Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Quinn Poser lifts his leg only outside and tries to mark as much as he can b/4 he runs out of juice. I would like to have a female someday. When is the best time to allow him to mate? He is only 5mos old.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
I don't know you or your dog's story but I would not let him "mate" and I would get him fixed. They can be fixed starting at 5 months.

Also, dogs don't mate for the fun of it, they do so to make puppies. So a "one time experience" would result in puppies and if this dog isn't a show dog of high breeding and you are not a breeder then the puppies are not necessary or responsible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,741 Posts
if u just plan on breeding him once...i say fix him. its not worth it to him or the female that u get. esp. for the female. if she is fixed before she goes into heat it decreases her chances of getting mammary cancer by 100% and after the first heat it decreases like 75-50% and drops more after that. for him he can develop marking in ur house (although i hear it is possible to break them of this habit, it is a lot of work), when he gets older his prostate will enlarge (gauranteed if not neutered) and this can lead to costipation, prastatic cancers etc, also having his testicles he has some chances of getting testicular cancer. so if u dont want to become a breeder i say neuter him. sure its fun to have little puppies and watch them develop...but i say the risks out weigh the benefits.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,482 Posts
And why is it that you want him to mate? The conventional wisdom these days is that responsible pet ownership includes spaying girls before the first heat and neutering boys before sexual maturity, generally doing it around 6 months for Malts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,863 Posts
you should definitely talk to a breeder before trying to breed dogs. it freaks the heck out of me. LOL. isnt Charmypoo a breeder? i dont remember, sorry.


i just dont like the idea of having complications and the possibility of the babies dying or the mom dying, or the mom needing a c-section.


i hope you get all the info you need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
I'm interested to find out the reasons you have for wanting to mate him? I'm sure you've been doing extensive research for many years on the breed standard and have talked to multiple amounts of breeders in order reep the benifits of their experience. I'm certain you understand all of the potencial risks for both dog and bitch and are more than willing to take a bitch to the emergency vet in the middle of the night and spend $2500.00 knowing that it's possible that you won't have any wheps or even their mother with you when you leave that office. And isn't it funny, (and I'm sure you'll agree with me here
) how some people think that good breeders accually make allot of money when you and I both know that by the time a litter goes to their new home most breeders are lucky if they break even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,288 Posts
In order for him to be ready to mate you need to:

1. Show him to his championship or send him out with a handler to finish.

2. Test his bile acids, certify his knees with OFA, have an annual eye exam by a veterinary ophthalmologist, and have a thyoid panel done for starters. Any other health problems like allergies may also preclude him from being a candidate for breeding.

3. He should be at least 2 years old. There is no rush to breed a male. I would probably wait longer unless you are breeding a litter to keep yourself to see what he produces early on.

4. If this is your first stud dog, you should have all bitches he is bred to, including any of your own, pre-approved by his breeder. It takes years to really learn about canine structure and get a decent grasp on genetics. Be sure you keep under your mentor's wing for a while. The breeder also knows a lot about what is behind him and you need to learn about that to select good matches for him.

5. Breeding a stud is not to be taken lightly. If your dog produces a health problem, you are resonsible for it as is the bitch's owner. The stud fee does not waive your responsibility for what your dog produces. Are you prepared to assist with the costs of expensive surgery or reimbursing the purchase price of a pup? If you breed him to your own bitch, you are solely responsible for this. Liver shunt surgery can cost $3,000 or more!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Originally posted by JMM@Jan 9 2005, 01:21 PM
In order for him to be ready to mate you need to:

1. Show him to his championship or send him out with a handler to finish.

2. Test his bile acids, certify his knees with OFA, have an annual eye exam by a veterinary ophthalmologist, and have a thyoid panel done for starters. Any other health problems like allergies may also preclude him from being a candidate for breeding.

3. He should be at least 2 years old. There is no rush to breed a male. I would probably wait longer unless you are breeding a litter to keep yourself to see what he produces early on.

4. If this is your first stud dog, you should have all bitches he is bred to, including any of your own, pre-approved by his breeder. It takes years to really learn about canine structure and get a decent grasp on genetics. Be sure you keep under your mentor's wing for a while. The breeder also knows a lot about what is behind him and you need to learn about that to select good matches for him.

5. Breeding a stud is not to be taken lightly. If your dog produces a health problem, you are resonsible for it as is the bitch's owner. The stud fee does not waive your responsibility for what your dog produces. Are you prepared to assist with the costs of expensive surgery or reimbursing the purchase price of a pup? If you breed him to your own bitch, you are solely responsible for this. Liver shunt surgery can cost $3,000 or more!
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=28589
[/QUOTE]


Thank you all for taking the time to respond to my posting. I am just interested in learning all I can about this wonderful breed. His health and life is as important to me as loving him. Being a new Maltese owner I was just collecting information.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top