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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I am new to this forum and am VERY,VERY happy to be here. My little girl is 18 weeks old. (Weighs about 2lbs. A "micro" teacup). She is a VERY BAD EATER..... 5 weeks ago, she had a SERIOUS hypogycemic attack and we rushed her to the amimal hospital... She was there for 3 day's. I'm VERY happy to say that she's doing much better now. The hospital taught me to syringe food into her and she takes it quite well.
She started to eat off a plate on her own (with the same vet soft food), but she again has become finicky! I also give her hard kibble, but NO LUCK! About 3 times a week I can get her to eat a small buiscuit.
After each meal, (now 3 times a day), I give her a bit of Karo syrup. As per my vet, I do not give Nutrical, because it will make her nauseas due to the food she's eating has ALLOT of nutrients.
Can anyone suggest how I can get her to eat NORMALLY?? Not by syringe...I will start to integrate slowly, some new soft foods and see... Any suggestions would be GREATLY appreciated!!! I ADORE MY LITTLE CHA CHA!!!!!!
Sincerely, Jellybn1
 

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I have no advice other than to develop a very good relationship with your Vet and follow their recommendations. These cross breeds come with a very long laundry list of health and structure problems. Good luck with your little one.
 

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how does she react with human food? try giving her plain chicken and rice....if she eats it---then you can have her on a homecooked diet. a few of us on here have our dogs on that---so you can find threads about specific books and meals.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have not tried any human food or others as of yet. I want to get her throgh 6 months. I will do it as she gets a bit older. I want her to eat doggy food, as it has all the nutrients, she needs now for proper developement I think....
 

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What is a cha cha?
 

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Originally posted by Sisses Momma@Mar 28 2005, 02:32 PM
tlunn, I think that is the name of her puppy.....
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=46876
[/QUOTE]


Originally posted by jellybn1@Mar 28 2005, 02:34 PM
My puppies name is Cha Cha!!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=46877
[/QUOTE]


Sorry-
Duh!


These cross breeds come with a very long laundry list of health and structure problems. Good luck with your little one.[/B]
I guess this is what confused me...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Originally posted by tlunn+Mar 28 2005, 03:14 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-Sisses Momma
@Mar 28 2005, 02:32 PM
tlunn, I think that is the name of her puppy.....
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=46876

Originally posted by jellybn1@Mar 28 2005, 02:34 PM
My puppies name is Cha Cha!!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=46877
[/QUOTE]


Sorry-
Duh!


These cross breeds come with a very long laundry list of health and structure problems. Good luck with your little one.[/B]
I guess this is what confused me...

<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=46890
[/B][/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm confused....???? This dog is a "purebreed". She has been bred quite small though! She has the SWEETEST personality, my little cutie pie!!!!
Jellybn1
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No offense taken... I do know this. I really just need some help on feeding... There are no "teacup" size dogs that are recognized too!
 

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How big are the pieces of dry food? Maybe they are too big for her to chew.

You could also try adding a little warm water to the food to soften it up a little.

You could try the boiled chicken that Dr. Cathy suggested. After a few days you can add a little dry food and then each day add more dry food and less chicken.

Some people have found adding a tablespoon of baby food or cottage cheese to the dry food gets their furbabies to eat.

I had to hand feed Lexi for the first couple of weeks. Now she likes me to dump her breakfast serving on the floor and she will eat it.
 

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Originally posted by Lexi's Mom@Mar 28 2005, 04:06 PM
I had to hand feed Lexi for the first couple of weeks.  Now she likes me to dump her breakfast serving on the floor and she will eat it.
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just dump it on the floor! too funny.

Phoebe loves for me to hand feed her. She also prefers me to be in the room while she is eating out of her bowl. If I see she wont eat, I will give her a few pieces by hand to "prime the pump" so to speak. Sometimes I cut them in half and use them for training (they are tiny to begin with). The diameter of a pea but of course, flat and not round. I would try moistening it with water first if you dont want to try chicken, and if all else fails, try to hand feed her kibble.

Good luck!
 

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One thing that got Sisse to eat her dry kibble was we got it wet with some warm beef or chicken broth. As she got use to it we slowly quit putting the broth on it. Now she eats the dry just fine. Lexi's Mom had a great idea as far as the baby food (meat) or cottage cheese goes. Sis will do just about anything for cottage cheese!!
 

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Could someone please post the things that you are not supposed to feed your dog? I don't feed Lexi table scrapes so I don't know off the top of my head. I know that some baby foods have them so you need to check before you buy.
 

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Maybe even try mixing in a little high quality canned food with her dry kibble...I give Brink a couple tablespoons of Chicken Soup FTPLS (canned) and a little bit of dry kibble in the mornings. At night he just gets dry....maybe mixing it together will help her eat it better.
 

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Alcoholic beverages Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Baby food Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.

Cat food Generally too high in protein and fats.

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.

Citrus oil extracts Can cause vomiting.

Fat trimmings Can cause pancreatitis.

Grapes and raisins Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys.

Hops Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Human vitamin supplements containing iron Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Large amounts of liver Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Marijuana Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Milk and other dairy products Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Moldy or spoiled food, garbage Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Mushrooms Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder) Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Persimmons Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Pits from peaches and plums Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Raw eggs Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

Raw fish Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

Salt If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."
Sugary foods Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps (in large amounts) Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Tobacco Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Yeast dough Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Wow!!! What kind of message is this????????Please advise! I DO NOT give Cha Cha ANY of these things to eat!!!
 

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The message about the foods not to give your Cha Cha was in reply to Lexi's Mom asking for the list of foods that were no-no's. We were discussing baby foods and some of them do contain onions and garlic. It's a nice list to have around because sometimes you forget and something may CONTAIN one of these foods.....I didn't mean that you were feeding these to your dog.
 
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