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Welcome to ASPCA News Alert, the weekly newsletter of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.



HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? NOT WITH DISULFOTON, PLEASE!
Will you be planting roses or other floral plants in your garden this year? While systemic insecticides—those that are absorbed throughout the whole plant via the roots—are effective at eliminating pesky aphids and bugs from delicate flowering plants, certain types can be extremely dangerous to pets.

“Disulfoton is a very potent systemic organophosphate insecticide that works by affecting the nervous systems of insects,” says Dana Farbman, CVT, of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC). “Unfortunately, disulfoton’s neurologic effects are not limited to bugs—and therefore dogs, cats and other pets can be susceptible to poisoning as well.” Depending on the amount ingested, this insecticide can cause vomiting, diarrhea, elevated heart rate, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness, tremors, seizures, coma—and potentially, death. Farbman offer the following tips to keep your pet safe:

*Exercise extreme caution when using insecticides such as disulfoton. Always read and follow label directions for safe use and storage.
* Potted roses and certain other plants may have already been treated with disulfoton prior to being sold; please check with your local nursery or lawn and garden store beforehand, so you can be sure to plant them in areas inaccessible to pets.
* Disulfoton may be mixed with organic fertilizers, which can be attractive to dogs.
* If you plan to use disulfoton, please ensure that it is applied only in areas that are completely inaccessible to animals. Store unused product in a secure container or cabinet out of pets’ reach.

If you suspect that your pet may have ingested a product containing disulfoton—or any other potentially toxic substance—please contact your veterinarian or the APCC’s 24-hour hotline at (888) 426-4435. For more on pet poison prevention, visit the APCC online.
 

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Thanks so much for this helpful information!

I don't have roses but this is still good to know. I used to have all sorts of flowers planted in my garden/patio area but now I don't have any because I feel it is safer for K & C to play out there without possibly getting in to the plants and any soil amendments the people who plant for me might have added.
 

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But if there is no insecticide on there, it is ok...right?

Brinkley chewed up a rose that Emily picked me off one of our bushes last night...I don't spray them.
 

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That really good information, We have roses, but I plant garlic around them to keep aphids away. Companion planting is the way to go. So far it has worked.
Now if i could jus fine something to keep the carpintor bees away from our deck...
 

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We have these three in our garden,

The puppies don't pay any attention to them.
Hyacinth (Hyacinth orientalis)
Hydrangea (Hydrangea spp.)
Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

Tulips and hyachinth under the tree. I have that garded off.
I wanted to put lilly of the vally but found out it was really bad. I keep anything that has small pods or seeds out of the garden. like Morning glory. They drop a lot of seeds in september.



Hydrangea and rose
 
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