Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

Registered
Joined
13,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have considered the possibility of fostering when I cut back further in work possibly after the first of the year...
I know Naddie and Quincy would be great with any pooch.... they love all people and other dogs. ( Naddie immediately.. Quincy is reserved but doesn't have a 'problem'.. )

I'd really like to know exactly what is involved when fostering... I'd really like to know all details and pointers. I've read and admired so many here who do this... I'm not even sure I'm made of the 'right-stuff'. I just keep seeing such a demand!
I know we've seen so many blessed pooches go from point "A" to point "B" but am quite aware that a lot of effort ( that we don't know or see) has gone into that end.

Such as: isolate from homed dogs first or no? or does it depend on the pooch?
Those who have their own dogs.. do your dogs have any issues with new rescues?I assume vetting is done immediately? Does the vet need approval from the rescue?
What are the financial responsibilities of fostermom vs the rescue?
Since I'm in Northeast Would it be best I go with Metropolitan Maltese rescue rather than applying to AMR/NorthCentral?
Does a new fostermom get some 'mentoring' before a placement?
If there is a specific 'difficult' issue.. say food aggression... would someone advise as to work on this?... especially since no pooch of mine has had problems whatsoever with this... I'd have no experience as to how to handle.
For a pooch that needs potty training... do most opt for the pee-pads or outside? Is one type training a more 'adoptable pooch' than the other?
Though I really lean to wanting to foster the older ones.... my concern is the financial cost for meds etc. ( In addition to my babies who are healthy now but heading toward the 'senior years' and don't feel I want to 'threaten' all care for them as they grow older... and if pretty much retired... financial 'burden' does have to be considered, unfortunately. )

Is there ever a need for a temporary-foster?..meaning just to get a pooch out of a shelter/bad situation till a more perm. foster home is found? My thinking is I'd likely only handle one at a time but would take a second/third for a short term if needed IF that is even ever done.

I couldn't even consider this until sometime next year but have thought of it so much and would like to know some info now.... I may not even be a good 'candidate'.
I'd like input as to what "I" need to consider when doing fostering.
Any and all information would be appreciated ... even if those think it not good idea for me... I won't be offended... I respect honest opinions. :thumbsup:
I know many questions.... and maybe some 'silly' ones.. but it's something that I feel I'd want to be sure I understood the pros and cons. It'd not a commitment I'd take lightly and want to know all I can.
 

Registered
Joined
1,193 Posts
I have not fostered but I just wanted to say I think just the idea that you want to do it sounds like you would be wonderful.
I bet it's a learning as you go experience and you already sound dedicated to it.:aktion033:
Maybe start also with asking those patient people that set up outside with adoptions at the Petsmart,Petco,etc stores how they handle some of the issues?
Good Luck and Bless you.
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,223 Posts
I have considered the possibility of fostering when I cut back further in work possibly after the first of the year...
I know Naddie and Quincy would be great with any pooch.... they love all people and other dogs. ( Naddie immediately.. Quincy is reserved but doesn't have a 'problem'.. )

I'd really like to know exactly what is involved when fostering... I'd really like to know all details and pointers. I've read and admired so many here who do this... I'm not even sure I'm made of the 'right-stuff'. I just keep seeing such a demand!
I know we've seen so many blessed pooches go from point "A" to point "B" but am quite aware that a lot of effort ( that we don't know or see) has gone into that end.

Such as: isolate from homed dogs first or no? or does it depend on the pooch?
Those who have their own dogs.. do your dogs have any issues with new rescues?I assume vetting is done immediately? Does the vet need approval from the rescue?
What are the financial responsibilities of fostermom vs the rescue?
Since I'm in Northeast Would it be best I go with Metropolitan Maltese rescue rather than applying to AMR/NorthCentral?
Does a new fostermom get some 'mentoring' before a placement?
If there is a specific 'difficult' issue.. say food aggression... would someone advise as to work on this?... especially since no pooch of mine has had problems whatsoever with this... I'd have no experience as to how to handle.
For a pooch that needs potty training... do most opt for the pee-pads or outside? Is one type training a more 'adoptable pooch' than the other?
Though I really lean to wanting to foster the older ones.... my concern is the financial cost for meds etc. ( In addition to my babies who are healthy now but heading toward the 'senior years' and don't feel I want to 'threaten' all care for them as they grow older... and if pretty much retired... financial 'burden' does have to be considered, unfortunately. )

Is there ever a need for a temporary-foster?..meaning just to get a pooch out of a shelter/bad situation till a more perm. foster home is found? My thinking is I'd likely only handle one at a time but would take a second/third for a short term if needed IF that is even ever done.

