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After having recently lost my puppy to Parvo, I’m definitely wanting to do things right. I realize now that he was still too young to come home with me. He was 8 weeks. And the one mistake that cost him his life was that he didn’t have his shots yet. We were just going to start them when he got sick. I know now that this BYB should have given him the shots before selling him to us. The question I have now is, how do I have to wait to get another furbaby?? I’ve been hearing different things and am not sure what the norm is. The vet said 2 weeks, another site I read up on said 3 – 6 months! And so now, my husband doesn’t want to put another dog in danger of getting Parvo. Can someone tell me what they know about this awful disease? I’ve read a couple of articles, but would like some more personal feedback.

Thank you so much!
Yolanda
 

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I am not a vet and in no way qualified to dispense medical advice--I can only share my knowledge based on experience.

I used to live in a Parvo infested area with high occurance and, when I worked in rescue as a foster home for pregnant females and too young puppies, saw several litters of puppies die from this horrible virus. Parvo is highly, highly contagious and longlasting. The parvovirus can live in the ground for up to a year.

I have never heard of a vet saying two weeks before bringing a new pup to a parvo infested home. Our vets, who had a lot of parvo experience, recommended waiting 6 months to a year, and to disinfect every inch of the house and yard with bleach to kill as much as possible.

However, I do believe the vaccine can make a difference, but it is my understanding that the puppy has to have had the full sequence of parvo shots before he or she can be brought into the home. If you got a puppy, you'd have to wait until he or she is older and has had all shots before bringing her home. Since vaccines are never a sure thing, this is risky.
 

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i just saw an episode on Animal Cops San Francisco. and this lady had parvo in her backyard (like all her pets died except for one...that was an adult and she spent a couple thousand dollars to save him). well, the animal cop told her that she would need to bleach and water her whole backyard to kill the parvo.


call a few vets, just to make sure.
 

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Is waiting that long necessary even if the puppy wasn't around the house very long? He pretty much was in the playpen or in our arms. He did walk around the living & kitchen though. And he did go out into the back yard & the grass a little. Do I still have to bleach the grass? We washed everything with bleach that he touched or was near, the sofa covers, all our bedding, our clothes, we still have his playpen though. How do I bleach that? And how would I bleach the grass? Sorry for so many questions but I didn't know much about this before & the vet kinda laughed when I thought it should be 6 months before I got another pet. He's the one who said 2 weeks, the assstants all said 3-6 months. I sure appreciate your help!
 

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We too lost a puppy to parvo. We were told before we brought Ranger home we had to wait at least 6 months and bleach everything we couldn't throw away. That ment our yard, our house anywhere that the puppy had been. We threw away his crate, bedding, toys, bowls, leashes, and we even went as far as to throw away our slip covers on the furniture and just replace them. We then had to mix bleach and water ( don't remember the mix) put it in a bug sprayer for the yard and spray the entire yard once a week for 3 weeks. We also made sure Ranger was up to date on his shots when he came home. We put a Rocal (disinfectent the vet gave us) and water mix in our carpet shampooer and cleaned all the carpets once a week for 3 weeks.
 

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When you do find a breeder (after waiting the 6 months) I would mention that you had a puppy that died of parvo. See if they can keep the puppy until it has ALL of its shots, so until it is 16 weeks. That way you wouldn't have to worry as much. I think most good breeders would do this for you.

Oh, if you need help searching for a good reputable breeder in your area let us know.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Originally posted by LadysMom@May 18 2005, 01:35 PM
Here's some great information on Parvo. It recommends a 6 month waiting period before bringing a new puppy home as the virus can live that long.

http://www.workingdogs.com/parvofaq.htm
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[/QUOTE]

Thanks so much for that information!! Although it saddens me to have to wait until probably the new year, I'd rather wait than go through that again. It breaks my heart to know what they go through once they get infected. How horrible!! But for now, I'll live vicariously through your pics of your wonderful babies. I just love looking pics of your little ones.

Again, thanks so much for your help!
 

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This is a good article on properly vaccinating for Parvo:

Article on Parvo by Jeff Wayman, DVM.

JULY 26, 2000

Canine Parvo - Prevention is the Key

Since it first appeared on the veterinary radar screen in the late 1970's, canine parvovirus infection has claimed the lives of countless puppies. Over the last two decades, our understanding of this disease has improved greatly, yet beloved pets die of parvovirus infection every day. Why does this continue to occur, and where have we as a veterinary community (veterinarians and clients) failed our patients?

