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For all those holding off spaying for "just one litter" for yourself or friends or family. Sorry to say IMO that makes yall no better than a byb or puppymill you probably got your dog from. A quality breeder is more than likely going to sell on a spay nueter contract to prevent this from happening.



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So you want to breed your female. You know what to expect if everything goes right. Your little girl will present you with tiny bundles of joy. She will lovingly nurse them and care for them until they are old enough to be weaned.

You and your family will find great joy in watching and playing with these little dolls, and then when the time is right they will all (or maybe you keep just one) go off to special homes to live out their lives as cherished companions. But have you given consideration to what if something goeswrong? I have listed here a few of the problems that I myself have personal knowledge of. Everything listed has happened either to me or someone I know. These are not isolated incidents. I'm sure other breeders could add miles to my list. Learn by others mistakes!. Let the breeding up to those who know what they are doing, have the experience, know what to expect.

WHAT IF DURING THE BREEDING

1. The stud dog you have chosen is carrying a venereal disease and gives it to your female. She not only doesn't conceive but you have to pay the vet bills to get her infection cleared up and she is now sterile.
2. The stud dog you decided to breed your darling to is not experienced. Once the two dogs are joined tightly in a tie, he decides to chase the neighbors cat out of his yard. He bolts for the cat ripping his penis loose and causing your bitch to hemorrhage from within.
3. Your modest girl decides she doesn't want the attentions of this gigolo mutt chosen for her without her consent. She snaps at him catching her tooth on his loose cheek and rips it open sending blood flying everywhere. He retaliates by sinking his teeth into her left eye.
4. You leave your dog with the stud owner because the breeding is not going very swiftly. In fact , it's been three hours and nothing is happening. The stud owners leave the two dogs alone in the back yard. The dogs get out through a tiny hole in the fence and a truck hits your female.
5. You pay the $250-$1000 stud fee up front figuring you will make that and more back when the pups sell. The breeder guarantees the stud service to work or you can come back again. After 2 months you discover it didn't work and now must wait another 4 months to try again. Of course it doesn't work again, so in another 4 months you take your dog to another male and risk loosing another stud fee.
6. You get her bred. Bring her home. She bothers you so you let her out she is still in heat and still receptive to males. You hear a commotion outside there is your girl tied up with the neighborhood mutt. when she whelps there will need to be DNA tests done on the pups.
7. You get her bred. Bring her home and let her out. (She is still in heat and receptive to other males) but you do not see the neighborhood mutt breed her. The pups are born but look odd. You call the stud owner he suggests DNA testing (At your expense). You have a litter of mutts! What do you do about the ones you have already sold?
8. Or knowing she tied with the neighborhood mutt you decide to terminate the pregnancy and try again being more careful next time. But a few weeks later your female is very sick because you had her given a miss-mate shot creating a hormonal imbalance causing a uterine infection and now she has Pyometra and needs a complete hysterectomy. All plans of getting a litter is gone and your female's life is now in danger if she does not have the operation.

WHAT IF DURING THE BIRTH

1. The puppies are too large for the female. She never goes into labor, the puppies die and she becomes infected by the decaying bodies.
2. The puppies are coming breech and they drown in their own sacks before they can be born.
3. The first puppy is large and breech. When it starts coming your female starts screaming, and before you can stop her she reaches around, grabs the puppy in her teeth and yanks it out killing it instantly.
4. A puppy gets stuck. Neither your female nor you can get it out. You have to race her to the vet. The vet can't get it out either. She has to have an emergency caesarian section of course it is 3:00 am Christmas day.
5. A puppy is coming out breech and dry (the water sack that protects them has burst). It gets stuck. Mom tries to help it out by clamping her teeth over one of the back legs. The head and shoulders are firmly caught. Mom pulls on the leg, hard, peeling the flesh from the leg and leaving a wiggling stump of bone.
6. A dead puppy gets stuck in the birth canal, but your female is well into hard labor. She contracts so hard trying to give birth that her uterus ruptures and she bleeds to death on the way to the vet.