I couldn't even consider this until sometime next year but have thought of it so much and would like to know some info now.... I may not even be a good 'candidate'.
I'd like input as to what "I" need to consider when doing fostering.
Any and all information would be appreciated ... even if those think it not good idea for me... I won't be offended... I respect honest opinions. :thumbsup:
I know many questions.... and maybe some 'silly' ones.. but it's something that I feel I'd want to be sure I understood the pros and cons. It'd not a commitment I'd take lightly and want to know all I can.
I think you would make a wonderful fostermom. :thumbsup:

A lot of your questions can be answered with a very ambiguous it depends. :huh:

I have fostered for three different groups. And added all together we have had 30+ fosters taken into our home for varying lengths of times over the years.

I find that the biggest challenge for anyone who wants to foster can be the ability to let go. So many foster moms and dads end up keeping their charges and this can lead to a very short term as a foster parent. The vast majority of foster parents end up no longer fostering because they can't stop themselves from adopting. While it is wonderful that a precious match has been made when that happens, it is part of the reason there is always a need for new fosters. I found the most rewarding part of fostering came with witnessing the creation of a new family.

As for isolating when the dog comes home, sometimes it is necessary and always caution should be taken introducing a new dog into your mix. However, unless there is a specific issue, rarely does it take long for the dogs to adjust to another dog's presence. (My very first foster was vicious with other dogs and had to be separated at all times, I had another that had mange and he had to be kept in isolation, but those were the only two where isolation lasted for more than the initial day or two).

Vetting is done immediately in the case of a dog that has an unknown history. Many of the dogs are owner turn ins. You get a vet record with those dogs and yes typically get them checked as soon as possible, but it is not always straight away.

Different rescues handle the vet visits different ways. Sometimes if you are near other volunteers the dog may have already been taken to the vet or there may be a specific vet used by the rescue. That has been the case for the most recent group I worked with. However, the other groups I worked with left vet visits up to me. I submitted the bills after the fact to the treasurer.

Typically, the rescue pays for vet bills. Day to day expenses such as food are your own responsibility. Grooming varies. Some groups can afford it. Some groups expect/hope you will be able to do that.

Mentoring also varies. But you should have plenty of resources just among your friends in the Maltese community should you encounter a dog with needs. I had several dogs that came with behavioral issues and I am have been very grateful for the many people who offered me suggestions. I did find that solutions like always feeding separately became standard routine in my house. Most owners do seem to prefer outdoor potty training. So most rescues are trained that way.

Absolutely, it is much easier to adopt out young, healthy, well-groomed dogs, than it is to adopt out the needy ones. And one of the things I used to find very frustrating was how many people seemed to come to rescue thinking it was a "cheap" alternative. Or they wanted to make themselves feel better by adopting rather than going to get a puppy from a breeder--but they wanted a dog that was a puppy (and would make the requests as if they were shopping in a retail store--under 5 pounds, babydoll face, under a year old, ideally female, potty-trained, etc).

As for fostering one at a time, one thing I found surprising is how many foster dogs come in pairs. I would place one pair and then next thing I knew I had another pair in my house. I did get a little burned out with not taking a break for myself and my own dogs especially as my own dogs all became older and needier.

I stopped completely for a while and have agreed to help out on a much more limited basis more recently. I think setting limits is also one of the important challenges you have as a foster mom or dad.

But for sure, it is a truly rewarding experience and I am grateful for each little soul that came into our lives and more grateful for the loving families they helped to complete. :wub:
 

Registered
Joined
10,369 Posts
I currently have TEN dogs in my condo. It's great.

Four are mine, four are fosters, and I'm sitting Gio and Snoopy.

Jops: Yep, she shoves dogs in our face on a weekly basis.

Frankie: But we do love them, Jops.

Jops: Oh yes, Franny, as long as they stay OUT OF MY FACE!

Frankie: Not to be rude, Jops, but they do stay out of your face.
They are afraid of you. I do have a blast with them. I know I'm
being bold here, but, since my Sammie left us, I have been pretty
lonely. You don't play much with me. You are kind of a bitch.
Just sayin', you are very rude to visitors.

Jops: I play with you all the time, my BFF. You just don't stop with the
playing. I love when a newbie comes along. Yep, keeps you busy, and away from me. I love you, girlfriend. You just BUG, and you're the ONLY one I will put up with.

LBB: Hey, where's the newbie? I can't see him. I LOVE newbies.
Where's Big Ear Bette??

Jops: We don't have a newbie, you moron. I can't stand you,
you idiot. Oh, and Big Ears, is under the bed. I wonder why.
 

Registered
Joined
13,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I currently have TEN dogs in my condo. It's great.

Four are mine, four are fosters, and I'm sitting Gio and Snoopy.

.
Deb, I couldn't come to close to doing what YOU do! You have a special 'gift" that enables you to 'just make it work'...even with so many! God love you for that!

Carina and Starry... appreciate your words of support and info provided.