The blame for parvo's continued presence as a killer must be shared by veterinarians and dog owners alike. Only the patients are innocent in this scenario. Preventing parvovirus infection from ocurring is much preferable to treating cases as they happen. We all recognize this tenet as an illustration of the old saw "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure".

How do dogs become protected (immune if you will) from the ravages of parvo? There are two ways this can be achieved. One is by natural infection. Dogs that contract parvovirus and survive the disease acquire effective immunity against future re-infection. An effective means of acquiring immunity, but a tad Draconian for my tastes!

A much better choice of course is immunization of puppies against parvo. Here is where veterinarian and owner must become partners working towards a common goal of raising a healthy puppy. Let's look closely at vaccinating pups against parvo, and some of the pitfalls to avoid.

How does a vaccine protect an animal against disease? The immunology of the process is beyond our scope here, but understanding the basics will help us keep our dogs healthy. Although parvo vaccines are generally administered as a combination vaccine (with distemper and hepatitis), we will concentrate on parvo alone.

Most parvovirus vaccines are "modified-live virus vaccines". That means that the parvo virus they contain is alive, but has been rendered incapable of causing clinical disease. The purpose of giving a vaccine is to stimulate the pup's immune system to produce antibodies against the virus. These antibodies persist in the dog's body, providing immunity to the disease.

The initial vaccination given to a young puppy DOES NOT provide complete immunity against infection. This is such a critical point. I can't tell you how many times an owner has presented an 8 week old puppy and told me "the guy I got Fido from said he has had ALL his shots". Impossible.

It is the booster injections that stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies. The first vaccine serves mainly to "prime" the immune system and prepare it for subsequent boosters.

Another point of confusion among many breeders and owners alike is when to begin vaccinating puppies. I see many pups that have been vaccinated several times by the age of 8 weeks. Ok, great right? The puppy has already had a series of boosters, and should be protected against parvo. Wrongo!

Puppies receive antibodies against parvo and other diseases from their mother before and shortly after birth. These maternal antibodies provide some protection during the first 8 to 12 weeks of life before disappearing from the puppy's body. The other thing they do is interfere with a vaccine's ability to stimulate the immune system. Any vaccine virus particles given during the first few weeks of life get "snapped up" by the maternal antibodies before having a chance to have much benefit to the puppy.

Now, vaccinating puppies against parvo at 3 or 4 weeks of life may not hurt the animal, but you might as well toss the vaccine down the drain for all the good it is doing. Every veterinarian has his/her own vaccine schedule, but most are fairly similar. I recommend vaccinating puppies at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. In high parvo risk breeds such as Rottweilers and Dobermans, we will usually give another booster at 20 weeks of age.

The exact timing of the vaccine injections may vary, what is important is that the puppy receive the complete series. Veterinarians must do a better job educating dog owners about how vaccines work, and why the boosters are critical if we are ever to eradicate parvo from our dogs' lives.

One final thought on this subject. I know that many of you give your own vaccinations. It is not a technically difficult task, and I really don't have a problem with owners giving vaccinations. However, when you do so, you are depriving your dog of a thorough physical examination by his doctor. If your veterinarian doesn't perform such an exam with every vaccination, maybe you should ask yourself if this is the doctor for your dog.

In addition, vaccines are delicate substances, and must be handled and stored with care to maintain potency. This fact is sometimes lost on feed stores and other outlets that sell vaccines over the counter.

Canine parvo infection is a dreadful disease, made more so by the fact that it is entirely preventable! Team up with your family veterinarian to make sure your dog does not become another victim of parvo. If you have questions on this or any other topic related to Pet Health, please visit our message forums and post your question there!
 

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Also just because a puppy is vaccinated does not mean he can not get it. Please do not make that mistake. Our lab who caught it at 10 wks and died was up to date on all his shots. And they had been given by our vet.
 

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Originally posted by ahappystamper+May 18 2005, 10:07 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-LadysMom
@May 18 2005, 01:35 PM
Here's some great information on Parvo. It recommends a 6 month waiting period before bringing a new puppy home as the virus can live that long.

http://www.workingdogs.com/parvofaq.htm
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63125
Thanks so much for that information!! Although it saddens me to have to wait until probably the new year, I'd rather wait than go through that again. It breaks my heart to know what they go through once they get infected. How horrible!! But for now, I'll live vicariously through your pics of your wonderful babies. I just love looking pics of your little ones.

Again, thanks so much for your help!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63179
[/B][/QUOTE]
Just to let you know good breeders don't have puppies all the time so you would have to wait anyway. I've been searching since the end of Feb for a 2nd puppy. I have just recently found 3 breeders that are expecting puppies at the end of May. I will then have to wait 12 weeks. So if everything works it will be 6 months from when I started my search until I get the puppy.

