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Anybody know if dogs are less likely to urinate on smooth surfaces? My Sugarplum is a 5 year old puppy mill rescue who was caged pretty much all her life, and she isn’t housebroken. Right now I am trying to pad train her. Usually a dog has to go within an hour after eating and/or drinking, and also I’ve learned to read her signals. (Catching her is a whole different story though). Anyhow, when I’m lucky to catch her and put her in her indoor pen, sometimes she does and sometimes she doesn’t always do it on the pad. My flooring is carpet, and it would take four pads to cover the entire surface area of the pen. I also want her to learn to tell the difference between the pad and the carpet, and to use the pad. So this is what I’m thinking: should I maybe put a plastic sheet on the entire surface area of the pen, and put the pad in one corner? I’ve heard that dogs are less likely to urinate on a smooth surface, and it would also protect my carpet in the event the pad slips or if the dog still didn’t use it. Thoughts?
 

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First, thank you for rescuing this baby!


My girls use pads because I don't have a yard - I'm in multi-family housing. They do sometimes have an accident on carpet because the texture (I'm guessing) feels like a pad. I also have no area rugs for this reason.


I use cloth liners with waterproof backing underneath the actual pad - these are the kinds of bed liners you see in nursing homes. They protect the floor.


Final thought - because of her background, housetraining may be very difficult and she may have a lot of accidents, regardless of whether you pad train or outdoors train. She's used to going wherever and whenever she wants. She will need tons of love and patience to get through this!
 

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Yes Maggie, I realize this will be no easy task. But I’ve read that housebreaking or pad training a puppy mill dog isn’t much different than that of a puppy...it just usually takes longer because the puppy mill dog has done it the way they have for so long, and going wherever and whenever they want is the only way they’ve ever known it.
On a positive note, aside from the pad training issue, she is getting better every day with trusting me. Just a short while ago, I slowly and gently approached her, and she just kept her eyes on me, not looking scared at all, and she let me pet her starting with the top of her head. She has never liked her head or face touched, so every time I have attempted to pet her, I would always start with her back.
 

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Yes Maggie, I realize this will be no easy task. But I’ve read that housebreaking or pad training a puppy mill dog isn’t much different than that of a puppy...it just usually takes longer because the puppy mill dog has done it the way they have for so long, and going wherever and whenever they want is the only way they’ve ever known it.
On a positive note, aside from the pad training issue, she is getting better every day with trusting me. Just a short while ago, I slowly and gently approached her, and she just kept her eyes on me, not looking scared at all, and she let me pet her starting with the top of her head. She has never liked her head or face touched, so every time I have attempted to pet her, I would always start with her back.
I have a good friend who adopted a puppy mill mom from a rescue. It took about three years before Molly was consistent enough to be considered housebroken. So yes, it takes a lot longer - sometimes years, not months.
 
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