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I have been sitting here at work the last few weeks thinking about getting my masters. I have a B.S. degree in Computer Science, minor in Business. I have been working at my job now for almost 1yr... i test software. I dunno if i can do this the rest of my life. I choose a computer major because i didnt know any better and i think in my opinion i was tooo young to decide what type of job i wanted to do. I'm having such mixed feelings now.... since i was small i always wanted to be a Veterinarian. Ever since my 1st pet (I was about 8yrs old or so) (it was a rabbit because my mom wouldnt let me get a dog) got sick one day and was just laying there. I hated not knowing what was wrong... i felt helpless. From that minute i always told everyone i wanted to be a Veterinarian. I then went to high school and slacked off. I got mostly C's and B's. I didnt even take any hard science classes because i didnt wanna try or fail them. I took a lot math though because i was good in it. I then went to college near my house and just took computer classes because i found then interesting. I thought being a Veterinarian would be too hard for me. Anyway... Lately i feel like i regret not following through with what i wanted to do orginially and that was to be a Veterinarian. I looked online at colleges that offer Veterinarian degrees and i was curious about a few things... What is the difference between a D.M.V. and a V.M.D.?? I always thought a D.M.V. was better?!
I also read about the programs and how to get accepted. You need 5-6 different core classes from another college (cal, biology, etc.). I was wondering what is involved with Physics? I was just curious if those future Veterinarians on here have any opinions of the classes... other than you really have to study. I was also looking at colleges that are around my area.... there is not a big selection. I was wondering if anyone knows any information on these colleges Ross University school of veterinary medicine (i saw somewhere its in NY but the address is edision, NJ??? why?), Pennsylvania State University Department of Veterinary Science, University of Pennsylvania. I know that Cornell is the best... but thats soo far from here in NJ...
Anyway... any info would be great. i'm just brain storming here....

ohh.. and could those going to school still... explain the process you went through for school.... like residencies and in what order you completed things.
 

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I don't know anything about becoming a vet!! HAHA BUT I just want to say, go for it! There is no better time to do it!


I too have been strugling with what I want to do with my life. I have a BA in Public Relations and right now I am not happy with my career choice. There are so many things I would rather be doing. I know I threw out one idea on the boards, but another option I was thinking about was interior design. I had always wanted to do it, but my confidence is just not high when it comes to education. I know from college that I can get good grades if I really put my mind to it, so I really don't know what's holding me back.

I have spent about 6 hours this week looking up scholarships for women who want to go back to school!

Good luck!
 

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I really don't know anything about vet schools. Lady Montava (spelling ?) can tell you all about that. I can tell you about my path, which was medical school. I decided in high school that I wanted to be a doctor (mostly cause my cousin was doing that and everyone was in awe of him). I always studied hard but at that point I didn't know how to study effectively. I knew that med school was going to be competitive, so I had to go to a good undergrad college. After undergraduate, I didn't quite feel that my application would be the best yet, so I took a year off and did AmeriCorps (which is a volunteering organization thing). So then I went to med shool and as I was approaching the end, I realized that I needed to make my application more competitive. So once again I took a year off (this year) and I am doing research which helps a LOT in getting a residency. Getting a residency varies on what you want to do. Things like dermatology and radiology are extremely competitive while internal medicine is much less harder to get into. Again, I don't know how all this works with vet school, but I think its somewhat similar. I think its important to enjoy what you are doing in life and its never too late to go back to school.

Overall, U of Pennsylvania is an excellent school for both undergraduate and medical school.
 

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Kodie, I don't know anything about what it takes to become a vet, but I do know that I am in the same situation as you are right now when it comes to careers. I think we're the same age (24) and now is the time to do it!!! We are young enough that it should be really easy for us to get back into school and ask our parents for help with money if we need to
My bf just bought me some career test type books to read, but since you already have the vet idea, maybe you could take a side job or volunteer at a vet's office to check it out to see if it's really for you before you make the full commitment. Of course, I'm not one to give advice about career's because after college (BS in Business mgmt, and minor in psych) I went back for a certificate in pharmacy just to see what it's like before I made the full commitment. I'm thinking it's not totally for me, so now I'm trying to figure out what I REALLY do want to do with my life.

This sounds really terrible to say, but I'm glad I'm not the only one with this problem right now. Come on Natalie and Kodie!!!! We can do it!!!
 