I have a bunch of info on what to look for in a breeder and questions to ask. If you want me to PM it to you let me know.
 

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Originally posted by dhodina@May 18 2005, 10:13 AM
Also just because a puppy is vaccinated does not mean he can not get it.  Please do not make that mistake.    Our lab who caught it at 10 wks and died was up to date on all his shots.  And they had been given by our vet.
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[/QUOTE]

If you read the article I posted, you'll see why this vet feels that the best schedule is to vaccinate puppies for Parvo at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. He says starting at 3 or 4 weeks won't hurt them, but doesn't properly protect them from Parvo.

When you say that your lab puppy was up to date on his shots at 10 weeks, do you mean he was finished with the Parvo series? That might explain why he still got Parvo according to this vet.
 

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I have a question about Parvo vaccinations. I got got a reminder card from my old vet on what shots Lexi needed to get. One of them was a parvo shot. She is 16 months old. Did she need to get a booster shot for Parvo? I took the card with us to the vet I use now and when they gave her the shots she only got the DHP and rabies. Was she supposed to get a Parvo too?
 

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Originally posted by LadysMom+May 18 2005, 11:20 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-dhodina
@May 18 2005, 10:13 AM
Also just because a puppy is vaccinated does not mean he can not get it.  Please do not make that mistake.    Our lab who caught it at 10 wks and died was up to date on all his shots.  And they had been given by our vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63183
If you read the article I posted, you'll see why this vet feels that the best schedule is to vaccinate puppies for Parvo at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. He says starting at 3 or 4 weeks won't hurt them, but doesn't properly protect them from Parvo.

When you say that your lab puppy was up to date on his shots at 10 weeks, do you mean he was finished with the Parvo series? That might explain why he still got Parvo according to this vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63186
[/B][/QUOTE]

I don't know about that situation, but my Irish Setter got it just about 5 months and she was fully vaccinated starting at 8 weeks. She lived, thank the Lord, but it was a VERY EXPENSIVE vet visit and a very hard time for me. The vet told me that she had a very slim chance of living when I brought her in, I told him to do what ever what needed. He was willing to work out some sort of payment arrangement with me (he is still my vet today along with his wife). He told me that IF she survived the night there was still a chance she wouldnt make it, but she had better odds. The next day (and $3,000 later) I took her home and she lived. I had to throw everything out that she had been in contact with- and do the bleach thing ...problem is that the neighbors dogs had gotten it and they just let them roam the neighborhood and they came into my yard. I heard later that 4 other dogs in our neighborhood had died because of it. I moved right after that just because I felt the whole neighborhood wasnt safe for Jasper. It's a really scary experience!!

-c
 

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Anyway, this is interesting. It says that tha natural immunities that a puppy receives from its mother prevent it from developing antibodies from the vaccine and may actually neutralize the vaccine so that is why puppies under 6 months are more susceptibile to Parvo.

Immunity via vaccination is your dog’s best defense against parvo. Have your dog vaccinated with a vaccine made from modified live virus - a biologically altered and harmless version of CPV- 2. Immunizing puppies presents special challenges. Although puppies born to immunized mothers are protected for a period of time, during the first 4 to 12 weeks of a pup’s life, maternal antibodies decline to a level where they no longer protect the puppy. But pups can’t produce antibodies in response to to vaccines until maternal antibodies drop below protective levels. This creates a window of susceptibility during which maternal-antibody levels are high enough to neutralize the vaccine but too low to protect against infection. Recent improvements in parvo vaccines, however, have helped close the window of susceptibility. Veterinarians usually administer these now parvo vaccines to pups as a three-shop series - typically beginning at 6 to 8 weeks of age. Compared to the traditional four- or five-shot regimen, this schedule is more convenient for owners and allows veterinarians to protect pups at a younger age.

But no vaccine can guarantee 100-percent protection. So owners must be vigilant about their puppy’s comings and goings. Keep your pup away from other dogs with uncertain vaccination status - and from areas where such dogs congregate. Before, enrolling your in puppy kindergarten
 

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Originally posted by LadysMom@May 18 2005, 12:01 PM
Anyway, this is interesting. It says that tha natural immunities that a puppy receives from its mother prevent it from developing antibodies from the vaccine and may actually neutralize the vaccine so that is why puppies under 6 months are more susceptibile to Parvo.