WHAT IF DIRECTLY AFTER THE BIRTH

1. The mother has no idea what to do with a puppy and she drops them out and walks away, leaving them in the sack to drown.
2. The mother takes one look at the puppies, decides they are disgusting droppings and tries to smother them in anything she can find to bury them in.
3. The mother gets too enthusiastic in her removal of the placenta and umbilical cord, and rips the cord out leaving a gushing hole pulsing blood all over you as you try in vain to stop the bleeding.
4. Or, she pulls on the cords so hard she disembowels the puppies as they are born and you have a box full of tiny, kicking babies with a tangle of guts the size of a walnut hanging from their stomachs. Of course all the babies must be put to sleep.
5. What if because of some Hormone deficiency she turns vicious allowing no one near her or the babies, who she refuses to nurse, or you have to interfere with.
6. You notice something protruding from her vagina when you let her out to pee. You take her to the vet to discover a prolapsed uterus, which needs to be removed.

WHAT IF WHEN YOU THINK YOU'RE IN THE CLEAR

1. One or more of the puppies inhaled fluid during birth, pneumonia develops and death occurs within 36 hours.
2. What if the mother's milk goes bad. You lose three of your four puppies before you discover what is wrong. You end up bottle feeding the remaining pup every two hours, day and night. After three days the puppy fades from infection and dies.
3. The puppies develop fading puppy syndrome you lose two. You bottle-feeding or tube feeding the last remaining baby. It begins to choke and despite your efforts to clear the airway, the pup stiffens and dies in your hands.
4. Your female develops mastitis and her breast ruptures.
5. Your female develops a uterine infection from a retained placenta. Her temperature soars to 105. You race her to the vet, he determines she must be spayed. He does the spay in an attempt to save her life, you pay the hundreds of dollars bill. The infection has gone into her blood stream. The infected milk kills all the puppies and the bitch succumbs a day later.
6. All the puppies are fine but following the birth the female develops a hormone imbalance. She becomes a fear biter and anytime anyone tries to touch her she viciously attacks them.
7. Mom and pups seem fine, the puppies are four weeks old and are at their cutest. However, one day one of the puppies disappears. You search everywhere but you can't find it. A few days later another puppy is gone. And another. You can't figure how on earth the puppies are getting out of their safe 4' x 4' puppy pen. Finally there is only one puppy left. The next morning you find the mother chomping contentedly on what is left of the last murdered puppy.

WHAT IF THE NEW HOMES AREN'T SO HAPPY

1. You give a puppy to a friend. Their fence blows down so they tie the puppy outside while they go to work. A roving dog comes along and kills the puppy. Your friend calls you up to tell you about the poor little puppy and asks when you are having more puppies.
2. You sell a puppy to an acquaintance. The next time you see them you ask how the puppy is doing. They tell you that it soiled their new carpet so they took it to the pound
3. You sell a puppy to a friend (you give them a good price and payments). They make a couple of tiny payments. Six months later they move to an apartment. They ask you to take it back. You take it back and of course the payments stop. The dog they returned is so shy, and ill mannered from lack of socialization and training it takes you a year of work providing socializing and training to be able to give it away.
4. You sell a puppy to a wonderful home. They love her like one of the family. At a vet check done by their vet it is determined that the puppy has a heart murmur. (Your vet found nothing when he checked the puppy before it was sold.) They love their puppy and want the best for her. They have an expensive surgery done. The puppy is fine. They sue you for the medical costs. They win, because you did not have a contract stipulating conditions of guarantee and so as breeder you are responsible for the puppy's genetic health.
5. You give a puppy to your mother. She is thrilled. Two years later the puppy starts developing problems. It begins to develop odd symptoms and is suffering. Hundreds and hundreds of dollars worth of tests later it is finally discovered that the dog is suffering from a terminal condition that was inherited. possibly from your female since you know nothing about her family lines.
6. One loving home decides your puppy is untrainable, destructive and wants to return the pup and get a full refund, which you have spent on your vet bills.
7. One loving couple calls you and is very upset because their pup has crippling hip dysplasia and want to know what you are going to do about it. You have spayed your female so a replacement is out of the question, looks like another refund.

THE SALE

1. You put your ad in the local paper for your pups at the usual price and get only 2 responses and no sales. You cut the pup's price in half and broaden your advertising to 3 other newspapers in which the advertising totals $120.00 a week.
2. You get a few more puppy inquiries from people who ask all about health testing you did before breeding and if the pups are registered. You tell them your dogs are healthy and it was enough and that you could get the papers. The callers politely thank you and hang up.
3. The pups are now 4 months old and getting bigger , eating alot and their barking is really beginning to annoy the neighbors who call the police who inform you of the $150.00 noise by-law.
4. Your neighbors also call the humane society who comes out to inspect the care of your dogs. You pass inspection but end up feeling stressed and harassed.
5. You finally decide to give the rest of the litter away but still have to pay the $1200.00 advertising bill and the $600.00 vet bill.
 

