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Discussion Starter #1
I saw a cute little male the other day. But it looked different and was curious what others would say here. He was 4 months old and his back sloped up, like his shoulders were lower than the back. He also looked like he was a bit of a bull dog in the front. It's like he could not straighten his front legs all the way out. Like bo-legged. Has anyone seen this before?
 

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The front leg deformity is call chondrodysplasia and can actually cause many problems and require surgical attention depending on the severity.

A dog that is high in the rear is incorrect according to the breed standard. They tend to have a bouncy gait in the rear and now enough rear angulation.
 

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Originally posted by JMM@Apr 25 2005, 03:31 PM
The front leg deformity is call chondrodysplasia and can actually cause many problems and require surgical attention depending on the severity.

A dog that is high in the rear is incorrect according to the breed standard. They tend to have a bouncy gait in the rear and now enough rear angulation.
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Thank you for replying with this information. I did a search on it and it's very good information to know. Most know about luxating patella and such but I have never heard or seen this.

This person is actually an acquaintance and although I don't know her very well I feel like I should say something. Atleast let her know she might have him tested and call the breeder. I hope she got a good health guarantee that covers genetic defects.
 

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I hope it doesn't cause him problems.

The Havanese Club has some nice pictures:

http://www.havanese.org/havaneseHealth.htm#ortho

The Havanese breed also has a very cool health organization. Their website is great:

http://www.havanese.org/heart/chondrodysplasia.htm

One of the vets who founded HEART is a member of the toy club that was just formed near me. I am so impressed with what they've done for the breed. I wish we had something like this for Maltese. I guess I'll just have to keep causing trouble LOL
 

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All I have to do it look at my dog and then look at his personal pharmacy and you bet I'll never stop fighting for health testing in the breed. No dog should be put through so much.
 

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Originally posted by JMM@Apr 25 2005, 05:58 PM
All I have to do it look at my dog and then look at his personal pharmacy and you bet I'll never stop fighting for health testing in the breed. No dog should be put through so much.
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JMM,

I feel extremely angry at the whole 'luxating patella' issue. Although Miko is feeling a ton better, I just don't think its right that breeders go on to breed without giving patellas a second thought. Miko should not have to go through that (no dog should). What also bothers me is that I have seen a few breeders write on forums that the vets "just don't know", and thus this condition could be from trauma not genetics. Well, I would be willing to bet that traumatic luxating patellas are much less common than genetic ones. Plus, if they are not testing their dogs, they don't really know, do they?
 

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A good surgeon taking a decent history and palpating the patellas has a pretty good idea. Also, when they go in surgically, the presence of arthritis and degree of joint deterioration are also good indicators.

Dogs that are jumping up and down off furniture constantly are actually prime candidates for traumatic luxating patellas in their middle age years.

If you OFA patellas at a year old, chances are pretty durn good that the dog hasn't injured them yet unless a traumatic event is known, especially if you are a breeder who is conscious of this.

You can really damage their backs with jumping as well. Get ramps of steps for the furniture if you want your dog to get up and down on their own.

I don't think most breeders are evil people breeding unhealthy dogs purposefully. I do think health testing is a great tool to use to assure that things like injury years down the road doesn't affect you when you look at a pedigree later on. Also, you have a good idea of what you are dealing with and producing when you look at a pedigree and can actually look up the results of health tests. For the next generation of breeders, health testing can be a priceless tool. It certainly offers a great opportunity to look at the improvement of the breed.
 
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