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Hi i was wondering if anyone here got their dog from Puppy Petite (also know as Puppy Boutique) and if they seem to have health problems. When i got Obi from there i wasn't educated enough and i was just too excited, now that its done, i wanted to know if even though he is healthy right now, is there a chance he could turn up having problems? and did anyone else get there dog from here? I know they also sell other small breeds. Thanks

~Danielle and Obi
 

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Truthfully, it doesn't matter how well bred a dog is, they are still susceptible to health problems. All you can do is watch out for signs, and love him!
 

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I unfortunately got my Teddy from there. Denise and Chico also got one of her little ones from them.

I was lied to and told they breed the puppies in home...I found them not on the internet but in the paper. They said that they were home raised and that they only did a couple litters a year...I spoke to them about 6 times before I went and was horrified when I pulled up and saw a store front.

I have since done research with a site that I got from LadyMom and found that Teddy was breed in MN at a place that had 69 breeding femals.....I still get sick to my stomach when I think about it. Teddy has allergies to both chicken and beef which I discovered right away...he also has problems with the vacinations. He is however at this moment in time...healthy. He is 16 months old. He is very smart - potty trained immediately to the puppy pads....learns tricks so quickly that I have to really think to come up with new ones.

Are you having problems with your little one.
 

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Also, (sorry at work and a busy day) Teddy is between 6.5 and 7lbs, so white that we get complimented almost everyday when we walk...great hair although he did have a spot when I got him that was thin...perfect personality which matches the Malts that I have heard are breed to standard.
 

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Originally posted by Carrie@Oct 6 2005, 08:48 PM
Truthfully, it doesn't matter how well bred a dog is, they are still susceptible to health problems.  All you can do is watch out for signs, and love him! 

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[/QUOTE]
While all dogs can contract diseases, those that are not well bred may also have genetic predispositions to certain diseases and conditions which can compromise their health. A breeder who knows what they are doing can reduce those risks substantially. A puppy mill is more interested in breeding dogs for profit, without regard to the future health of the animal. Lady's Mom has posted some wonderful articles on this very subject. I realize that this is a personal choice and I certainly don't intend to offend anyone...to me I would rather not take that risk.
 

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Originally posted by saltymalty+Oct 7 2005, 10:00 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-Carrie
@Oct 6 2005, 08:48 PM
Truthfully, it doesn't matter how well bred a dog is, they are still susceptible to health problems.  All you can do is watch out for signs, and love him!  

<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107306
While all dogs can contract diseases, those that are not well bred may also have genetic predispositions to certain diseases and conditions which can compromise their health. A breeder who knows what they are doing can reduce those risks substantially. A puppy mill is more interested in breeding dogs for profit, without regard to the future health of the animal. Lady's Mom has posted some wonderful articles on this very subject. I realize that this is a personal choice and I certainly don't intend to offend anyone...to me I would rather not take that risk.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107438
[/B][/QUOTE]

Umm...well, she ALREADY has her fluff-butt...she said she wasn't educated at the time of the purchase (implying she is now) and I was being NICE to her....
 

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I just want to let everyone know that this place, puppy boutique, is very good at story telling....I was told all the right answers to questions. I did not want to support a puppymill. And yet, I got sucked into there place of business. There are many of us on here that have learned more and will do things different in than we have in the past. There are unscrupulous people in the world who know the right answers to say when some unsuspecting person comes along. I was one of them....but I won't be again.



Have I been further educated on this forum...you bettcha!!! I know because my Teddy came from a puppymill that I watch him every single day and worry about what time bombs may be ticking. It quite frankly scares me to death...as you all know Teddy is my baby boy and I don't even want to think about him having problems. But, I have to change the way I care for him because I now know that he is from a puppy mill. If a problem comes up I take him to the Vet immediately because I know he may be having a genetic problem.

In the meantime though, I have a beautiful little furbaby who is my world and it sounds like you also have a beautiful baby...love him with all your heart and just watch for any signs of ill health. And God forbid my Teddy dies before me....I know I will not make the same mistakes again.
 

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Originally posted by Carrie+Oct 7 2005, 10:04 AM-->
Originally posted by [email protected] 7 2005, 10:00 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-Carrie
@Oct 6 2005, 08:48 PM
Truthfully, it doesn't matter how well bred a dog is, they are still susceptible to health problems.  All you can do is watch out for signs, and love him!  