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Thanks for the article. Hope folks will take the time to read and really think about the points that were made. I feel very strongly about this subject.
 

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Thanks for posting this excellent information. I like your provocative "subject line" also... should get a lot of eyes on it.

I'm so passionate about this, as some of you know.
 

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Thanks for this excellent post on the "nuts and bolts" reality of breeding. A must read for anyone even thinking of breeding their Maltese!
 

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Thats some scarey things that could happen...

I would be soo upset if something happened to my (if i had) female.
 

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This is good information anyone who is interested in breeding should be of aware of. I am appreciative of the breeders who have been knowledgable enough and responsible to breed the babies I have, healthy and beautiful. None of which came from a show breeder or puppy mill but rather very good hobby breeders, all of which I am very fond of. We must remember that if it wasn't for good hobby breeders, many of us would not have the dogs that we have. So many show breeders charge outrageous prices that the typical person could not afford, also many that I have talked to sounded like high class puppy mills, who did not talk about their breeders being their loving pets first and were so quickly ready to discard their "bad" breeders to me. My experience with them when looking for me and my mom's 4 dogs in the last two years has tainted my view of them forever. Obviously not everything is as horrible as stated here or dog breeding would not occur. However it is important to be very knowledgeable about the situations that could and often do arise. Also, even the most experienced and knowledgable breeders had to start somewhere, no one started out an expert. And I'm sure even the most experienced people learn new things all the time. I would like to see the good moments of having babies discussed as well, instead of only scare tactics. That would make for a more well rounded discussion. I think the best tactic to use on people who should not be breeding is to remember there is no money in it and if that is the reason you are choosing to breed, you will be sadly mistaken.
 

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I, too, thank you for this wonderful article. Now, on another note, I would like all of you who have your wonderful Maltese to read it again and think of the breeder who strives to have quality dogs for you to purchase. I consider myself a breeder because I will soon be selling pup #7 in three years of breeding.
True, quality pups are easy to place, and we have waiting lists, but there are still many truths in that article about the time, money, and danger to our females. Now only that, but those of us who show have obtained quality dogs, finished championships, and breed very infrequently. We don't do it for the money. In fact, it cost money out of our pocket to be able to do it. Then, we are faced with people who want a pup for almost nothing, want to slander us all over the internet out of ignorance of the situation, and want full registration so that they can start "making some extra money".
 

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Originally posted by chloeandj@Jul 14 2005, 01:17 PM
This is good information anyone who is interested in breeding should be of aware of. I am appreciative of the breeders who have been knowledgable enough and  responsible to breed the babies I have, healthy and beautiful. None of which came from a show breeder or puppy mill but rather very good hobby breeders, all of which I am very fond of. We must remember that if it wasn't for good hobby breeders, many of us would not have the dogs that we have. So many show breeders charge outrageous prices that the typical person could not afford, also many that I have talked to sounded like high class puppy mills, who did not talk about their breeders being their loving pets first and were so quickly ready to discard their "bad" breeders to me. My experience with them when looking for me and my mom's 4 dogs in the last two years has tainted my view of them forever. Obviously not everything is as horrible as stated here or dog breeding would not occur. However it is important to be very knowledgeable about the situations that could and often do arise. Also, even the most experienced and knowledgable breeders had to start somewhere, no one started out an expert. And I'm sure even the most experienced people learn new things all the time. I would like to see the good moments of having babies discussed as well, instead of only scare tactics. That would make for a more well rounded discussion. I think the best tactic to use on people who should not be breeding is to remember there is no money in it and if that is the reason you are choosing to breed, you will be sadly mistaken.
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I think your post was entered as I was writing mine.
Are you a breeder? If so, maybe we can get some of the positive aspects of the situation going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by dhodina+Jul 14 2005, 01:27 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-chloeandj
@Jul 14 2005, 01:17 PM
This is good information anyone who is interested in breeding should be of aware of. I am appreciative of the breeders who have been knowledgable enough and  responsible to breed the babies I have, healthy and beautiful. None of which came from a show breeder or puppy mill but rather very good hobby breeders, all of which I am very fond of. We must remember that if it wasn't for good hobby breeders, many of us would not have the dogs that we have. So many show breeders charge outrageous prices that the typical person could not afford, also many that I have talked to sounded like high class puppy mills, who did not talk about their breeders being their loving pets first and were so quickly ready to discard their "bad" breeders to me. My experience with them when looking for me and my mom's 4 dogs in the last two years has tainted my view of them forever. Obviously not everything is as horrible as stated here or dog breeding would not occur. However it is important to be very knowledgeable about the situations that could and often do arise. Also, even the most experienced and knowledgable breeders had to start somewhere, no one started out an expert. And I'm sure even the most experienced people learn new things all the time. I would like to see the good moments of having babies discussed as well, instead of only scare tactics. That would make for a more well rounded discussion.
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This is reality not a scare tatic.  Anyone who is a high risk pregnancy gets a much worse convo with their dr.  Why?  Because you need to know the what if's and your dr is covering his butt so you can't come back and say I didn't know the risks I was taking.  You seem to want the picture perfect stories to justify having one litter but this is the reality.  Having pups is messy, dirty, your dog may not make it.  The pups may not make it.  There is a high risk involved and not just in birth but in the before and after why wouldn't you want to be aware of the risks?  And this is just a few, the number of things that can and do go wrong is astronomical in any birthing, human, dog anything.  It is not uncommon to lose your bitch and/or the pups. 

