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Discussion Starter #1
Hi! My ethel has been not really coughing but wheezing lately - espscially in her sleep. She has a sebaceutous cyst on her chest but the vet said its nothing... could hit have gotten into her lungs?

I have asthma - do dogs???

just wondering.. bye!

Lucy & Ethel's mom
 

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I didn't know if dogs could have asthma so I did a google search for "dog asthma"t. Here is what I found out:
Dog Health


Asthma
Asthma is a disease that can affect both dogs and cats. It results in an obstruction of the airways when the bronchi (the air passages in the lungs) fill up with mucous and go into spasms (bronchoconstriction). It is far more common in cats than dogs. Asthma is more common in Siamese and Himalayan cat breeds.

Symptoms
Dogs and cats of any age can get asthma, but it occurs more commonly in young and middle-aged pets. The primary sign is coughing, which cat owners sometimes confuse with attempts to cough up hairballs. Owners often report wheezing and, in rare cases, respiratory distress occurs resulting in open mouth breathing and purple gums and tongue. This latter condition is an emergency. In some cases, pets may become lethargic and stop eating, resulting in weight loss. Between episodes, pets are usually normal. Triggers for asthma may include second hand smoke, litter dust, air pollution and certain fragrances.

Treatments
To diagnose asthma, it is necessary to perform an X-ray of the chest and perform additional tests to rule out other respiratory problems. These may include heartworm tests, blood counts and chemistries, and bronchial lavage. Once a diagnosis of allergic bronchitis has been made, treatment often consists of steroids, antihistamines, bronchodilators, perhaps antibiotics or a combination of these drugs. In severe attacks, oxygen therapy may be necessary.

The prognosis for control of this disease is excellent, with most pets living happy and normal lives with the help of life-long medication. Unless an underlying cause can be determined, a cure is unlikely. Your veterinarian can help to determine both the cause of asthma as well as the treatment options best suited to your pet.[/B]
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Asthma is not a common finding in dogs. In a puppy, I would be worried about pneumonia or heart disease. Has a chest radiograph been taken? Does the dog have a heart murmur?[/B]

Ethel is 3 - she does have an irregular heartbeat - always has. She is in remission from AIHA - but otherwise has been healthy - thank GOD it was a miracle she survivied - AIHA WAS QUITE ENOUGH!

WOW!!!! THANKS!!!!! I didn;t know - i;ll keep an eye on her - she has been around a lot of dust lately as i am redoing my apartment... that could be it.. .like mommy like malt! I will keep and eye on her and see what happens when this is over... thanks!

Susan, Lucy and Ethel


I didn't know if dogs could have asthma so I did a google search for "dog asthma"t. Here is what I found out:
QUOTE
Dog Health


Asthma
Asthma is a disease that can affect both dogs and cats. It results in an obstruction of the airways when the bronchi (the air passages in the lungs) fill up with mucous and go into spasms (bronchoconstriction). It is far more common in cats than dogs. Asthma is more common in Siamese and Himalayan cat breeds.

Symptoms
Dogs and cats of any age can get asthma, but it occurs more commonly in young and middle-aged pets. The primary sign is coughing, which cat owners sometimes confuse with attempts to cough up hairballs. Owners often report wheezing and, in rare cases, respiratory distress occurs resulting in open mouth breathing and purple gums and tongue. This latter condition is an emergency. In some cases, pets may become lethargic and stop eating, resulting in weight loss. Between episodes, pets are usually normal. Triggers for asthma may include second hand smoke, litter dust, air pollution and certain fragrances.

Treatments
To diagnose asthma, it is necessary to perform an X-ray of the chest and perform additional tests to rule out other respiratory problems. These may include heartworm tests, blood counts and chemistries, and bronchial lavage. Once a diagnosis of allergic bronchitis has been made, treatment often consists of steroids, antihistamines, bronchodilators, perhaps antibiotics or a combination of these drugs. In severe attacks, oxygen therapy may be necessary.

The prognosis for control of this disease is excellent, with most pets living happy and normal lives with the help of life-long medication. Unless an underlying cause can be determined, a cure is unlikely. Your veterinarian can help to determine both the cause of asthma as well as the treatment options best suited to your pet.[/B]
[/B][/QUOTE]
 
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