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Discussion Starter #1
There is a 7 year old female Maltese at the Ames Shelter. She is not housebroken and suffers from separation anxiety. Her name is Lindi and she will need some dental work. She comes from a puppy mill.

A coworker adopted her but had to return her after one night because when they left she would go nuts (howled constantly).

Can someone help me get into contact with a rescue group?

Ames, IA Animal Shelter

I have a neighbor that does rescue work and I'm going to mention it to her. She works independently so not sure if she can get her.
 

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Originally posted by Lexi's Mom@Jan 7 2005, 05:25 PM
There is a 7 year old female Maltese at the Ames Shelter.  She is not housebroken and suffers from separation anxiety.  Her name is Lindi and she will need some dental work. She comes from a puppy mill. 

A coworker adopted her but had to return her after one night because when they left she would go nuts (howled constantly).

Can someone help me get into contact with a rescue group?

Ames, IA Animal Shelter

I have a neighbor that does rescue work and I'm going to mention it to her.  She works independently so not sure if she can get her.
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Thanks for the info. I forwarded it to Mary Palmer head of Northcentral Maltese Rescue and copied George Bailey, the Eastern NCMR rep. who was so helpful in the Memphis situation several days ago.
 

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Update.....I heard the following from Mary Palmer at NorthCentral Maltese Rescue:
"The key to placing a mill dog is that there MUST be another dog in the home. After all the dog has always had other dogs around her and so that would give her great comfort. I have limited fosters, I think only one or two in Iowa I can try to find out if one would take her in. Can you give me more information about her? Age, Weight, is she spayed, any shots etc."

I replied with the info from the shelter web page. Hopefully, she can help further. What she says about only placing puppymill dogs in homes where there is another dog makes such total sense.
 

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KC, thanks for the help! Hopefully they will be able to get her. My coworker said she is a really sweet dog. But they live in an apartment and had neighbors complaining about the howling. I would adopt her but I also live in an apartment building so I would have the same problem.
 

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If Mary Palmer gets her into Northcentral Maltese Rescue, Lindi will have the opportunity to be rehabilitated and have a wonderful new life in a real home. Being in the midwest, Mary and her fosters have had lots of experience with mill dogs and know their special needs. Lindi will be kept in foster for as long as necessary to find the right person to help her get over the trauma of her past life, then Northcentral will provide ongoing support for any help that may be needed after her adoption.

Lindi will most likely be placed in a home where someone is home with her most of the time for her sense of security and, as Mary said, with another dog in the house.

I hope Mary can find a foster for her. Perhaps you or your friend could also make a little donation to the rescue group if Lindi is accepted. The vet bills with the mill dogs can be pretty steep. Dentals alone run into the hundreds usually.

Keep us posted, won't you?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by LadysMom@Jan 10 2005, 09:08 AM
If Mary Palmer gets her into Northcentral Maltese Rescue, Lindi will have the opportunity to be rehabilitated and have a wonderful new life in a real home. Being in the midwest, Mary and her fosters have had lots of experience with mill dogs and know their special needs. Lindi will be kept in foster for as long as necessary to find the right person to help her get over the trauma of her past life, then Northcentral will provide ongoing support for any help that may be needed after her adoption.

Lindi will most likely be placed in a home where someone is home with her most of the time for her sense of security and, as Mary said, with another dog in the house.

I hope Mary can find a foster for her. Perhaps you or your friend could also make a little donation to the rescue group if Lindi is accepted. The vet bills with the mill dogs can be pretty steep. Dentals alone run into the hundreds usually.

Keep us posted, won't you?
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I would be more than willing to make a donation. I'm just afraid that if she is adopted out throught the shelter she will get returned again. My coworker got her the day after she was brought to the shelter so she didn't even have time to adjust to it. The poor thing. I feel so bad for her. My coworker said that returning her was the hardest thing he has ever had to do.
 

