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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! My husband and I feel ready to adopt another Maltese after losing both of our boys in the last 6 months. I have done quite a bit of research and used recommendations found here. Earlier this week I sent emails to several reputable breeders but have not yet received any responses. Am I being too impatient? We are being really cautious with who we go with because Kip (our Maltese) had health issues that took away some of his quality of life. We don’t want another pup - or us - to go through that again. How long does it usually take for a breeder to respond? Thank you in advance - we just really miss our fur babies!
 

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Has anyone here heard of Luvshire Maltese? They are a breeder in Pennsylvania. Any information or recommendations would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.
 

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i would suggest calling the Maltese breeders and speak with them over the phone if your emails have no response and you find that breeder worthy. The most time I would give a breeder is a week to respond to the email.
 

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Hi everyone! My husband and I feel ready to adopt another Maltese after losing both of our boys in the last 6 months. I have done quite a bit of research and used recommendations found here. Earlier this week I sent emails to several reputable breeders but have not yet received any responses. Am I being too impatient? We are being really cautious with who we go with because Kip (our Maltese) had health issues that took away some of his quality of life. We don’t want another pup - or us - to go through that again. How long does it usually take for a breeder to respond? Thank you in advance - we just really miss our fur babies!
I do not know the answer to the question you asked, but would think it just varies. When I wanted the Maltese which I acquired, I searched for Maltese breeders who were looking to rehome one of their breeding dogs, and found one who happened to be looking right at the time I wrote to her. I've added much more than you asked, simply because of my concerns about these wonderful dogs and the issues they have.
I've been doing a little research, because I loved the Maltese I had put down just this month. When she had tracheal collapse I had a specialist insert the metal mesh stent. (Have not submitted to insurance yet, but won't be surprised if not covered; cost a bit over $5000.) The specialist admitted, that the stent ended up 1/2 inch shorter than expected; it simply widened more than expected. This vet said it was first she'd seen this issue, in ten years of doing these.
The final issues were seizures which we think were due to brain tumor.
These are only 2 out of a list of 7 genetic issues to which this breed is prone to having.
It is so heartbreaking that these dogs are being bred with these health issues. However, some breeders are checking DNA markers for some of the Maltese genetic disorders. I did not see any information that they are checking for tracheal collapse, but for some other markers they are.
My Maltese had a cancerous tumor in the abdomen area, which was successfully removed several years before the seizures began. There is another genetic prone issue they have which is also related to a tumor, so I don't know for sure what the whole story was for my Maltese.
If I have another, I think I would get on a waiting list for a breeder who discloses that they do check the DNA. I saw some in a "reputable breeders" list which disclosed this. One reason I would do this, is because of what Dr. Becker (youtube) has shared about health issues in dogs who are spayed or neutered before they are about 5 or 6 years old. If you have not seen that video, you should.
In addition, I would include whatever supplement would strengthen cartilage to help prevent tracheal collapse, and if there was an indication of collapse, I'd have stent inserted early, if a holistic vet, such as Dr. Becker, supported that. I know the vets like to start with medications first, but I'm not a big supporter of drug type treatments, if they can be avoided.
Also, I'd use the diet closest to a ketogenic diet, and add regularly CBD oil (again, checking for best one).
In the last several months, I cooked grass fed beef for my dog, and ground in a baby food grinder, into a pate, with a little grass fed beef bone broth, as she had very few teeth. She loved green beans and I gave those to her just about every day. She also liked cauliflower, which is good because of its anticarcinogenic properties, etc.
My Maltese girl was just short one month of being 15 years old when I had to let her go. I acquired her when she was just a little over 6 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I do not know the answer to the question you asked, but would think it just varies. When I wanted the Maltese which I acquired, I searched for Maltese breeders who were looking to rehome one of their breeding dogs, and found one who happened to be looking right at the time I wrote to her. I've added much more than you asked, simply because of my concerns about these wonderful dogs and the issues they have.
I've been doing a little research, because I loved the Maltese I had put down just this month. When she had tracheal collapse I had a specialist insert the metal mesh stent. (Have not submitted to insurance yet, but won't be surprised if not covered; cost a bit over $5000.) The specialist admitted, that the stent ended up 1/2 inch shorter than expected; it simply widened more than expected. This vet said it was first she'd seen this issue, in ten years of doing these.
The final issues were seizures which we think were due to brain tumor.
These are only 2 out of a list of 7 genetic issues to which this breed is prone to having.
It is so heartbreaking that these dogs are being bred with these health issues. However, some breeders are checking DNA markers for some of the Maltese genetic disorders. I did not see any information that they are checking for tracheal collapse, but for some other markers they are.
My Maltese had a cancerous tumor in the abdomen area, which was successfully removed several years before the seizures began. There is another genetic prone issue they have which is also related to a tumor, so I don't know for sure what the whole story was for my Maltese.
If I have another, I think I would get on a waiting list for a breeder who discloses that they do check the DNA. I saw some in a "reputable breeders" list which disclosed this. One reason I would do this, is because of what Dr. Becker (youtube) has shared about health issues in dogs who are spayed or neutered before they are about 5 or 6 years old. If you have not seen that video, you should.
In addition, I would include whatever supplement would strengthen cartilage to help prevent tracheal collapse, and if there was an indication of collapse, I'd have stent inserted early, if a holistic vet, such as Dr. Becker, supported that. I know the vets like to start with medications first, but I'm not a big supporter of drug type treatments, if they can be avoided.
Also, I'd use the diet closest to a ketogenic diet, and add regularly CBD oil (again, checking for best one).
In the last several months, I cooked grass fed beef for my dog, and ground in a baby food grinder, into a pate, with a little grass fed beef bone broth, as she had very few teeth. She loved green beans and I gave those to her just about every day. She also liked cauliflower, which is good because of its anticarcinogenic properties, etc.
My Maltese girl was just short one month of being 15 years old when I had to let her go. I acquired her when she was just a little over 6 years old.
Thanks for the information. I can’t tell you how many breeders I have contacted in the last month, I have called and emailed and have received only 3 replies, one who had a puppy, but never responded when asked for photos and more information. Of the other two who replied, one started pricing at 6 thousand and the other at 4 thousand, but had no pups until next year. I am contacting reputable breeders, most who do Genetic testing and offer a guarantee.

