Maltese Dogs Forum : Spoiled Maltese Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, for a little while now I have been thinking about getting a rescue in addition to my Kylee. Of course, I wouldnt be doing this right away since she is still a puppy but I guess I'm the kind of person that needs to get things done waaaay ahead of time. So I've been searching around and there is a group called East Coast Asian Dog Rescue or somethiing like that and I think I like them and would eventually like to get a dog from them. My question is...how hard is it to get approval? Is it like being accepted into an ivy league school? Is my age going to be a factor (I'm 23), the fact that I dont have kids yet but might in like 10 years? Is my living in an apartment going to be a factor? I feel like my shot at winning the lottery is better than getting approved for a rescue
. Any input is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,659 Posts
It is tough getting approved to adopt a rescue. I have heard some people complain about it, but if you look at from the standpoint of the rescue group, it makes sense.

All dogs who come into rescue have been abandoned by their owners for some reason and it does impact all of them emotionally even in the best cases. When a rescue group is entrusted with placing them in another home, their job is to make sure that they are never ever uprooted again, that this time it really will be forever.

So they look to place their dogs in the most stable homes possible. College students, renters, anyone whose lifestyle is temporary and could change dramatically over the next 15 years or so are high risk. I know one rescue person who said that she steers away from young people who are planning on having children as the birth of a child is one of the #1 reasons a dog gets turned over to rescue. Also, Maltese and small children are not a good mix.

On the plus side, though, the fact that you already have a Maltese and will have vet references is important.

There are many other ways to adopt a rescue besides through a rescue group. More purebred dogs end up in shelters than people realize and many shelters have a sign-up list for a particular breed. Your vet is also a great resource as that's often the first place an owner who must give up a pet contacts. Check newspaper ads as, like Spottie Poo did with Lizzie, many people advertise an adult dog for adoption there. Also, contact breeders. Many have retirees they are looking to place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Originally posted by LadysMom@Sep 15 2005, 08:37 AM
It is tough getting approved to adopt a rescue. I have heard some people complain about it, but if you look at from the standpoint of the rescue group, it makes sense.

All dogs who come into rescue have been abandoned by their owners for some reason and it does impact all of them emotionally even in the best cases. When a rescue group is entrusted with placing them in another home, their job is to make sure that they are never ever uprooted again, that this time it really will be forever.

So they look to place their dogs in the most stable homes possible. College students, renters, anyone whose lifestyle is temporary and could change dramatically over the next 15 years or so are high risk. I know one rescue person who said that she steers away from young people who are planning on having children as the birth of a child is one of the #1 reasons a dog gets turned over to rescue. Also, Maltese and small children are not a good mix.

On the plus side, though, the fact that you already have a Maltese and will have vet references is important.

There are many other ways to adopt a rescue besides through a rescue group. More purebred dogs end up in shelters than people realize and many shelters have a sign-up list for a particular breed. Your vet is also a great resource as that's often the first place an owner who must give up a pet contacts. Check newspaper ads as, like Spottie Poo did with Lizzie, many people advertise an adult dog for adoption there. Also, contact breeders. Many have retirees they are looking to place.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=99833
[/QUOTE]


Thanks! I can completely understand how I would be considered a high-risk person from the standpoint of a rescue group and honestly, looking at me on paper, I probably wouldnt approve myself
. I mean, I know how I feel about my dog and that nothing could ever make me give her up, children, a move, etc...but what I can tell someone and what they can prove are completely different things and its their job to prove that someone will give a particular dog their forever home. When the time is right for me to add another dog to my household, I will explore your other suggestions...Thanks again! :) (sometimes you just need someone else to point something out to you for you to realize it yourself)
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top