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Originally posted by Lexi's Mom@Jan 12 2005, 04:25 PM
It looks like Lindi was adopted or rescued!  She is no longer on the website.
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She was adopted out before Northcentral Maltese Rescue could get to her. They spent a couple days looking for a foster home and had found one but she was gone when they got there. NCMR was concerned that she was adopted out to someone who perhaps is inexperienced with a rescue who has been in a puppymill. There is more to adopting a dog such as this than meets the eye. The nice thing about rescue organizations is that they make sure the dog goes to the right home; I imagine the shelter will sell her to anyone who has the money.
 

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Yeah I was hoping she went to a good home. I'll keep an eye on the website to see if she gets "returned" (god that sounds bad). I'm hoping that the person who adopted her will be able to work with her and that she is in a forever home.
 

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Kristi, maybe you could call the shelter and explain that she can get into rescue if she's returned again and asked to be contacted if she is? This poor soul is emotionally damaged enough from being a mill dog, but being passed from home to home at this stage in her life will just reinforce her fear and insecurity and make her less and less able to be rehabiltated and adopted.

Mill dogs need a very special foster situation to prepare them (and their adoptive family) for their forever home. As Mary Palmer said, they need another dog in the house for security and as a positive role model. They also need very limited exposure to strangers so a "come look at my new dog" situation would be a disaster.

Here is some information from the Puppy Mill Rescue group on what someone adopting a mill dog should expect:

Before you confirm your interest in adoption I would like to tell you a little bit about what it’s like to live with a puppy mill dog. I know we tend to want to save them all, but PLEASE, PLEASE DO NOT ACT ON THE SPUR OF THE MOMENT, "I want a doggie" syndrome. Think it though as this is a LIFETIME decision -- much the same has having children would be.

These dogs are not housebroken - they will pee in your house... please make sure your entire family is in 100% agreement with bringing another dog into your home - and that they all also understand the many problems that can occur.

If you have allergies, then a dog may not be the right choice for your household.They can be hard to potty train. Some are NEVER truly trained. It maybe very trying to deal with some of their issues, like poop eating, excessive fears, or an excessively needy dog.

They tend to be frightened of sudden moves, loud noises, and sometimes even the touch of a hand. Some dogs will never be a normal dog due the neglect and treatment they received in the mill. These dogs also tend to run or bolt if given any opportunity to do so and can be very hard to catch because they are afraid.

It takes time to build the trust that the mills stripped from the dogs during the time they were in the mill. They can go from being very scared to being totally dependent upon you, in such a short time.

They may attach themselves to one person in the home and become their protector and not want to allow anyone near that person.

They may not want to be separated from you. They can become very stressed if they are boarded. They remember their life in the mill and they feel as though they have been placed right back into that situation when they are boarded and put in a cage, groomer cages can be a problem too.

You have to be willing to take time out of your current lifestyle to help this poor unfortunate soul who depends solely on you.

These dogs have many needs and they have been through heck living in a small cage, not getting enough to eat, not knowing understanding, love, patience, or the gentle touch of a hand. Some have spent their entire lives living in a cage with their feet never touching the ground.

They do not know what the feel of grass is beneath their feet. They have never been walked on a leash so you will have to teach them just as if they were a puppy.

These dogs generally require ongoing vet expenses.

They tend to require dentals more frequently due to their years of neglect of dental care. They may require some, if not all, of their teeth to be removed if they are older. They may develop joint problems, after they are adopted, that were not known prior to adoptions because of their years of inactivity confined in cages.

It may take several months to get the puppy mill smell out of the dog. No matter how many times that you wash the dog, the smell may come back. This is embedded deep into the pores of the dogs and it will take time and good food and care in order to rid the dog of this smell.

These dogs do not really know how to act like a dog, this is something that they will learn over time with much patience and understanding, and the help of your other dog in the house.

Caring, patience, no preconceived notions of the perfect dog, or the perfect dog in a week or a month, dealing with the dog's issues, and being willing to wait till the dog is ready to be touched, pooping or peeing on the floor, hoarding toys or food, growling, or barking.

Some dogs may also be somewhat food aggressive. Any and all of this might be in your future with your new puppy mill dog. These dogs are not "perfect", but they can learn and they do deserve to be loved.

So if you are not up to a great challenge, then a puppy mill dog is not the dog for you. All this is very important to understand as we are trying to find the best home possible for these animals that have been treated so badly in their lives until they came into our care.
 
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