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We've been searching for a retiree from breeding or showing. We would love to go with a puppy but find that younger adults need a great home as well. Therefore, we decided to put this post out there.

We live outside of Boston with a flat yard. We are a family of 6 that includes
grandparents. We've been waiting for 2 years as the deal with our daughters was to wait until the oldest girl turned 10 y/o. We have 2 girls, 10 and 8y/o, that have been patient, pet sitting and researching on the right breed.

Sex of the maltese is not as important as the temperament, health and personality of the dog. We have no intention of breeding or showing and would spay/neuter at the earliest opportunity.

We are willing to travel within reason to see the breed and dog. Please let us know if you do have a young adult that would be a fit for our family.

This board has been very informative and supportive in our search. So thank you all!!

Best,
Jason and family
 

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We've been searching for a retiree from breeding or showing. We would love to go with a puppy but find that younger adults need a great home as well. Therefore, we decided to put this post out there.

We live outside of Boston with a flat yard. We are a family of 6 that includes
grandparents. We've been waiting for 2 years as the deal with our daughters was to wait until the oldest girl turned 10 y/o. We have 2 girls, 10 and 8y/o, that have been patient, pet sitting and researching on the right breed.

Sex of the maltese is not as important as the temperament, health and personality of the dog. We have no intention of breeding or showing and would spay/neuter at the earliest opportunity.

We are willing to travel within reason to see the breed and dog. Please let us know if you do have a young adult that would be a fit for our family.

This board has been very informative and supportive in our search. So thank you all!!

Best,
Jason and family
I don't quite understand the reason for the post above since the same basic post appeared in a thread this morning. :unsure:

There are a couple of things to be aware of when adopting a retiree, or teenage pup. All retirees from an ethical show breeder will already have been altered (spay/neuter), clipped down, UTD on vaccines, and be accompanied with copies of medical records when you take possession of the dog. Patience from you is necessary so the pup can adjust to the new home and new rules. Potty training will be potty training 101. Teenagers, and those being held back as show prospects will be sold already altered, or with a spay/neuter agreement contract, UTD on vaccines, and have had any retained baby teeth removed, and copies of med records if applicable. Potty training again is patience, consistency, and patience. :)

Another fact to consider is: Since dogs are pack animals the girls want to be in charge, be more dominate, while the boys bond more with their owners, and closer with children. Boys can be dressed up cute just like the girls too. :wub:

I may have omitted some things, but I'm sure someone else will add to it. Good Luck in your search - ask a lot of questions when you do your research. Please read this: MALTESE BREEDERS - How to find and evaulate
 

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I don't quite understand the reason for the post above since the same basic post appeared in a thread this morning. :unsure:

There are a couple of things to be aware of when adopting a retiree, or teenage pup. All retirees from an ethical show breeder will already have been altered (spay/neuter), clipped down, UTD on vaccines, and be accompanied with copies of medical records when you take possession of the dog. Patience from you is necessary so the pup can adjust to the new home and new rules. Potty training will be potty training 101. Teenagers, and those being held back as show prospects will be sold already altered, or with a spay/neuter agreement contract, UTD on vaccines, and have had any retained baby teeth removed, and copies of med records if applicable. Potty training again is patience, consistency, and patience. :)

Another fact to consider is: Since dogs are pack animals the girls want to be in charge, be more dominate, while the boys bond more with their owners, and closer with children. Boys can be dressed up cute just like the girls too. :wub:

I may have omitted some things, but I'm sure someone else will add to it. Good Luck in your search - ask a lot of questions when you do your research. Please read this: MALTESE BREEDERS - How to find and evaulate
Marsha,

Why do the breeders have the retirees shaved down? Sorry if this is a stupid question - just wondering why they shave them so short (or, at least, most of them look very short.)
 

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Marsha,

Why do the breeders have the retirees shaved down? Sorry if this is a stupid question - just wondering why they shave them so short (or, at least, most of them look very short.)
Allie - I asked that same question last year too. As I recall, since they aren't showing they can have a shorter easier coat since the breeder probably has a few full coats to deal with on ones they're still showing. Also for whelping - easier for puppies and all for them not to have that long hair. Okay experts - am I right or wrong? I think I recalled it correctly. Always learning:)
 

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Marsha,

Why do the breeders have the retirees shaved down? Sorry if this is a stupid question - just wondering why they shave them so short (or, at least, most of them look very short.)
Frankly I'm not sure, but I think it's because they have been restricted for so long. Breeders clip them down to give them freedom from extensive grooming sessions, and most likely believe the new owner wouldn't want to keep the dog in full coat anyway.