I do know that the 'giving-up' would be very hard, I know it is for all the fostermoms/dads. I know that this would be the most difficult of the whole process, but if I did indeed do this I would be committed to purpose and the 'need' and focus on the adoption as an 'opening' for another... at least that's my 'logical' thinking at the moment! LOL
 

Registered
Joined
2,327 Posts
Terry, I agree with all of what Carina has said. I think the key to a good fostering experience is to start out working with a well established rescue group who has specific procedures in place. MetroMalts, AMA Rescue and Northcentral Maltese have all beein doing this for a very long time and will be with you every step of the way. They will be very open about their policies and their expectations. And you should never have to limit yourself to working with only one rescue group. If you agree to foster a dog for one group then you abide by the policies set for that foster dog. If you have room in your home for a second foster for another group so long as you abide by the policies of the second group there should be no problems. Rescue groups shouldn't have an issue if a foster home is willing to work with multiple groups and/or multiple breeds. "Noncompete" clauses should have no place in the rescue world ... it's supposed to be about the safety and well-being of the dogs!

Every dog is different and many of them don't show their true personality immediately so close observation is a must for those first several days and separation is a good idea when you go out or are busy doing other things and cannot keep a close eye on interaction among all the dogs. I generally will bring a foster dog to the vet for a wellness check as soon as possible and will keep the foster separate until that vet visit if I have no medical info available. As a rescue group, we will always reimburse the foster for vet care or will pay the vet directly via credit card. BUT we do require that our foster contact us or have their vet contact us before any out of the ordinary procedures are done (like a vet saying that surgical correction of a luxating patella is an immediate "must"). If a foster requires a vet prescribed food we will cover the cost of food. Most often the foster dog can eat the same food your own dogs eat and generally the foster mom/dad will absorb that cost. If the dog needs grooming (haircut) we will generally pay for that, too, but expect that general bathing and nail care will be done by the foster home.

The foster situation can get sticky if there is not a clear understanding between the foster and the rescue group about who does the screening and who has the final decision about placement. We always look to the foster home for input, screening, home visit, etc. but we have always made known that we, the rescue group, make the final decision on placement. And that's because of the liability issues.

Personally, because of your close proximity, I would recommend that you start out by contacting MetroMalts. They are very active, very established and would be a great source for mentoring. They may be having some upcoming social events that you could attend to meet some of their group face to face, ask all your questions, and get a good feel for the folks you would be working with and leaning on for advice and support while fostering a dog for them.
 

Super Moderator
Joined
10,176 Posts
My Tessa started out as a foster - yes, I "failed," but I also think she chose me as well. And, if I wasn't working as much, I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

The dogs I've fostered for NMR were up to date on everything before they came to my house. NMR covered any vet costs while they were fosters, I just had to provide food. And I did keep them separate until I knew they were OK with each other.

Good luck to you - you will be a wonderful foster mommy!
 

Premium Member
Joined
8,543 Posts
I find that the biggest challenge for anyone who wants to foster can be the ability to let go
That's the main reason I won't consider foster. I would not be able to let go and my husband even less than me.
 

Registered
Joined
13,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everyone! I truly appreciate all the input/advice! It's ssomething I've thought about doing for a long time... ( for when I tretired/ cut back on work). As the time draws nearer to that I've been thinking about it more and more.
Having seen many 'pleas' on TV for the need for fostering for all breeds, even he is not against it per se as he once was.... though I do think he'd have a hard time 'giving-up' as much as me and something we do have to consider seriously. That's why I wanted to get people's advice and opinions.
We have lots of "pros' ( we're both home 99% of time as I work from home and pooches pooches accompany me). We're patient with 'issues" and do think I in particular have somewhat of an instinct' to work with most issues. However the 'cons" do have to be taken into account as well.
Any other opinions/advice/ experiences are still appreciated.
 

Registered
Joined
10,369 Posts
Terry, I have been involved with animal rescue for 25-years.

Letting them go, is the BEST part. Do I cry a million tears?
You bet I do. But the awesome homes, we place them in,
and the stories, are beyond my dreams for them.

Casa del Caca is not exactly paradise, it's a safe haven, where
dogs are loved, and cared for. Yep, until they find their perfect home.

I remember being so scared when Winter left. He was a foster for
over a year. Steve and Peg picked him up, and took him to his new
home in Arizona. Gosh, what a wonderful home he has.

My newest, wee little Bette, is such a doll. She cracks me up.
I can't imagine she was to be euthanized within days. I will miss her,
too, when she goes to her forever home. Once again I will cry.
But they will be happy tears. And, yep, more tears will be shed
for the next one.

These babies deserve a chance. Foster, if you can. You would be
the perfect foster mom. We love you Terry ~ :grouphug:
 

Registered
Joined
7,034 Posts
I have fostered three dogs in the last several years. One I kept, Cassie. I still keep in touch with one of the foster's family. She was placed in an great home. I had to give up fostering last year when my brother became very ill, and I had to travel a great deal. I hope to be able to do it again in the near future. I was very impressed with the screening process for foster parents and permanent homes. Right now I am on several rescue groups lists for temporary fostering, transport, and home visits. There is a lot of support from the rescue groups. You always have someone you can call for advise. I am sure you would make a wonderful foster mom. The worst that can happen is that you might wind up with three dogs.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top