Our little Kip was purchased at a pet store, was beautiful and had a wonderful temperament and personality. He suffered from bladder stones, resulting in 4 surgeries. At 15 yrs. 8 months he was still energetic and puppy-like. One night he had a seizure and was limp as a rag doll. I rushed him to the emergency room where he woke briefly before they took him from me. ( I was not allowed in due to covid). When the doctor called with results, she told me it wasn’t going to be what I wanted to hear - he had a large amount of fluid around his heart and the medications were not stopping his seizures. To her credit, she had me pull around to the back and they escorted me into a room to be with him as he passed. Our regular vet called us as soon as she found out and explained that she thought it was a brain tumor. Sadly, we lost our Papillon in October, only 6 months after Kip. It is just so disappointing hearing so many people getting a pet and we are having little luck getting a reply. Guess we will try not to think about it - maybe someone will get back to us eventually.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i would suggest calling the Maltese breeders and speak with them over the phone if your emails have no response and you find that breeder worthy. The most time I would give a breeder is a week to respond to the email.
Thanks for the reply. I have called and only one responded. We talked, but she won’t have a litter until sometime next year; we are on her wait list. One breeder emailed that she had a male available and I immediately contacted her requesting photos and more information, no response, even after a second attempt. At this point I think we are going to take a break from searching. Perhaps my emotions are too high due to this pandemic. We recently retired and have had tremendous loss in the last two years (my father had ALS) - our little Kip was my comfort - he always knew when I was down. Maybe we’ll start our search again after the holidays.
 

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Thanks for the reply. I have called and only one responded. We talked, but she won’t have a litter until sometime next year; we are on her wait list. One breeder emailed that she had a male available and I immediately contacted her requesting photos and more information, no response, even after a second attempt. At this point I think we are going to take a break from searching. Perhaps my emotions are too high due to this pandemic. We recently retired and have had tremendous loss in the last two years (my father had ALS) - our little Kip was my comfort - he always knew when I was down. Maybe we’ll start our search again after the holidays.
Sorry for your loss, the pandemic has put a spike on puppy buyers you should use the search engine Akc marketplace.com and puppyfind.com they both can be useful when looking for a Maltese breeder.
 

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Sorry for your loss, the pandemic has put a spike on puppy buyers you should use the search engine Akc marketplace.com and puppyfind.com they both can be useful when looking for a Maltese breeder.
Thanks so much. I contacted a number of breeders on AKC marketplace - two breeders contacted me - one has puppies but is way above our price range, the other won’t have any until summer. No response from the others. I will probably resume searching after the holidays.
 

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Of the other two who replied, one started pricing at 6 thousand and the other at 4 thousand, but had no pups until next year. I am contacting reputable breeders, most who do Genetic testing and offer a guarantee.
I'm sorry, but starting at $6,000 is absolutely unacceptable, imho. The same thing is happening in the poodle breed, apparently--prices doubled overnight due to Covid.

