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Koa no longer seems to enjoy walking. We used to take him for walks once or twice per day, and then out of no where he refuses to walk. He gets excited at the prospect of going outside, but as soon as we start walking down the street, he just lies down and refuses to move. Sometimes I can "convince" him to walk a little ways, but usually I just have to carry him back to the front door.

It is so weird. He doesn't act scared or anything. He just lies down and looks up at me expectedly. If I try to give him a tug, he pulls back.

Anyone else have a problem like this? Once finals are over next week, I'm going to try to spend several hours outside under the park trees. Maybe he needs more outdoor socialization?

He is not lethargic, or acting sick. He still runs around the house like a maniac. :)
 

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I thinks someone else had this problem with their dog. I think it was something (experience, sight, sound, smell, etc.) scared the dog in the past. Try changing the route you take him on when you walk. Also try lots of encouragement.
 

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What a bum!!


I don't know, but that doesn't sound like fear to me, sounds like the stubborn bum wants you to pick him up...he is being the boss. I would drag his bum butt!!

You could tell when they are scared. I think he is enjoying making you pick him up. I read one trainer said to drag their little bottoms till they walk with you.

Max is starting to display more stubborness, himself. Very trying.
 

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My first Maltese missy used to do that... but then I noticed she would stop at any cracks in the pavement. Would not even go near any man holes, I mean the ones that have the solid covers. Yes she would just plump down and not move. What I did was walk her around it or pick her up until we got to a solid spot... she also would not walk in our out of the elevator. Other thing is do you live in a carpet environment. If that is the case the floor may feel different on his feet at well. My first Maltese missy also would not walk on hard wood floor because she was so used to the carpet flooring. Oh and yep it just started out of the blue.. Like yesterday she was fine and the next day she would not walk over any cracks. I would suggest you pick him up and walk with him to the park in your arms and then when you get there see what he does when you put him down again. If he walk at the park then it something the area near your home he does not like. Then you have to figure out what that is and start training sessions with treats to get him to walk over it. That’s what I had to do with missy. She never did get over the hardwood flooring.
 

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Chelsey has some good points. Your baby sounds frightened. They have a memory like a steel trap. If something happens to frighten them it takes a lot to overcome it. Saying they are "sensitive" doesn't even cover it. There is also a possibility that something could be wrong with her eyesight. She's OK in the house because she knows the house and doesn't need to see well to be comfortable. In the bright light and strangeness outside she might be afraid to move. Might ask the vet about this strange behavior.

Of course don't discount that she's a spoiled baby (isn't that why we have them?) and just wants to be picked up! But don't "drag her butt", be patient and give her a pleasant reason, like a reward, to move if that is what is wrong.
 

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While we don't want the to be "scared" we also do not want them training us and we don't want them to be fearful, either. If my dog is scared, I would know the difference. We have worked through a few fear issues together, like walking onto an elevator which can be scary, now he breezes through it....yes, I used a little tug in the beginning, picking him up would have just encouraged the fear. He is a pro on the elevator, now.

Same issue with cars zooming by (NY, you know) , if he had his way, he would have had me constantly pick him up...I don't want him to be afraid so we kept being exposed walking while cars zoomed by in the street and now he is again not phased by this, either.

Coddling them when they are scared does not do them any good, unless you want a "chicken malti" for a pet. Max hardly flinches at any noise now...and we are hoping to continue on that path. Next new thing that startles him, I will not reward by saying "awwe poor baby" (in my head, yes but not to hiim) to him I will say, come on let's go it's nothing...and he will respond that way...believe me, I know.

Now, if she says Koa does not appear scared, I am sure she knows her own dog by now, right?

Read this, it should help. I don't make this stuff up:

http://www.abcantra.com/control_walk.html
 

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I do not know what area of the country you are from, if the sidewalks are cold or frozen your baby might be experiencing some pain. Their pads should be protected from extremes whether hot or cold. Also another thought, have you had his patellas checked? A problem with the knees could be the reason he does not want to walk on concrete surfaces. If he is running around inside the house and playing he is probably getting enough excercise so that daily walking is not necessary. You could just take him out to potty then bring him back in. These little guys are so small that they do not require an extreme amount of exercise to stay in shape.
 

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I don't know, but that doesn't sound like fear to me, sounds like the stubborn bum wants you to pick him up...he is being the boss. I would drag his bum butt!![/B]
Whoa.... that sounds kind of harsh, doesn't it. Can I assume you were saying this in jest?

Koa, when I took Kallie to dog training they had said never to pull them on the lead but rather to get them to come naturally by having a treat in our hand and keeping it in front of the dog's nose as he starts to walk. Then as he is walking and we are moving him forward with the treat, we praise them to high heaven and then give them the treat. And then keep doing this over and over until they get the idea. We were to use the "heel" command as well.

Can you try walking him in the house and see if he will walk in that situation? Maybe then you can determine if it is something outside or another reason why he won't walk.

