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My sweet Brody died last year May (only 5.5 years young) and i was told that last litter using his father had recently completed and i could have his two younger half brothers, which became Cody and Cooper whom arrived last August and have been not twice as much work, more like 10x the worl, versus having one, but i am in love with them so too me they can do now wrong (or at least i make excuses to others we share our home with versus making them out to be bad or misbehaved)....My question or comments are this; when i first got them and throughout majority of this first year, i would say they are “good” using wee wee pads, not horrible and nowhere near perfect. However, in past few weeks, I’ve noticed this has changed to their being below average using them and get this, in place of the pads, they have been using our carpets (nothing novel there), but what has me perplexed is two fold-first off, they will pee right in front of me on floor anywhere they choose, towels, carpet, etc anywhere. Secondly and most perplexing is how they have turned my couch into a wee wee pad. These past ten days or so, they use my couch to relieve themselves more than anything else. can someone enlighten me on why this may be happening? Like what could have potentially changed so drastically? Any/all comments much appreciated.
Regards,
Matthew (NYC)
 

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Welcome!
I hope someone can offer you some advice, other than what I can offer, because I have never had a problem with potty training, so not sure my advice is the right way to go.
I personally would go back to the beginning, whether it was crate training or in a pen, until they understand what you expect out of them. I certainly wouldn’t be given them free reign of the house until they can be trusted not to have accidents.
I would also rule out a medical condition but from the sounds of it, both are acting out, so I highly doubt it’s medically related. Sounds like they lack training and maybe confused as to what is expected of them and where they are supposed to go potty.
 

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I agree with Joanne (Maddysmom). First get them checked out at the vet and make sure they don't have a medical condition. Then its back to square one with potty training. They should NOT have full run of the house until they are potty trained. They should be in a crate or expen and only have access to a confined area of the house AFTER they have peed/pooped. They must be watched carefully. Also, you must thoroughly clean all read where they have peed. Dogs have a wonderful sense of smell and will go back to areas previously peed on. Right now your house is one bug pee pad and this is not acceptable.

I have added a section below from the American Maltese Association on crate training:
Crate Training - What it's all about!
Most experienced dog people are advocates of crate training - a method of dog management which involves keeping the dog confined in a crate. Crating is especially appropriate for Maltese because they are small; they take well to crating and thus can avoid many risks.

Crating aids in housetraining. The fact that dogs are disinclined to relieve themselves where they have to sleep is an important factor in teaching toilet habits. A Maltese over 6 months old can usually "hold it" 8 hours is kept quiet in a crate while his owner is working or sleeping.

The owner of a crated Maltese never comes home to a potty mess on the rug, chewed electric cords or unraveled toilet paper! A crated Maltese is safer from burglars, service people, other dogs and visiting children. When the crated Maltese goes away from home, he's less likely to pick up germs or become lost, stolen, or hurt. Hotels are more likely to accept a dog they know will be confined to a crate.

When a Maltese is used to a crate, confinement at a veterinary hospital is not so bad. Likewise, the crate-trained Maltese is not overly stressed when he has to be confined for unusual situations like traveling, moving, boarding, when a female is in heat, or recuperation from an illness.

An investment in a crate is small compared to cleaning or replacing carpet or vet. bills for a broken leg. A crate or exercise pen approx. 2' x 3' is a good size to consider especially if the dog will be confined for several hours. For short term or for traveling, a lightweight Vari-Kennel #100 or #200 is a good choice. All things considered, a Maltese in a crate is a safe, not sorry, sight.
 

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I agree with Joanne (Maddysmom). First get them checked out at the vet and make sure they don't have a medical condition. Then its back to square one with potty training. They should NOT have full run of the house until they are potty trained. They should be in a crate or expen and only have access to a confined area of the house AFTER they have peed/pooped. They must be watched carefully. Also, you must thoroughly clean all read where they have peed. Dogs have a wonderful sense of smell and will go back to areas previously peed on. Right now your house is one bug pee pad and this is not acceptable.

