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wow those are some gorgeous pups
 

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Oh they are both so adorable...if only I had $2000 extra dollars
It stinks..I would really love to get a friend for Kylee. Maybe I should wait until she at least potty trained though!
 

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Sure they are adorable. At 2,000 $ a piece they should be. Sorry but I don't agree with those prices. Cheaper ones are adorable too.
 

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Occassionally, I have adults available for pet homes.
These are adults retired from breeding and showing. These
dogs will require extra attention from patient prospective
new owners for them to acclimate smoothly to a new home.
My retired dogs are placed for the cost of spaying them,
updating their vaccinations and having their teeth cleaned.
Any shipping costs would be at the new owners expense.
These dogs will need homes with prospective owners that
are prepared to re-potty train these dogs if needed and
that have the time to spend to help make the dog's
transition to a new home smoother. Adopting a retired
or rescue dog requires a special patient person that
has had pets in the past.[/B]
This is a quote from their website. I am wondering about the way their breeding dogs are cared for. Why should prospective owners be more patient with those dogs. If they are part of the family at the kennel, there should not be a problem going to another family. How come you have to re-potty train ? You should not need to be more patient with a retired dog then with a puppy. In fact, I think you need more patience with a puppy. From my standpoint, those retired dogs should be easier. Aren't they trained in obedience ? potty trained ? Of course there will be "accidents" on the start, but a dog who is potty trained will not take long to be housebroken in his new home. When I read that quote, it comes to my mind that those dogs are kept in kennels and I not even want to say what else I think.
 

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Originally posted by MalteseJane@Jul 19 2005, 07:00 PM
Sure they are adorable. At 2,000 $ a piece they should be. Sorry but I don't agree with those prices. Cheaper ones are adorable too.
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[/QUOTE]

It is a lot of money for a pet quality dog. I know that's what the prices are but it really is a lot of money. Someone in my position really couldn't afford that. However, we do and are capable of providing any and all costs for health problems that may arise for our baby (credit cards + loans). I don't know...
 

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Originally posted by MalteseJane@Jul 19 2005, 10:17 PM
QUOTE
Occassionally, I have adults available for pet homes.
These are adults retired from breeding and showing. These
dogs will require extra attention from patient prospective
new owners for them to acclimate smoothly to a new home.
My retired dogs are placed for the cost of spaying them,
updating their vaccinations and having their teeth cleaned.
Any shipping costs would be at the new owners expense.
These dogs will need homes with prospective owners that
are prepared to re-potty train these dogs if needed and
that have the time to spend to help make the dog's
transition to a new home smoother. Adopting a retired
or rescue dog requires a special patient person that
has had pets in the past.
This is a quote from their website. I am wondering about the way their breeding dogs are cared for. Why should prospective owners be more patient with those dogs. If they are part of the family at the kennel, there should not be a problem going to another family. How come you have to re-potty train ? You should not need to be more patient with a retired dog then with a puppy. In fact, I think you need more patience with a puppy. From my standpoint, those retired dogs should be easier. Aren't they trained in obedience ? potty trained ? Of course there will be "accidents" on the start, but a dog who is potty trained will not take long to be housebroken in his new home. When I read that quote, it comes to my mind that those dogs are kept in kennels and I not even want to say what else I think.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=82905
[/B][/QUOTE]

I don't know about that particular situation but I think any time a dog goes to a new home there can be potty training issues ... as the dog has to learn a new routine, etc. And also, the retiree is used to being around lots of dogs and a certain daily routine. In a new home the dog could be the only dog and will have to adjust to that. I just think that after five or so years of living a certain life that it is always an adjustment to go to a new home.
 

