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Discussion Starter #1
When I'm not in the room where I keep Bailey in, he sits by the door like he wants to go out. Do your dogs do that too? Also, I leave the kennel door open all night in case he has to go to the bathroom. Sometimes he goes on the floor right near the box during the night. Wondered if you keep your puppies in the kennel all night. Wouldn't that be too long?
 

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I'm wondering why you just keep him in one room and not have him wherever you go in the house? Maltese have an instinctual need to be with their people.

Our babies are in every room with us. We never kennel them.
 

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When my pups were younger and not potty trained I would keep them gated in the kitchen when I couldn't be watching them, maybe that is what she's talking about.

My yorkie Tinkerbell has been sleeping through the night with no pee pee accidents since she came home. I would put her to bed about 11 and get up with her around 6 a.m. Unless he is very young and very small , he should be ok through the night. It helps them to learn to hold it.
 

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Daezie and Maya follow me around the house all the time. they just want to be with me. If im in the front yard and the gate is at the door. they just sit there looking at me scratching the gate, just waiting for mama to get back in the house



I think your baby wants to be with you and follow you around.
 

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I would have to agree, our little babies love to be near us all the time so they enjoy following us from room to room.
Depending on how young Bailey is he should be ok to hold if you put him out potty before you go to bed and also as soon as you get up in the morning.
Scooby was really good that way and only woke us a few times if he needed to go, then once we had him sleeping on the bed with us he would sleep all night till one of us got up.
If you prefer to have Bailey in his kennel through the night it shouldn't hurt to keep the door shut, but I would have him in your room near you so he knows you are close by.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, he's very small and tiny. I also keep him gated in the kitchen with his crate door open. I don't let him outside the kitchen very much because he tends to pee on the carpet instead of going in his litter box. I go in there to play with him but then I leave him alone when he gets too rambunctious and starts biting or if I just want to lay on the couch without having to chase him around so he doesn't pee. When he gets older and more trained, I'll let him be with me more. He's gotten to the point where I can go into the kitchen to get something, and if I don't pay attention to him, he just lays there and looks at me and goes back to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by Msloke+Aug 17 2005, 08:07 PM-->
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@Aug 17 2005, 06:41 PM
Yes, he's very small and tiny.  I also keep him gated in the kitchen with his crate door open.  I don't let him outside the kitchen very much because he tends to pee on the carpet instead of going in his litter box.  I go in there to play with him but then I leave him alone when he gets too rambunctious and starts biting or if I just want to lay on the couch without having to chase him around so he doesn't pee.  When he gets older and more trained, I'll let him be with me more.  He's gotten to the point where I can go into the kitchen to get something, and if I don't pay attention to him, he just lays there and looks at me and goes back to sleep.

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I read someone else's post somewhere that when they were house training their puppy that they put a harness and leash, then basically tied the other end of the leash to themself so it would keep the puppy close by and still could be in other rooms. Makes sense, since they want to be with us anyway and can't run off too easily that way.

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That does make a lot of sense. After I wrote that last post, I went into the kitchen, and he had pooped and peed right next to his box. He always pees in his box. I think he was trying to make a statement.
 

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I truly beleive that our little ones will do anything for us, if we only let them know what we want. Please try the leash method...because you are training your little one to be a loner, and he really wants to be with you. Puppies don't learn what we want by just putting them with the things we want them to do. So if the puppy pad is there and the puppy is there....and you are not to show and congratulate him then all three don't come together. Does that make sense.

Teddy would have been so unhappy if I left him anywhere...and I know I got lucky and he was trained quickly...but part of that was I was with him every minute I was home from work so that I could learn his signs...it does not take long. I gushed all over the boy when he did his business and beleive it or not, still do when I pick up the pooo....and he gets so darn proud of himself...and happy that I am happy.

I know that it sounds like a lot to watch him all the time...but potty training is going to go so much faster if you do. I was able to train Teddy almost 100% in less than two days.