Me? I'd like to have the dog in the full coat. :thumbsup:
 

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I don't quite understand the reason for the post above since the same basic post appeared in a thread this morning. :unsure:

There are a couple of things to be aware of when adopting a retiree, or teenage pup. All retirees from an ethical show breeder will already have been altered (spay/neuter), clipped down, UTD on vaccines, and be accompanied with copies of medical records when you take possession of the dog. Patience from you is necessary so the pup can adjust to the new home and new rules. Potty training will be potty training 101. Teenagers, and those being held back as show prospects will be sold already altered, or with a spay/neuter agreement contract, UTD on vaccines, and have had any retained baby teeth removed, and copies of med records if applicable. Potty training again is patience, consistency, and patience. :)

Another fact to consider is: Since dogs are pack animals the girls want to be in charge, be more dominate, while the boys bond more with their owners, and closer with children. Boys can be dressed up cute just like the girls too. :wub:

I may have omitted some things, but I'm sure someone else will add to it. Good Luck in your search - ask a lot of questions when you do your research. Please read this: MALTESE BREEDERS - How to find and evaulate
:thumbsup: I agree. You got great advice in your earlier thread:

http://spoiledmaltese.com/forum/56-breeders/109983-finally-kids-old-enough-massachusetts.html

Just an FYI, most reputable show breeders prefer to place their retirees with someone who has has Maltese before. Many won't place a retiree in a home where she will be the only dog. Retirees are special needs dogs like rescues. As Marsha said, potty training regression and other behavioral issues are to be expected. Adult dogs, whether they are from a show breeder or a rescue group, have adjustment issues. Patience and experience are very important.
 

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Marsha,

My earlier post was a bit general. Whereas this thread is really seeking out breeders with retirees. However, I am new to the board so I may not know all the rules.

If this thread is redundant, please delete. Either way, I am very grateful and appreciative to the board for the endless feedback and the great resources.

:innocent:
 

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Marsha,

My earlier post was a bit general. Whereas this thread is really seeking out breeders with retirees. However, I am new to the board so I may not know all the rules.

If this thread is redundant, please delete. Either way, I am very grateful and appreciative to the board for the endless feedback and the great resources.

:innocent:
You may not be aware that SM does not permit live animal sales. We are not going to find a Maltese for you. You must do the work yourself. I'd contact Mary H or any of the breeders on the AMA website and start networking.

American Maltese Association
 

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Allie - I asked that same question last year too. As I recall, since they aren't showing they can have a shorter easier coat since the breeder probably has a few full coats to deal with on ones they're still showing. Also for whelping - easier for puppies and all for them not to have that long hair. Okay experts - am I right or wrong? I think I recalled it correctly. Always learning:)

You are correct on why the retiree's coat is shorter. I personally love a long flowing coat, but can understand why a breeder would cut the retiree's hair. I know i can't wait for Reese's hair to grow so i can put bows in her hair.
 

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Marsha,

Why do the breeders have the retirees shaved down? Sorry if this is a stupid question - just wondering why they shave them so short (or, at least, most of them look very short.)
Hi Allie,

I generally put my dogs in puppy cuts once they are through being shown because I really like puppy cuts and how short I clip them depends on the dog. Some look cute with fluffy bodies and legs, others look cute with a shorter cut to the body and longer legs. My favorite cut is close cut body and longer legs. That close cut body means less grooming time for both of us, but keeping the legs and tail long also gives a sense of that long silky coat. When I have a girl about to deliver a litter I trim up the legs and back end, not to the skin but would not keep the leg hair really long. That long hair gets in the way of nursing puppies and during and for a period of time after delivery the mom has a lot of discharge. It's not pretty and it's not sanitary.

My avatar is a picture of Timmy in full coat the day he finished his championship. I gave him a haircut about 9 months later. Here's a picture of him sporting the casual look. He loves that he gets to run and play and have much more of a wash and wear lifestyle.

 

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Marsha,

My earlier post was a bit general. Whereas this thread is really seeking out breeders with retirees. However, I am new to the board so I may not know all the rules.

If this thread is redundant, please delete. Either way, I am very grateful and appreciative to the board for the endless feedback and the great resources.

:innocent:
You won't know if a breeder has any retirees until you look at their website or speak directly to them. Also not all AMA breeders are publicly listed on the AMA breeder list - the breeders listed are voluntary.

If you have any questions regarding a breeder, post them - someone will respond. Beware of the online "breeders". Many are just BYB'rs with a computer, and some are brokers for Puppy millers posing as breeders - usually having a multitude of breeds to offer. :angry:
 

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Have you thought about rescues? check out some animal she;ters. We had a mother and pup Maltese come in a couple years ago,they were adopted,just like that though.
 

