kandie it nice to get info on them when we got her the person wanted to sell her for gas money.
So, safe to say you didn't get her from a reputable breeder. I hope all of this good info isn't lost on you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
:smcry:
Oh no I'm not gonna breed her right now. My mom thought it wouldnt hurt but I wanted to make sure cause she one of our babies she even sleeps on the bed with us she pushes my husband off his pillow and takes it as hers. She even sits in my lap and watch tv with me. I have a shih Tzu who is my other baby I breed her but the Pups I make sure go to a good home. I play with from the time they are weeks they get loved on and we get attached and make sure they go to good homes. I'm not sure if i want to breed kandie it nice to get info on them when we got her the person wanted to sell her for gas money.

This is so sad, please look at petfinder and see all the beautiful dogs that need good loving forever homes. Do you really want to add to this allready huge problem of homeless pets. You have been given great advice by people who love their dogs. Please spay your girls, it will be the greatest gift you can to them:wub:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,369 Posts
We have enough poorly bred dogs in the shelters. DON'T add to the problem. Be part of the solution. Use your ability to find good homes by placing shelter dogs, who have been dumped. They deserve it. Stop breeding your Tzu, as well. It's the right thing to do.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
754 Posts
I think the responses you've been receiving up to your follow-up post are because it really sounded like you're new to the idea of breeding to be asking the question you did. People have been gently trying to steer you away from breeding your malt as a result, as most people here would feel that breeding your dog should not be a casual thing. Reputable breeders take it very seriously and for good reason.

Generally, to breed your maltese, most here would feel that it goes far beyond her safety due to the size of the stud and resulting puppies. People here not only love their maltese--they love the maltese breed, so it's important to most that the breed always be improved upon and not needlessly put into risky situations for any other reason.

There are so many things that can go wrong and a lot of sites list the cons and responsibilities of breeding dogs. Have you read these kinds of lists before? Here's an example:

So You Want To Be A Breeder??

**Edited to add: My Tiffy probably wouldn't be here today if I hadn't gotten her spayed when I did. I didn't spay her as early as most do... I waited until over a year. When the vet went in to spay her, she discovered that her uterus was a pus-filled mess of pyometra. (This is an infection of the uterus that usually older unspayed bitches get and is often fatal.) Luckily, the pus was contained during surgery and she pulled through and recovered with antibiotics. Spaying has so many health benefits, as does not breeding. I really hope you spay both your girls too. :)
 
1 - 20 of 80 Posts
Top