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Originally posted by littlepeanut@Apr 8 2005, 03:29 PM
This sounds really terrible to say, but I'm glad I'm not the only one with this problem right now. 
 

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haha, I'm right there with ya!
 

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Originally posted by Kodie@Apr 8 2005, 03:10 PM
I looked online at colleges that offer Veterinarian degrees and i was curious about a few things...  What is the difference between a D.M.V. and a V.M.D.??  I always thought a D.M.V. was better?! 
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All the vets in my town are DVM. That is the designation I've seen most often.

If I were you I would work in a veterinary office for a year or so first. That way you will see exactly what it is like to be a vet and see if you will like it. You will gain some valuable experience, knowledge and perhaps a mentor. The salary will likely be less than you're making now but I believe you still live at home.. right? So, this is the perfect time to give it a try.

I have heard that it is extraordinarily competitive to get in to vet school... that only the best and brightest are accepted due to there being so many applications for the available spots.

By getting a little experience under your belt, it might help in that regard. And references from the vets you worked for could be helpful as well......
 

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I have been thinking about going back to school too but I am all over the broad. I have an engineering degree and I am working as a Management Consulting for a large firm. I don't even know what I do all day but I know I haven't slept in two days because of the work load. My breaks is posting on this board.

I work till 7 and I head home and work there with my furkids. I am glad they are all calm babies. They sit there and watch me work.

I have been thinking about going back to school to do my MBA or go and become a lawyer or a veternarian. I don't know where my passion and heart is. I need to be constantly challenged and get bored quickly. In my current job, I am challenged all the time and the projects are always different. But sometimes I want some time to myself.

Let me know how your search for a school goes.
 

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You "youngsters" are at a good age to make a change. Just realize that when you hit your mid-late 30's you may want to change again!! I commend you for knowing that what you are doing will "not carry you through" your entire lifetime. I always told my boys to "find what stimulates your heart and not your wallet". I was an RN for years and just ended up so stressed and unhappy that I got out while I still had compassion for people. I tried many different job paths and finally ended up happier than I have ever been in my life, I don't make a ton of money, but when I go home at night, I feel good about what I did and what I'll do tomorrow. FIND YOUR BLISS!! Good luck to you all that are contemplating a change in your life.....just remember...

The Way Life Should Be...

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming....

"WOW!! WHAT A RIDE!!"
 

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I don't know very much about this, but I do know a little. First, I can tell you that there is no vet school in NJ. The University of Penn in Philly has a top notch school. But vet schools are small. There are not many applicants each year, and NJ has "slots" at some of the other state schools meaning that those schools have to take a certain number of students from NJ. Rutgers University/Cook College in New Brunswick has a mamal research program, but does not offer a vet program. I have heard that most of the applicants at vet schools are women. There are very few men entering the field. Most programs have one slot for every two to three applications. That's a much better ratio than say law school. I would recommend that you possibly speak to some of the specialists that Kodie has seen...at Cornell and other places. They would be the best to give you a realistic opinion. Good luck in whatever you decide.
 

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Here is a good overview of what is required for being a veterinarian. This is from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville Web site: UTK Vet School - What is a Veterinarian There are some good contacts at the end of the article.

WHAT IS A VETERINARIAN?

According to the AVMA (please see their weblink at (http://www.avma.org/communications/brochur...inarian_faq.asp ), today's veterinarians are extremely dedicated and willing to work long, difficult hours to save the life of an animal or help solve a public health crisis. Among the personal attributes that contribute to a successful career in veterinary medicine are:

A scientific mind — Individuals who are interested in veterinary medicine should have an inquiring mind and keen powers of observation. Aptitude and interest in the biological sciences are important. Veterinarians must maintain a lifelong interest in scientific learning, and must genuinely like and understand animals.

Good communication skills — Veterinarians should be able to meet, talk, and work well with a variety of people. Compassion is an essential attribute for success, especially for veterinarians working with pet owners who form strong bonds with their pets.

Management experience — Many work environments (e.g., private or corporate clinical practice, governmental agencies, public health programs) require that veterinarians manage other employees. Basic managerial and leadership skills training make these positions much more rewarding.

Education — Students interested in a career in veterinary medicine should perform well in general science and biology in junior high school and pursue a strong science, math, and biology program in high school. Before applying to veterinary college/school, students must successfully complete preveterinary undergraduate course work. Each college/school of veterinary medicine establishes its own preveterinary requirements, but typically these include demonstrating basic language and communication skills, and completion of courses in the social sciences, humanities, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.