<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107306

While all dogs can contract diseases, those that are not well bred may also have genetic predispositions to certain diseases and conditions which can compromise their health. A breeder who knows what they are doing can reduce those risks substantially. A puppy mill is more interested in breeding dogs for profit, without regard to the future health of the animal. Lady's Mom has posted some wonderful articles on this very subject. I realize that this is a personal choice and I certainly don't intend to offend anyone...to me I would rather not take that risk.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107438

[/QUOTE]

Umm...well, she ALREADY has her fluff-butt...she said she wasn't educated at the time of the purchase (implying she is now) and I was being NICE to her....
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107439
[/B][/QUOTE]
So sorry, I didn't mean to cause a problem here. I was just stating my opinion. I wasn't trying to cast judgment on anyone. I apologize if it sounded that way.
 

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You know, we can only do so much to stop the puppy mills, and it probably will never stop. So, in the mean time, it makes me feel better knowing that these puppy mills puppies have loving and caring mothers like ya'll.
 

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Originally posted by MeandMyMalt@Oct 6 2005, 07:25 PM
Hi i was wondering if anyone here got their dog from Puppy Petite (also know as Puppy Boutique) and if they seem to have health problems. When i got Obi from there i wasn't educated enough and i was just too excited, now that its done, i wanted to know if even though he is healthy right now, is there a chance he could turn up having problems? and did anyone else get there dog from here? I know they also sell other small breeds. Thanks

~Danielle and Obi
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[/QUOTE]

As Obi's Mom says, she wasn't educated enough when she got him and too excited. The only way we can educate people about not buying from a pet store/puppy mill is to take every opportunity offered to get the word out, as Saltymalty did. Don't foget that although Obi's sale is a done deal, new people come to SM everyday to learn about Maltese before they buy. Those are the people we must reach.

To answer your question, Danielle, I will share Lady's story. I adopted her at age 4&1/2 when her first owner abandoned her. My neighbor who rescued her had known Lady all her life so I know her background. Lady came from a pet store. She was healthy for the first 4&1/2 years of her life. Then she began having seizures which is why her first mom tied her to a tree and left her behind when she moved. Primary epilepsy is thought to be genetic.

At her first vet visit the next day, my vet picked up a very slight heart murmur. Apparently quite often heart murmurs aren't detected until abiout age 5. Again, this is probably inherited.

1&1/2 years later, Lady was diagnosed with diabetes. She was overweight at the time, but, like with humans, she most likely inherited her tendency for the disease from her parents. She is insulin dependant (Type 1) as all dogs are.

Exactly a year later she had complications from her diabetes and nearly died. My vet's saved her and let me pay back her huge bill on a payment plan for a year.

Two months later she started having cluster seizures (seizures every 4-6 hours) which are very dangerous. She had a bad spell that lasted over 24 hours and she was unable to walk or see. She looked like a defective wind up toy, stumbling and bumping into walls. Thank heavens there was no permanent brain damage and she recovered 100%. But the seizure episodes last longer now.

Two months after that she started with severe allergies and the canine version of rheumatoid arthritis about the same time. She was unable to walk without a sling and her lymph glands were so swollen my vet thought she might have cancer so they were biopsied.

Thanks to steriods and Zyrtec, she got over those hurdles, too. Both allergies and arthritis are related to her weakened immune system.

And because of her poor immune system, she now gets chronic infections - uti's, vaginal and eye infections that never really clear up.

She is now 10. A living miracle. My vet cannot believe how well she is doing! Her vision is still perfect (most diabetic dogs go blind). She has to stay on prednisone for her arthritis, but it keeps her mobile and pain free most of the time. Her seizures are further apart now, maybe once a year, but have become worse as her cluster seizure episodes last for days at a time now. Her heart murmur has never gotten worse, thank heavens.

The downside is that her diabetic supplies and precsription meds cost $150 a month alone. (This doesn't include the many supplements she gets) With the constant infections, we are frequent flyers at the vets! I now send them money every month so I have an account built up to draw from.

As she worth it? Absolutely! I love this little girl with all my heart. I don't regret one dime I have ever spent or continue to spend on her.

What I can't handle is the fear, the terror, of losing her everytime she has an episode of seizures, or a flare up of her arthritis, or her diabetes goes out of whack for some reason. At those times I silently curse each and every person along that chain that brought her to the pet store so she could be another cute little doggie in the window, snatched up by some unsuspecting person. Where are any of them, those that made a buck off the suffering of her parents and her grandparents, to hold her when her little body is wracked with seizures? Or to give her the insulin everyday that her body needs to survive since it can't produce its own anymore?

I hope just one person reads Lady's story and does not buy a puppy from a pet shop as a result. And if that person tells another, and so on, maybe we can finally stop the mills.
 