I also find it unacceptable to not respond to all serious inquiries. For heaven's sake, give the courtesy of a reply. Most people who inquire have lost a dog and are grieving. It doesn't mean you have to sell to anyone who isn't the right fit, but just be kind and reply.
 

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I'm sorry, but starting at $6,000 is absolutely unacceptable, imho. The same thing is happening in the poodle breed, apparently--prices doubled overnight due to Covid.

I also find it unacceptable to not respond to all serious inquiries. For heaven's sake, give the courtesy of a reply. Most people who inquire have lost a dog and are grieving. It doesn't mean you have to sell to anyone who isn't the right fit, but just be kind and reply.
We were a bit surprised at the prices too, but more shocked at the lack of response.

Yesterday I received a reply from a breeder in Bear, Delaware I found on the AKC Marketplace. We have a phone call scheduled for Sunday, but have not yet discussed price. She offers a health guarantee and will kennel your pet or pets purchased from her free if you need. They are located only about an hour away from us. I searched to see if there were any complaints, but did not find anything. I hope it works out.
 

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I’m sorry your having such a hard time finding a puppy to love. This was exactly why and how I went out of the country for my 2 youngest. I thought it was too good to be true to adopt beautiful puppies with full body X-rays, all bloodwork and still a relationship to this day with my breeder in Korea. She was responsive, sent tons of pictures, videos, whereas I felt if you even so much asked for a picture of the puppy here in the states, the breeder took offense. Imo, that’s bulls*#*, if we are paying a lot of money, we have every right to ask.
As a matter of fact, the Korean dogs were not that much more, actually a lot less if your getting prices at $6000 here, which is ridiculous, again imo.
Im waiting for the day, the buyer inventory paying big bucks dries up, and then maybe some of these breeders will think twice about being rude. They wonder why people resort to buying from out of the country or sadly unethical breeders, not that that is the right thing and actually, IMO the worse thing one can do, but that’s a whole other issue.
Anyway...best of luck in your search!
 

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I’m sorry your having such a hard time finding a puppy to love. This was exactly why and how I went out of the country for my 2 youngest. I thought it was too good to be true. Beautiful puppies, full body X-rays, all bloodwork and still a relationship to this day with my breeder in Korea. She was responsive, sent tons of pictures, videos, whereas I felt if you even so much asked for a picture of the puppy here in the states, the breeder took offense. Imo, that’s bulls*#*, if we are paying a lot of money, we have every right to ask.
As a matter of fact, the Korean dogs were not that much more, actually a lot less if your getting prices at $6000 here, which is ridiculous, again imo.
Im waiting for the day, the buyer inventory paying big bucks dries up, and then maybe some of these breeders will think twice about being rude.
Anyway...best of luck in your search!
Your puppy is so cute! Thank you -I understand that there are expenses for breeders, but the vast majority of us are not wealthy. I’m hoping we have luck with the person who replied yesterday. Fingers crossed!
 

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We were a bit surprised at the prices too, but more shocked at the lack of response.

Yesterday I received a reply from a breeder in Bear, Delaware I found on the AKC Marketplace. We have a phone call scheduled for Sunday, but have not yet discussed price. She offers a health guarantee and will kennel your pet or pets purchased from her free if you need. They are located only about an hour away from us. I searched to see if there were any complaints, but did not find anything. I hope it works out.
Being on the AKC Marketplace isn't a guarantee that you're working with a truly responsible breeder - one who is working on bettering the breed, adheres to breed standards, and shows her dogs in confirmation as a means of measuring that. Anyone can register an AKC dog and be on the marketplace so make sure this breeder is actively showing and/or is being mentored by someone who is actively showing. That way you know you're getting a dog bred by someone who knows what they're doing, not someone who is what we call a "backyard breeder." Good luck with your search!
 

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Being on the AKC Marketplace isn't a guarantee that you're working with a truly responsible breeder - one who is working on bettering the breed, adheres to breed standards, and shows her dogs in confirmation as a means of measuring that. Anyone can register an AKC dog and be on the marketplace so make sure this breeder is actively showing and/or is being mentored by someone who is actively showing. That way you know you're getting a dog bred by someone who knows what they're doing, not someone who is what we call a "backyard breeder." Good luck with your search!
This is so true what Maggie has to say. Also, I would not depend too highly on any health guarantees unless they are from a reputable breeder. The BYB are famous for not taking responsibility if something goes wrong.
 
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