Admission to veterinary school is highly competitive with the number of qualified applicants admitted to veterinary schools varying from year to year. Applicants may be required to take a standardized test (for example, the Graduate Record Examination). There are presently 28 AVMA-accredited colleges/schools of veterinary medicine in the United States, four in Canada, and six in other countries. Each school is regularly evaluated by the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association and must maintain the quality of its program to remain accredited.

Most veterinary schools require applicants to submit applications through the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS). For information about VMCAS, application requirements, applicant data statistics and other admission resources, visit http://www.aavmc.org/vmcas/vmcas.htm.

After completing the required veterinary medical curriculum (usually over a period of four years), many graduates choose to pursue additional education in one of 20 AVMA-recognized veterinary specialties (surgery, internal medicine, animal behavior, dentistry, ophthalmology, pathology, laboratory animal medicine, preventive medicine, etc.).

For More Information contact the American Veterinary Medical Association

The AVMA Web site, www.avma.org, includes a list of all U.S. veterinary colleges/schools, AVMA-recognized veterinary specialty organizations, and additional resources for more information.

The AVMA has produced a video and a CD-ROM, Veterinary Medicine—Dedicated to Service, which profiles veterinarians engaged in a variety of professional activities in different parts of the United States. For more information, call the AVMA Communications Division at 847/248-2862, ext. 6617.
 

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I say go for it. I will be 40 this year and I neve finished my college degree. Didn't know what I wanted to be or do. I am now back in college and working fulltime...sometimes I wonder what I have done to myself. It helps that I have all the core classes done. I am still trying to figure out how I am going to take my college career but at least I am doing it. So go for it before you are my age (old) and feel just like you do now.
 

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Wow! K/C's mom, it really seems like I fit that profile for a vet!! Too bad I'm allergic to most animals
I wish you well in whatever you decide Kodie!!! It sounds like there are lots of people here who are in this same boat! You'll never know unless you try!!!! Meanwhile, my mom calls me a jack of all trades and master of NONE! Ha, she's sick of me already


Lacey's mom, you're NOT old!!!!!

I'm gonna have to print out that quote from Sisse's mom and tape it to my forehead!!!
 

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i have NO clue about most of the stuff:

but i've decided just recently that i wanted to be a vet and i'm 23 yrs old. i've just been taking biology, chemistry, and calculus so far. im going to start physics in the fall.
UC Davis wants people to take the calculus based physics...but other schools dont mind if you take the trignometry basied physics. but i heard that the calculus stuff isnt that bad. and i've heard that the physics is hard.

uc davis wants a minimum of 180 hours of work experience (that you worked in a vets office) but the average student has 2500 hours. :new_Eyecrazy:

i basically searched 'ask jeeves' for a few of the questions i had.

and then i PMed ladymontava asking her specifics...like if she's ever had to put an animal to sleep and how she felt about it.

ladymontava is almost done with vet school.
so she knows A LOT!!
 

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Originally posted by CharmyPoo@Apr 8 2005, 01:51 PM
I work till 7 and I head home and work there with my furkids.  I am glad they are all calm babies.  They sit there and watch me work.
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Unfortunately, my baby always hast to sit and watch me work or study. I walk him 2x/day for about ~30 min but I spend a lot of my time studying. I feel awful about it. But I play with him as much as I can but I just always think its not enough.
 

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Vets are DVM... Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.

DMV stands for Department of Motor Vehicles, as in, where you get your driver's license from. :lol:
 

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Way back when when I was an undergrad I had the goal of being a Vet. I was working toward that when I took organic chem not once not twice but three times to pass. That was the wake up call for me. Being a vet is alot of education and time. Its is an extremely big commitment. I decided that I just wasn't ready to make that back then and switched my BS to Actuarial Science. I finished my mba 3 years ago and still don't know what I really want to do. I saw a stat. once that something like 83% of people work outside their area of study. I know it rings true for me I am now the director of supplier diversity for a large medical supply company. I have thought time and time again of going back but it is such a large commitment I just haven't done it. I don't know if this helps anyone but I figured I would throw my 2 cents in.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Originally posted by stini@Apr 8 2005, 05:06 PM
Vets are DVM... Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.

DMV stands for Department of Motor Vehicles, as in, where you get your driver's license from.  :lol:
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oops... just goes to show you... i dont know much about the difference D.V.M. or V.M.D.
 
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