I have added a section below from the American Maltese Association on crate training:
Crate Training - What it's all about!
Most experienced dog people are advocates of crate training - a method of dog management which involves keeping the dog confined in a crate. Crating is especially appropriate for Maltese because they are small; they take well to crating and thus can avoid many risks.

Crating aids in housetraining. The fact that dogs are disinclined to relieve themselves where they have to sleep is an important factor in teaching toilet habits. A Maltese over 6 months old can usually "hold it" 8 hours is kept quiet in a crate while his owner is working or sleeping.

The owner of a crated Maltese never comes home to a potty mess on the rug, chewed electric cords or unraveled toilet paper! A crated Maltese is safer from burglars, service people, other dogs and visiting children. When the crated Maltese goes away from home, he's less likely to pick up germs or become lost, stolen, or hurt. Hotels are more likely to accept a dog they know will be confined to a crate.

When a Maltese is used to a crate, confinement at a veterinary hospital is not so bad. Likewise, the crate-trained Maltese is not overly stressed when he has to be confined for unusual situations like traveling, moving, boarding, when a female is in heat, or recuperation from an illness.

An investment in a crate is small compared to cleaning or replacing carpet or vet. bills for a broken leg. A crate or exercise pen approx. 2' x 3' is a good size to consider especially if the dog will be confined for several hours. For short term or for traveling, a lightweight Vari-Kennel #100 or #200 is a good choice. All things considered, a Maltese in a crate is a safe, not sorry, sight.
Thank you guys so much for being so gracious and spending the time to help make me understand what things i can try and help both me and boy boys out. It’s truly a partnership with doggies, specifically pups and i take as much blane in the matter as i would give to them. If i haven’t shown them properly, how in world can i expect them to just know. It’s unreasonable at that. Quick question though, you both mentioned medical conditions, but didn’t elaborate much on it. What potential medical conditions) would be tied to something like I’ve highlighted in the start of this discussion? Any/all responses, greatly appreciated.

regards,
Matthew
 

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Thank you guys so much for being so gracious and spending the time to help make me understand what things i can try and help both me and boy boys out. It’s truly a partnership with doggies, specifically pups and i take as much blane in the matter as i would give to them. If i haven’t shown them properly, how in world can i expect them to just know. It’s unreasonable at that. Quick question though, you both mentioned medical conditions, but didn’t elaborate much on it. What potential medical conditions) would be tied to something like I’ve highlighted in the start of this discussion? Any/all responses, greatly appreciated.

regards,
Matthew
The medical condition the others mentioned is possibly a urinary tract infection. Anytime a dog is peeing in places they don't normally go, the first thing you should do is rule out an UTI. Another small possibility is bladder stones. I assume they have been neutered???? If they haven't, then there is a very good chance that could be the problem.
 

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My sweet Brody died last year May (only 5.5 years young) and i was told that last litter using his father had recently completed and i could have his two younger half brothers, which became Cody and Cooper whom arrived last August and have been not twice as much work, more like 10x the worl, versus having one, but i am in love with them so too me they can do now wrong (or at least i make excuses to others we share our home with versus making them out to be bad or misbehaved)....My question or comments are this; when i first got them and throughout majority of this first year, i would say they are “good” using wee wee pads, not horrible and nowhere near perfect. However, in past few weeks, I’ve noticed this has changed to their being below average using them and get this, in place of the pads, they have been using our carpets (nothing novel there), but what has me perplexed is two fold-first off, they will pee right in front of me on floor anywhere they choose, towels, carpet, etc anywhere. Secondly and most perplexing is how they have turned my couch into a wee wee pad. These past ten days or so, they use my couch to relieve themselves more than anything else. can someone enlighten me on why this may be happening? Like what could have potentially changed so drastically? Any/all comments much appreciated.
Regards,
Matthew (NYC)
Gee...I'd suggest speaking to your vet. Their might be a physical reason. Other than that, I'd go back to toilet training 101, which is crate training and keeping them on a schedule. I do hope that helps!

And so sorry about your loss of a young dog last year. That is so sad.

Lainie
 
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