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Just an FYI, most reputable show breeders prefer to place their retirees with someone who has has Maltese before. Many won't place a retiree in a home where she will be the only dog. Retirees are special needs dogs like rescues. As Marsha said, potty training regression and other behavioral issues are to be expected. Adult dogs, whether they are from a show breeder or a rescue group, have adjustment issues. Patience and experience are very important.
Wow, I just cannot figure out where this information comes from and hope and pray that people reading it do not assume that it's fact. I am not the exception to the rule and neither are my dogs. And personally I am offended that anyone would think that any of my dogs are special needs dogs. Whether they are dogs that I have adopted through rescue, dogs that I have purchased, or dogs that were born in my house, NONE of my dogs are special needs dogs ... dogs are like people in that every dog is different and every dog has different needs.

I don't have a lot of dogs, have only ever "retired" one dog, but I certainly can speak from experience in placing dogs given all the rescues I've placed over the past 10+ years. Every dog, whether 12 weeks, 12 months or 12 years old needs support and guidance in transitioning to a new home. There's nothing "special needs" about that. My one retiree from the moment of birth until shortly after her 4th birthday shared her life with one human and multiple dogs and would eliminate both on potty pads and on the grass outdoors. She now lives as an only dog with two humans, made the choice herself to eliminate only outdoors, and graciously accepted the opportunity to sleep on their bed at night. She still runs and plays and barks and wags her tail. Sometimes she chooses to spend time on the sofa with her humans and other times she chooses to spend time on the floor entertaining herself with her toys. What's so "special needs" about any of that? She is not "Wonderdog" and she is not the exception to the rule.
 

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Wow, I just cannot figure out where this information comes from and hope and pray that people reading it do not assume that it's fact. I am not the exception to the rule and neither are my dogs. And personally I am offended that anyone would think that any of my dogs are special needs dogs. Whether they are dogs that I have adopted through rescue, dogs that I have purchased, or dogs that were born in my house, NONE of my dogs are special needs dogs ... dogs are like people in that every dog is different and every dog has different needs.

I don't have a lot of dogs, have only ever "retired" one dog, but I certainly can speak from experience in placing dogs given all the rescues I've placed over the past 10+ years. Every dog, whether 12 weeks, 12 months or 12 years old needs support and guidance in transitioning to a new home. There's nothing "special needs" about that. My one retiree from the moment of birth until shortly after her 4th birthday shared her life with one human and multiple dogs and would eliminate both on potty pads and on the grass outdoors. She now lives as an only dog with two humans, made the choice herself to eliminate only outdoors, and graciously accepted the opportunity to sleep on their bed at night. She still runs and plays and barks and wags her tail. Sometimes she chooses to spend time on the sofa with her humans and other times she chooses to spend time on the floor entertaining herself with her toys. What's so "special needs" about any of that? She is not "Wonderdog" and she is not the exception to the rule.

GREAT POST MARY!

You know the accuracy about the retirees. People that aren’t directly involved with the business, should refrain from making incorrect statements.
 

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Great post Mary. I was reading many of the replies and was beginning to wonder what's fact and fiction. I'm just excited we are now at the point of bringing an a long awaited addition to the family.
 

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:thumbsup: I agree. You got great advice in your earlier thread:

http://spoiledmaltese.com/forum/56-breeders/109983-finally-kids-old-enough-massachusetts.html

Just an FYI, most reputable show breeders prefer to place their retirees with someone who has has Maltese before. Many won't place a retiree in a home where she will be the only dog. Retirees are special needs dogs like rescues. As Marsha said, potty training regression and other behavioral issues are to be expected. Adult dogs, whether they are from a show breeder or a rescue group, have adjustment issues. Patience and experience are very important.
"Special Needs" has a connotation that may misconstrued to mean that the dogs are somehow lacking. It might be best to say that all dogs have individual needs. Sometimes people assume getting an adult they will be free of all the individual needs a puppy requires, and that is true, but adult dogs (retirees and rescues) have their own unique needs. Each one is special. So whatever route you choose to take be prepared to devote time and attention to allowing your new baby to settle in.
 

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"Special Needs" has a connotation that may misconstrued to mean that the dogs are somehow lacking. It might be best to say that all dogs have individual needs. Sometimes people assume getting an adult they will be free of all the individual needs a puppy requires, and that is true, but adult dogs (retirees and rescues) have their own unique needs. Each one is special. So whatever route you choose to take be prepared to devote time and attention to allowing your new baby to settle in.