The way you described him sitting by the door just broke me up, as well as him not getting up anymore to greet you....that is what they live for. To be with us and make us happy.
 

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Just remember, they learn from making mistakes. Having an accident is not a bad thing at his age. Everytime he has an accident is an important learning opportunity, for you to say no and show him where you want him to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Right! I'll leave it in the kitchen and train him to go in there when he's in the other room. Thanks for all you guys' input.
 

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Bridge,

At such a young age I don't think it is a bad thing to have a puppy pad in the room you are in, if you think it will help your little one to understand...Teddy's was kept in a spare bedroom and he would take off running when he had to go...too cute. But some need to be reminded...beleive me he will learn that you want him to use the pad and start using in the location you want once he has the routine down.

I am glad you are bringing him in the room with you...I was thinking of him all day today...Teddy loves to be with me and I know that the majority of other malts feel the same way. Your little one will be so happy to be able to snuggle with you.

And you will be rewarded so much because of the love he can share with you.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Last night I tried different things with him, attaching the leash to me, etc. His pan was left in the kitchen, and I made sure that he went in it several times. He had one accident on the carpet, but I think he's getting the hang of it. I was praising him so much that right after he peed in it, he went back in and squatted and nothing came out! :D At night when I'm sleeping, he usually misses the pan to poop for some reason, he does it right near by. Then in the morning I put it in the pan to show him where it goes and leave it there for awhile.

I spent a lot of time with him outside the kitchen last night, but when I needed some peace and quiet, I put him in there. He's very quiet, waiting for me.

Do you know he's a ball of energy, never lays down except for a few seconds, and when it was time to go to bed last night, I heard him squeaking one of his toys. He still wanted to play! I'm sure some of you have dogs like that and others that might like to sleep more. He loves to go outside as well. Well, I've rambled on long enough. Waiting for the blood test results this morning, will let you know.
 

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I know that a Malt puppy can be overwhelming, especially when it is your first. I remember how I was with my first, Rosebud, and how diffierent it was with K & C so I like to help you first-timers so you can benefit from my errors.

One thing I didn't do with Rosebud was cuddle with her a lot or take naps with her. I did like you... when I took a nap, I would put Rosebud in her crate. But with K & C I would let them take a nap with me and of course I still do it. When they were puppies they would snuggle at my neck while I napped and it was pure heaven!! Even though they are full of energy, they seem to follow my lead when it is nap time. You may want to try this ... I think you'll like it a lot!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Originally posted by Kallie/Catcher's Mom@Aug 21 2005, 10:39 AM
I know that a Malt puppy can be overwhelming, especially when it is your first. I remember how I was with my first, Rosebud, and how diffierent it was with K & C so I like to help you first-timers so you can benefit from my errors.

One thing I didn't do with Rosebud was cuddle with her a lot or take naps with her. I did like you... when I took a nap, I would put Rosebud in her crate. But with K & C I would let them take a nap with me and of course I still do it. When they were puppies they would snuggle at my neck while I napped and it was pure heaven!! Even though they are full of energy, they seem to follow my lead when it is nap time. You may want to try this ... I think you'll like it a lot!!
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I could try it, but when I want to nap, he wants to play.
I heard it's not good to give them too much attention/affection as a puppy because we need to be the alpha dog, and they might get spoiled and develop behavioral problems later on. But believe me, I give him lots of it! That's good to know what you said about a Malt puppy.
 

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Originally posted by Bridge+Aug 21 2005, 03:30 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-Kallie/Catcher's Mom
@Aug 21 2005, 10:39 AM
I know that a Malt puppy can be overwhelming, especially when it is your first. I remember how I was with my first, Rosebud, and how diffierent it was with K & C so I like to help you first-timers so you can benefit from my errors.