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One of my friends just adopted a retired breeder. She was used to being around 8 other dogs and was able to potty outside as she pleased...now she is in a home where she is the only dog. My friend seemed to think that just because she was potty trained at her prior home...all she had to do was bring her home and give her the run of the house and Spring would know how, where and when to go potty. Needless to say, there are numerous adjustment issues they are working thru together. I think the perception of some folks is that just because they are getting an adult and not a puppy, they are getting a perfect dog that will not need retraining or have behavioral issues. Sorry..but I think it is commendable that Rhapsody tries to debunk this misconception. What is so wrong with that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Originally posted by Pippinsmom@Jul 19 2005, 10:24 PM
I think the perception of some folks is that just because they are getting an adult and not a puppy, they are getting a perfect dog that will not need retraining or have behavioral issues.  Sorry..but I think it is commendable that Rhapsody tries to debunk this misconception.  What is so wrong with that?
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[/QUOTE]
I agree with you.

By the way is that Nikki's mom, Spring?
 

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I think you all raise some wonderful points. I think there are people who expect an adult dog (or cat, for that matter) to instantly adjust to their new situation. I think that puppies are probably easier to train because there are fewer bad habits to break.

As far as the price is concerned, for a pup sired by Thriller, I think that $2000 is not unreasonable. Rhapsody has a wonderful program with beautiful animals. We paid $2000 for a female pet and I personally think we got a bargain. She is priceless to us. But I am realistic and I know that there are folks out there that cannot afford that price for a puppy. Fortunately, we all have free choice and the ability to decide for ourselves how much we are willing to spend.
 

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I don't know anything about Rhapsody and how their dogs are kept, but I do know about two other "named" breeders whose dogs are kept in crates for the majority of the day. One keeps hers in a building on her property, in crates, and they never get out to run and play. The second has a deck area off her building where hers can get out for a little exercise when they are allowed out of their crate.
 

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Originally posted by MomtwoMaltmuffins+Jul 20 2005, 11:08 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-MalteseJane
@Jul 19 2005, 09:17 PM
QUOTE
<div class='quotemain'>Occassionally, I have adults available for pet homes.
These are adults retired from breeding and showing. These
dogs will require extra attention from patient prospective
new owners for them to acclimate smoothly to a new home.
My retired dogs are placed for the cost of spaying them,
updating their vaccinations and having their teeth cleaned.
Any shipping costs would be at the new owners expense.
These dogs will need homes with prospective owners that
are prepared to re-potty train these dogs if needed and
that have the time to spend to help make the dog's
transition to a new home smoother. Adopting a retired
or rescue dog requires a special patient person that
has had pets in the past.
This is a quote from their website. I am wondering about the way their breeding dogs are cared for. Why should prospective owners be more patient with those dogs. If they are part of the family at the kennel, there should not be a problem going to another family. How come you have to re-potty train ? You should not need to be more patient with a retired dog then with a puppy. In fact, I think you need more patience with a puppy. From my standpoint, those retired dogs should be easier. Aren't they trained in obedience ? potty trained ? Of course there will be "accidents" on the start, but a dog who is potty trained will not take long to be housebroken in his new home. When I read that quote, it comes to my mind that those dogs are kept in kennels and I not even want to say what else I think.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=82905
[/B][/QUOTE]


I wonder the same too, sure going from any home to anyother there adjustment periods. BUT it sounds to me that they are kept in kennels. How much interaction do they get with people? Do they even get to leave the kennel for exercise, and if so for how long, 5 - 30 minutes a day? I do not see much life in that being confined to kennel life for 5 - 6 years. She is a big breeder so I have my doubts they are inside her house living the life of Riley. Sorry if I stepped on toes but I just do not agree with how some of this so called high end breeders keep their dogs.
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[/B][/QUOTE]

I think we need to be very careful about assumptions and speaking negatively about a breeder in a public forum when we don't have first-hand information to back up what we say.
 

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! Wow, wish I had 2k and was ready for a pup! That Thiller pup is gorgeous! I always wonder why they ended up not showing a pup when they obviously kept him as a potential? Is it his bite, size, coat attitude.........etc.? Not that it really matters so much, I'm just curious. Rhapsody would be one of the kennels at the top of my list, especially if I lived closer.
 
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