Great post, Carina! People often misunderstand terms or different people give different meanings to a term. I dislike the term "special needs" like I dislike the term "disabled", they both often have negative connotations. Yes, I also believe every dog, like every person, is different. And each will have strengths and weaknesses.
In response to the person/family who started this post, I think it is wonderful that you are going to add a furry member to your family. I would also encourage you to consider a rescue Maltese. I think it would be a wonderful thing to teach your children, that your family opened it's arms to a homeless dog. I have two rescued Maltese in my family, Lily, who came to the family at 6 months and Nadia, who came to our family at 6 years of age. My own personal experience was that Nadia was by far easier to transition into the family. She is loving and playful and just a joy. Both of my beautiful girls stop traffic when we go for walks and with so many homeless dogs in this world, I personally do not feel it is right to encourage breeding for the purpose of profit/selling. I volunteer for different dog rescues and would be happy to be of assistance if you have any questions. Good luck with your search.
 

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Wow, I just cannot figure out where this information comes from and hope and pray that people reading it do not assume that it's fact. I am not the exception to the rule and neither are my dogs. And personally I am offended that anyone would think that any of my dogs are special needs dogs. Whether they are dogs that I have adopted through rescue, dogs that I have purchased, or dogs that were born in my house, NONE of my dogs are special needs dogs ... dogs are like people in that every dog is different and every dog has different needs.

I don't have a lot of dogs, have only ever "retired" one dog, but I certainly can speak from experience in placing dogs given all the rescues I've placed over the past 10+ years. Every dog, whether 12 weeks, 12 months or 12 years old needs support and guidance in transitioning to a new home. There's nothing "special needs" about that. My one retiree from the moment of birth until shortly after her 4th birthday shared her life with one human and multiple dogs and would eliminate both on potty pads and on the grass outdoors. She now lives as an only dog with two humans, made the choice herself to eliminate only outdoors, and graciously accepted the opportunity to sleep on their bed at night. She still runs and plays and barks and wags her tail. Sometimes she chooses to spend time on the sofa with her humans and other times she chooses to spend time on the floor entertaining herself with her toys. What's so "special needs" about any of that? She is not "Wonderdog" and she is not the exception to the rule.
Mary, great first hand insight.

To me, the retirees, oh you bet they are special. To me they are like gold. The contributed so beautifully to the Maltese breed, that we all love so much. They just are blessings to the breed, in my opinion, and without them, and the loving ethical breeders, there would not be any Maltese. Can you imagane how a world without these precious ones.

Rescues: Are so special, in their very own precious way. And are in rescue through no fault of their own.

Special needs? No, not at all.

As Mary said, anytime you bring in a new addition to your home, whether it be a pup, retiree, rescue, there will always be a transition period. And it doesn't have to be a bad thing at all. Transition periods, are also special times, where the dogs owner, gives the new addition, love, guidance, encouragement, direction, and the beauty of it is, seeing the new addition, transitioning to all these wonderful things and becoming competely happy, adjusted, fur-baby and live the life of a pampered pet. The end result is a loving bond has formed, with a very happy well loved fur-baby.

The only thing that I can compare it to, is having Mia and Leo, so close in age. That trasitioning period, will forever be so special to me.

All it takes, is alot of love, which is the easy part, and knowledge, and yes time, but that time, is special and is all a part of the bonding period.

Again, without our precious retirees, that contribute so much to the Maltese world, to the breed, are more than deserving of this loving transitional period and the new owners who are so blessed to have them, are just that , blessed.
 

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Hi Allie,

I generally put my dogs in puppy cuts once they are through being shown because I really like puppy cuts and how short I clip them depends on the dog. Some look cute with fluffy bodies and legs, others look cute with a shorter cut to the body and longer legs. My favorite cut is close cut body and longer legs. That close cut body means less grooming time for both of us, but keeping the legs and tail long also gives a sense of that long silky coat. When I have a girl about to deliver a litter I trim up the legs and back end, not to the skin but would not keep the leg hair really long. That long hair gets in the way of nursing puppies and during and for a period of time after delivery the mom has a lot of discharge. It's not pretty and it's not sanitary.

My avatar is a picture of Timmy in full coat the day he finished his championship. I gave him a haircut about 9 months later. Here's a picture of him sporting the casual look. He loves that he gets to run and play and have much more of a wash and wear lifestyle.

Wow, what a beautiful coat, it's like silk -and a captivating face, to boot!

Timmy, you are indeed, a very handsome fellow.
 
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