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LadysMom...This is the first time I've heard your story and it is absolutely heartbreaking.
I can't believe her owner tied her to a tree and abandoned her. What a jerk. I wonder how she would feel if she got sick and her family tied her to something and just left her there. I'm so glad that Lady now has someone to return her unconditional love. Kudos to you for being such a good mommy. Also, I've read several stories on here about the puppystores/mills and it just kills me. I feel so sorry for these animals. It's no wonder people want to take them home and love them. They probably look so sad and are just begging to be loved, and it's so easy to love them and feel for them. But I know that everytime one of them are purchased, it opens up a new space for the next unfortunate animal. What a shame. I wish there were laws against this. I too hope that your story gets through to others.
 

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Originally posted by saltymalty+Oct 7 2005, 10:28 AM-->
Originally posted by [email protected] 7 2005, 10:04 AM
Originally posted by [email protected] 7 2005, 10:00 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-Carrie
@Oct 6 2005, 08:48 PM
Truthfully, it doesn't matter how well bred a dog is, they are still susceptible to health problems.  All you can do is watch out for signs, and love him!  

<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107306

While all dogs can contract diseases, those that are not well bred may also have genetic predispositions to certain diseases and conditions which can compromise their health. A breeder who knows what they are doing can reduce those risks substantially. A puppy mill is more interested in breeding dogs for profit, without regard to the future health of the animal. Lady's Mom has posted some wonderful articles on this very subject. I realize that this is a personal choice and I certainly don't intend to offend anyone...to me I would rather not take that risk.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107438


Umm...well, she ALREADY has her fluff-butt...she said she wasn't educated at the time of the purchase (implying she is now) and I was being NICE to her....
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107439
So sorry, I didn't mean to cause a problem here. I was just stating my opinion. I wasn't trying to cast judgment on anyone. I apologize if it sounded that way.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107459
[/B][/QUOTE]

Oh, you DEFINITELY didn't cause any problems... And I don't think you were casting judgement. Your opinion does matter! People DO need to know about puppymills and the heartache getting a pup from one causes. BUT- seeing how she already has Obi, I was just offering her my support. Not much I can do besides that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Originally posted by Teddyandme@Oct 7 2005, 08:38 AM
I unfortunately got my Teddy from there.  Denise and Chico also got one of her little ones from them.

I was lied to and told they breed the puppies in home...I found them not on the internet but in the paper.  They said that they were home raised and that they only did a couple litters a year...I spoke to them about 6 times before I went and was horrified when I pulled up and saw a store front. 

I have since done research with a site that I got from LadyMom and found that Teddy was breed in MN at a place that had 69 breeding femals.....I still get sick to my stomach when I think about it.  Teddy has allergies to both chicken and beef which I discovered right away...he also has problems with the vacinations.  He is however at this moment in time...healthy.  He is 16 months old.  He is very smart - potty trained immediately to the puppy pads....learns tricks so quickly that I have to really think to come up with new ones. 

Are you having problems with your little one.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=107421
[/QUOTE]

right now i dont think he has food allergies, but he does not react well to shots. They said his breeder was norma hemelbach or something like that.
 

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My Missy was purchased from a family who had mama and papa as their pets and bred them. They were well cared for as were the pups.. and all living in the house as members of the family.. However Mama and papa were pet store pups!
the genetic problems were passed onto Missy... she had 'issues' from a very early age.. they continued to mount thru her life.
Now that being said and feel I can't add anything to the good info already stated regarding the petstore/puppymill..

Now on to you pup.. I suggest you have full blood panel done early on... full panels give great insight to what is going on behind the scenes..though not everything is covered.. it gives a pretty good picture of how the major organs are functioning..
This will give you a baseline for comparisons in the future which will allow you to pick up on any problems that might crop up in the future.. Have them done in the future every few of years or so.. this will show if things are staying in normal range or starting to go "off" a bit.. if this happens then further investigating can be done... for that particular area.. and adjustments if necessary can be made early on.. and hopefully detect/ward off things before they become a problem.
I know Missy did as well as she did because we caught many things early.
I also believe in taking in urine and stool samples and have thm checked at every yearly "wellness" check up.
If you feel ANYTHING is "off" follow your "gut".. " have it checked immediately..
Feed good quality food to help maintain a good healthy system.
Avoid as many vaccines as is possible.. opt for titers if necessary to be assured protection is there.
I think being aware there is a chance of potential problems will be half the battle.. you are doing just that... and that will help catch and nip things in the bud.

Terry, Angel Missy and little Naddie
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

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As Missy's mom said, being aware of potential problems is half the battle, so it's best you find out where Obi came from and take it from there. If you are diligent about vet care, frequent blood panels, etc., you really can troubleshoot. I also can't stress enough how important it is to set up some sort of savings account now, while Obi is young, so if any problems do arise later on, you are financially prepared. Lady's problems started almost immediately after I adopted her and I spent close to $1,000 on her in the first 6 weeks or so just with tests, eye surgery, etc. As she just kept getting new diseases, her 5th, 6th and 7th years were financially pretty draining.
 
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