One thing I didn't do with Rosebud was cuddle with her a lot or take naps with her. I did like you... when I took a nap, I would put Rosebud in her crate. But with K & C I would let them take a nap with me and of course I still do it. When they were puppies they would snuggle at my neck while I napped and it was pure heaven!! Even though they are full of energy, they seem to follow my lead when it is nap time. You may want to try this ... I think you'll like it a lot!!
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I could try it, but when I want to nap, he wants to play.
I heard it's not good to give them too much attention/affection as a puppy because we need to be the alpha dog, and they might get spoiled and develop behavioral problems later on. But believe me, I give him lots of it! That's good to know what you said about a Malt puppy.

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Oh, Bridge, No!! Giving them attention has nothing to do with being alpha and behavioral problems!! Please get a good dog training book. I don't mean that in a sarcastic way, either. It's so hard to write this and have it come out the way I mean it to!!

But a good book will help you understand how dogs think, etc. JMM has recommended some books and I can't remember the names, though, besides Culture Clash, which is a little "heavy" to read.

JMM what are some other good dog training books?
 

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Originally posted by Bridge@Aug 18 2005, 08:22 AM
That does make a lot of sense.  After I wrote that last post, I went into the kitchen, and he had pooped and peed right next to his box.  He always pees in his box.  I think he was trying to make a statement. 

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Bridge,

1. You cannot leave a puppy in a confined room and expect them to potty train themselves. They need to be supervised and rewarded immediately for going in the right spot. Put him on a schedule and take him to his box or outdoors at set times. Have a yummy treat to reward him for going.

2. Puppy biting is a common, normal issue. Yelp when he bites you and ignore him for a few minutes. If he needs a time out to calm down, leave the room for a few minutes.

3. A tired puppy is a good puppy. Play fetch, go for long walks, do some obedience. It sounds like he has a lot of energy to burn.

4. Dogs do not think like humans. They do not defecate and urinate inappropriately to make a statement...he's not housebroken and that's the statement he's making.

5. Giving attention will not make your dog "alpha." Being a pack leader does mean you decide what attention he gets and what he has to do for it. He can sit, down, or do a trick before being picked up, let out the door, pet, has his toy thrown, etc. Obedience classes are also a great relationship builder. Being the pack leader means that he looks to you for guidance. Setting a schedule and giving him structure will do that.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Originally posted by JMM+Aug 21 2005, 05:41 PM-->
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@Aug 18 2005, 08:22 AM
That does make a lot of sense.  After I wrote that last post, I went into the kitchen, and he had pooped and peed right next to his box.  He always pees in his box.  I think he was trying to make a statement.  

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Bridge,

1. You cannot leave a puppy in a confined room and expect them to potty train themselves. They need to be supervised and rewarded immediately for going in the right spot. Put him on a schedule and take him to his box or outdoors at set times. Have a yummy treat to reward him for going.

2. Puppy biting is a common, normal issue. Yelp when he bites you and ignore him for a few minutes. If he needs a time out to calm down, leave the room for a few minutes.

3. A tired puppy is a good puppy. Play fetch, go for long walks, do some obedience. It sounds like he has a lot of energy to burn.

4. Dogs do not think like humans. They do not defecate and urinate inappropriately to make a statement...he's not housebroken and that's the statement he's making.

5. Giving attention will not make your dog "alpha." Being a pack leader does mean you decide what attention he gets and what he has to do for it. He can sit, down, or do a trick before being picked up, let out the door, pet, has his toy thrown, etc. Obedience classes are also a great relationship builder. Being the pack leader means that he looks to you for guidance. Setting a schedule and giving him structure will do that.
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I was just thinking about putting him on a meal schedule, taking it away earlier at night to maybe get him to go sooner so I could be there. I definitely want to take him to an obedience class. How old do they have to be to start? He's about 15 weeks. Thanks for the advice about giving him attention, when to give it and when not. When I look at him, he looks like a 5-year-old little boy, he just needs a little baseball cap.
 
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