Immunity via vaccination is your dog’s best defense against parvo. Have your dog vaccinated with a vaccine made from modified live virus - a biologically altered and harmless version of CPV- 2. Immunizing puppies presents special challenges. Although puppies born to immunized mothers are protected for a period of time, during the first 4 to 12 weeks of a pup’s life, maternal antibodies decline to a level where they no longer protect the puppy. But pups can’t produce antibodies in response to to vaccines until maternal antibodies drop below protective levels. This creates a window of susceptibility during which maternal-antibody levels are high enough to neutralize the vaccine but too low to protect against infection. Recent improvements in parvo vaccines, however, have helped close the window of susceptibility. Veterinarians usually administer these now parvo vaccines to pups as a three-shop series - typically beginning at 6 to 8 weeks of age. Compared to the traditional four- or five-shot regimen, this schedule is more convenient for owners and allows veterinarians to protect pups at a younger age.

But no vaccine can guarantee 100-percent protection. So owners must be vigilant about their puppy’s comings and goings. Keep your pup away from other dogs with uncertain vaccination status - and from areas where such dogs congregate. Before, enrolling your in puppy kindergarten

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[/QUOTE]

Wow...thats really interesting. Jasper is almost 8 now...and I wish I knew then what I know now. I don't know if they used the modified live virus..and of course NOW they have improved the vaccine.

Thanks for the info!!

-c
 

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Also just because a puppy is vaccinated does not mean he can not get it.  Please do not make that mistake.    Our lab who caught it at 10 wks and died was up to date on all his shots.  And they had been given by our vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63183
If you read the article I posted, you'll see why this vet feels that the best schedule is to vaccinate puppies for Parvo at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. He says starting at 3 or 4 weeks won't hurt them, but doesn't properly protect them from Parvo.

When you say that your lab puppy was up to date on his shots at 10 weeks, do you mean he was finished with the Parvo series? That might explain why he still got Parvo according to this vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63186
[/quot


I am sorry if I was misunderstood. My point is that as you stated it protects them from parvo. It lessens the severity if caught and decreases chances of catching it. But it does not make them immune. No he wasn't done w/ the series @ 10wk's he was on his third vaccine. He had one at 3 wks, 6wks and 10 wks. His next wad due @ 14 wks w/ his rabies. The only problem w/ quoting article's is they are only one vet or writers opinion. I think sometimes we tend to take things as law because it is a published article. We have to remember it is just one Dr.'s expierence and as we all know different vets have different recommendations.
 

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Originally posted by Carrie+May 18 2005, 10:50 AM-->
Originally posted by [email protected] 18 2005, 11:20 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-dhodina
@May 18 2005, 10:13 AM
Also just because a puppy is vaccinated does not mean he can not get it.  Please do not make that mistake.    Our lab who caught it at 10 wks and died was up to date on all his shots.  And they had been given by our vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63183


If you read the article I posted, you'll see why this vet feels that the best schedule is to vaccinate puppies for Parvo at 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. He says starting at 3 or 4 weeks won't hurt them, but doesn't properly protect them from Parvo.

When you say that your lab puppy was up to date on his shots at 10 weeks, do you mean he was finished with the Parvo series? That might explain why he still got Parvo according to this vet.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63186

[/QUOTE]

I don't know about that situation, but my Irish Setter got it just about 5 months and she was fully vaccinated starting at 8 weeks. She lived, thank the Lord, but it was a VERY EXPENSIVE vet visit and a very hard time for me. The vet told me that she had a very slim chance of living when I brought her in, I told him to do what ever what needed. He was willing to work out some sort of payment arrangement with me (he is still my vet today along with his wife). He told me that IF she survived the night there was still a chance she wouldnt make it, but she had better odds. The next day (and $3,000 later) I took her home and she lived. I had to throw everything out that she had been in contact with- and do the bleach thing ...problem is that the neighbors dogs had gotten it and they just let them roam the neighborhood and they came into my yard. I heard later that 4 other dogs in our neighborhood had died because of it. I moved right after that just because I felt the whole neighborhood wasnt safe for Jasper. It's a really scary experience!!

-c
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=63192
[/B][/QUOTE]


I am so happy she made it. Thanks for showing what I have been trying to say.
 

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If I were you, my first step would be to get a different Vet. I question this ones responses to your questions.....2 weeks is unheard of to bring a new animal into a home with Parvo. We had a parvo pup years and years ago, she lived, but I would not put another pet in a situation that would cause them to get this disease, it's horrid......Marj's articles are great, do your homework!! Bleach, bleach, bleach, you can't do it enough.....I went as far as getting rid of all our furniture in the living room as that is where our pup was at. We tore up the carpeting and threw out the drapes....the whole 9 yards.....take the time you need to rid your home and yard of this disease.
 
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