Keep in mind this doesn't even mention the other health benefits of a spay.  The risks of losing your greatly increase because of your want to have puppies whatever the reason. Keep in mind this isn't aimed at those who breed to better the breed, showing, testing and matching the best possible dog with the best possible female.

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I completely understand what you are saying and getting across here, I did not mean to offend. This is a very touchy issue. I just didn't want all breeders lumped into byb and puppymills just because they don't show. I respect people that show their dogs, I enjoy going to shows. But I think that GOOD hobby breeders are needed. I guess I went off topic a bit here, as I reread your post, I am not talking about the people who want just one litter. I am talking about the people who make it important to pick quality dogs to breed and ensure a good start for these puppies by early socialization and training before the pup even goes to it's new home. Ensuring that the puppy will be a good pet. And making sure their breeding dogs are part of the family, happy and healthy.
 

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Originally posted by chloeandj@Jul 14 2005, 01:41 PM
I completely understand what you are saying and getting across here, I did not mean to offend. This is a very touchy issue. I just didn't want all breeders lumped into byb and puppymills just because they don't show. Other than my kids my whole world is about my dogs. I respect people that show their dogs, I enjoy going to shows. However I don't believe in it nor am I the type of person that could show. I think that GOOD hobby breeders are needed. I guess I went off topic a bit here, as I reread your post, I am not talking about the people who want just one litter. I am talking about the people who make it important to pick quality dogs to breed and ensure a good start for these puppies by early socialization and training before the pup even goes to it's new home. Ensuring that the puppy will be a good pet. And making sure their breeding dogs are part of the family, happy and healthy.
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I couldn't agree with you more that good hobby breeders are needed; however, I feel they should start with quality dogs. Mine has been a building program, based on having the opportunity to obtain a couple good females with no show restrictions on them, then obtaining males for show. Now, I have girls of my own who will enter the ring, or who can produce quality pups of the caliber I'm proud of. I know what you mean about some of the breeders. Fortunately, I didn't need people like that to obtain what I have. If you keep searching, you will find that there are nice people out there who love their dogs, and who will give you a start.
Not every pup, regardless of the champions in the pedigree should be bred. I think those should be placed in pet homes for a REASONABLE fee, and that is what I am trying to do. So, on one end, I guess four of those six I've placed have been what a good hobby breeder would do.
Now, I'll throw something else in the mix: You mentioned show breeders dumping their bad breeders. A reputable one will sell these on spay/neuter. If they aren't good enough for them to breed, then they shouldn't be bred at all.
There are some who put their "bad" dogs on the newbie who wants to show. Then, they "mentor" them, when, in essence, they are using them to get points on their own dogs. I know of more than one person doing this to new people now, and I think it is disgusting. One poor girl told us of how she was told to care for her dog and get it ready for the ring. It was the exact opposite of what should have been done.
 