My first Maltese, Rosebud, used to stop walking in the middle of the street soon after we started our walks. When I told the vet about it he laughed and said that she was being lazy, etc. (I don't go to that vet any more.) It turned out that she had hypothyroidism which can cause lethargy. Rosebud also was active in the house so it was a surprise to me that she had the thyroid problem. I have to say that once she started on thyroid medicine, she never sat down in the middle of the street again.

Good luck and keep us posted!
 

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My husband was having the same problem with Miko and what he figured out was that Miko enjoys the walks at the nearby park/hiking trails a LOT more!! He does not want to go around the block but if my husband drives him over (its only a few blocks down) to the little park area, he gets all wild and excited and even cries to go outside!!!!!!!!!! He runs around ahead of us and we never need to pull to make him move there (unlike around the block). So, maybe he just doesn't like the area you are walking him at?? I disagree about them not needing exercise. Although maybe calorie wise they don't need a ton of exercise, I think its great for their mental stimulation!! Although we think of them as our babies, they are still dogs and benefit from going outside.
 

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Ofcourse the wording was in jest. I have read enough training tips that say this is a very common stubborn issue. And yes, you try getting him to come with treats but if that doesn't work, tugging on the lead is a must...unless you want him training you.

My dog Max happens to act rugged, not very fragile....so, if he just dropped on the ground without moving....I would know he was being stubborn. I can tell when he is scared...obviously, you would handle that situation differently, you don't want to traumatize him. I knew he was scared when a parked bus started it's engines in front of us...he got scared and froze...I ofcourse scoooped him up quickly and he started wagging his tail, again. The noise was loud and the fear was obvious but I still wasn't wishy washy with hiim....and he was fine.

p.s. -- when Max was getting used to walking in and out of the elevator, he was initially scared and would sit between my legs...'cowering'. We just kept going, and he got over it.

This part pertains to stubborn dogs: (they insist you be firm)
Let us start with the dragger. This dog refuses to walk, fights/bites at the lead, or insists on lying on the ground. First, try coaxing the dog into walking toward you while he is wearing the lead. Talk to him and encourage him to move in your direction. If he gets up and starts to come to you, do not get all excited. Just keep happy tones and allow him to move toward you, and when he is within 2 feet of you, start walking backwards. This will have the dog trying to reach you, and you will be moving away slowly. Once the dog is reassured that no harm is going to come to him, you may begin walking him in the proper manner. If a dog refuses to move at all, even after being reassured by the above exercise, you will have to use a more forceful approach, otherwise the dog will be training you. This is not what you want, so you will have to show your leadership.

Begin by walking in a straight line with the dog dragging behind. Do not walk and stop to look back, but just begin walking with conviction. This sounds like a horrible thing, but the greater majority of dogs will not allow you to drag them more than five (5) feet before getting to their feet and standing up. This can be compared to the child that decides it is not going to walk. They will throw themselves to the ground and refuse to move. Usually, the parent will take one hand and drag them, causing them to stand, or they will pick them up and carry them. You will not be carrying your dog around, so the only answer is to demonstrate your conviction and begin walking. Once standing, they will walk with some reluctance, but they will be walking. Do not jerk the lead, especially if this is a puppy less than six months of age. You must remember that there is no talking to the dog at this point. He would not walk when you were talking in pleasing tones, so now there will be no talking. This may sound cruel, but you are showing the dog that you have assumed control. When your dog realizes that he is losing this battle, he will give up and begin walking. There may be some lagging (staying behind you) at first, but eventually he will walk at your side. He has to gain confidence that all is well, even though he is being guided around. Once the confidence is there, he will walk willingly with you. You are teaching him that you have assumed control of the leader position and that you must be obeyed.

Do not talk to the dog, do not give any commands, and do not wait on the dog. Once you begin, pick out an object at a distance of approximately 50 feet, and walk straight for it. Do not talk, hesitate, or stop until you get there. When you reach your destination, turn to the right, choose another object, and walk straight to it. You must walk rapidly and with conviction. You are not out for a stroll, but are training your dog. Step out with lively steps and at a speed that would be the midpoint between walking and jogging. This will have you walking at a speed just above your normal walk. If the dog thinks you are going to hesitate or wait on him, you will have trouble getting him to obey you. He must perceive you as the leader; therefore, you must walk with conviction and confidence. This exercise should not last any longer than five (5) minutes. If your dog is still fighting the lead, or is refusing to walk willingly, do not console him. Take him to get some water, and release him from the exercise. Do not try to accomplish too much in one session, and don't chastise the dog for not complying its first time at this. It is new to him and he is reluctant to give up control to you. When released from this exercise, spend some time playing with your dog. He is confused by the event that just took place and will be unsure of your actions. Give him a chance to settle down and regain his confidence. This is similar to the manner instructions were handed out in the litter. He was removed from the litter, allowed to do whatever he wanted within the limits of his boundaries, and now you are telling him that he no longer has that option. Be patient, it will happen.

The dog that tries to get between your feet and cower is a very submissive dog. Do
 
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