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"I couldn't agree with you more that good hobby breeders are needed; however, I feel they should start with quality dogs. "

Right on! Just like building a house, if your foundation isn't strong, it's not going to be a quality house that will last. I think that's the danger in backyard or hobby breeders, no matter how well meaning, that if the breeding stock is second or third generation puppy mill/pet shop dogs, those infamous ticking genetic time bombs will still be there.

As Chloe says, other than her kids, her whole world is her dogs. It can really rock your world when your precious furbaby is diagnosed with a serious medical condition.
 

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I'm not a breeder and don't know anything about breeding. What I do know is that it is a lot of hard work.

With my first puppy I did not get her spayed cuase I did not want to put her through an operation. No one ever explained to me the reasons for it, except not having puppies.

After being educated on this site and seeing the post that Cathers mom put up about the birth of puppies. I would never put Chelsey through that. I just could not do it.

I'm not passing judgment on anyone. This is just my personal feelings for my puppies.
I'm glad that there are good breeders out there our we would not have Chester and Chelsey.

p.s This was very informative. Thanks
 

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Regarding Malts purchased as pets....

As intelligent beings, it seems that if we can almost certainly prevent mammary cancer in our babies by spaying them before their first heat and before two years old for some protection, it seems to be a no-brainer to me that we, as their caretakers should do the right thing by them and have them spayed.

My first Maltese, Rosebud's, mother died of breast cancer at age 5. I am glad Rosebud was spayed or chances are she would have gotten it also.
 

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Thanks for posting this information.

As you can probably guess from my postings on the subject, I also strongly support spay/neutering of all pets. The world is too full of unwanted pets--petfinder has so many wonderful Malts who have been abandoned for one reason or another. Why, just this week we have two members who have actively sought to place their Maltese in other homes.

I recognize, of course, the need for careful breeding programs, and believe that breeding should be left to those with a lifelong commitment to the bettering of the breed (and raise a few select litters, in their homes, while providing the parents and puppies with a loving family life and the highest quality of care).
 

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Originally posted by SylphidesMom@Jul 14 2005, 03:49 PM
Thanks for posting this information.

As you can probably guess from my postings on the subject, I also strongly support spay/neutering of all pets.  The world is too full of unwanted pets--petfinder has so many wonderful Malts who have been abandoned for one reason or another.  Why, just this week we have two members who have actively sought to place their Maltese in other homes.

I recognize, of course, the need for careful breeding programs, and believe that breeding should be left to those with a lifelong commitment to the bettering of the breed (and raise a few select litters, in their homes, while providing the parents and puppies with a loving family life and the highest quality of care).
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I agree 100%
 

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Some of my thoughts on what has just been posted and seriously would like your comments.

#1 In my book, all malts should be treated as pets, whether you breed them or not.

#2 People can talk about rescuing a malt, however very few are eligible to receive one or should adopt one

#3 I would like to know why many retired breeding malts and retired show dogs end up in rescue

#4 Why do we talk down about breeders, yet we don't adopt a homeless pet of a mixed breed?
 

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Originally posted by Kallie/Catcher's Mom@Jul 14 2005, 04:37 PM
Regarding Malts purchased as pets....

As intelligent beings, it seems that if we can almost certainly prevent mammary cancer in our babies by spaying them before their first heat and before two years old for some protection, it seems to be a no-brainer to me that we, as their caretakers should do the right thing by them and have them spayed.

My first Maltese, Rosebud's, mother died of breast cancer at age 5. I am glad Rosebud was spayed or chances are she would have gotten it also.
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If the Vet I took missy to even mentioned to me about cancer i would have spayed her.
They never educated me.. only warned me about her having litters and I knew that she would be with me no matter were we went . Back then internet just started so resorces for information was low.

Even our vet now never mentioned lowering chances of cancer to us... i just know to spayed her because of information provided here.
 

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Originally posted by chloeandj@Jul 14 2005, 04:06 PM
Some of my thoughts on what has just been posted and seriously would like your comments.

#1 In my book, all malts should be treated as pets, whether you breed them or not.

#2 People can talk about rescuing a malt, however very few are eligible to receive one or should adopt one

#3 I would like to know why many retired breeding malts and retired show dogs end up in rescue

#4 Why do we talk down about breeders, yet we don't adopt a homeless pet of a mixed breed?
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I would like to add #5

#5. Every breeder should be responsible for giving a portion of their sales to rescue and/or working actively with rescue, including doing fosters and adoptions.
 
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