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the rabies shot should be given separately and at least 3 weeks from any other vaccinations. also, many states have a 3 year rabies policy, so you may not even need to repeat it this year depending on your location. instead of vaccinating for distemper and parvo, you can do a blood titer test for them to see if aolani is still immune. hth
 

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I live overseas and haven't yet vaccinated Kitzel for Rabies---so he can't fly internationally until he gets it (he will be 5 months next week & has all other puppy shots). Since it is required by law I have to have it. We do not have rabies in Greece. Is it possible to ask the vet to give him only part of the innoculation. He had a severe reaction to advantix recently and I am concerned about the Rabies shot. He weighs around 4 pounds (almost) and I am waiting to get his weight up. He has to have the innoculation 30 days before he can fly and I never know when that will be. Please advise on the partial dose.
Thanks Dr. J---your advice is respected.
 

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the rabies shot should be given separately and at least 3 weeks from any other vaccinations. also, many states have a 3 year rabies policy, so you may not even need to repeat it this year depending on your location. instead of vaccinating for distemper and parvo, you can do a blood titer test for them to see if aolani is still immune. hth

Thank you so much. I will def follow this advice when we go in for our annual in August.
 

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Most vets won't give a partial dose. Good luck on finding one that will agree to it.

No vet has ever explained to my satisfaction why the same exact amount of vaccine is given to a Maltese and a Great Dane. No vet ever mentions or discusses the additives/preservatives in the vaccination shots, and whether they might be harmful, especially to tiny dogs. No vet has ever mentioned to me that the vaccine precautions on the packaging state that they should be given only to healthy dogs.

Unless your dog is in a high-risk situation, think twice about automatically vaccinating. Each dog is different, with different lifestyles, and they should not be treated all the same. Veterinary offices should not intimidate anyone into vaccinating their dog. You do have a choice.
 

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whole dog journal has an excellent article on vaccines this month, including information on how to discuss the topic with your vet and not get "intimidated" into over-vaccinating.
 

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whole dog journal has an excellent article on vaccines this month, including information on how to discuss the topic with your vet and not get "intimidated" into over-vaccinating.
I'll make sure my ex gets to see that cuz he gets bamboozled by his vet all the time.
 

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Harry does not get any vaccines due to his impaired immune system.
I have a letter from my vet that the town accepts. Of course,
since Harry is unable to ward off disease, he doesn't go to
any public places where other dogs might be and he cannot
travel.

My vet suggested titer testing for my other little guys. I will titer test
this year instead of vaccinating. I also no longer get the lyme disease
vaccine for any of my dogs. A golden we had for many years :wub: got
lyme disease even after having the series of shots and then boosters each year. The doctor told me that the vaccine only covers about 60% of the cases of lyme disease.... not good enough odds for me.

I am a firm believer that, as the article says... you are your dog's
advocate and fortunately, for me, my vets don't feel threatened by
my questions or concerns at all. I guess I'm pretty lucky in that
regard.
 

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My dog got all her puppy shots last year but now shes a year old and I was wondering what else she needs and when..
 

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Why do baby animals need a series of shots and how many do they need?

When a baby kitten or puppy is born, its immune system is not yet mature; the baby is wide open for infection. Fortunately, nature has a system of protection. The mother produces a special milk in the first few days after giving birth. This milk is called "colostrum" and is rich in all the antibodies that the mother has to offer. As the babies drink this milk, they will be taking in their mother's immunity. After the first couple of days, regular milk is produced and the baby's intestines undergo what is called "closure," which means they are no longer able to take antibodies into their systems. These first two days are critical to determining what kind of immunity the baby will receive until its own system can take over. How long this maternal antibody lasts in a given puppy is totally individual. It can depend on the birth order of the babies, how well they nursed, and a number of other factors. Maternal antibodies against different diseases wear off after different times. We DO know that by 16-20 weeks of age, maternal antibodies are gone and the baby must be able continue on its own immune system.
While maternal immunity is present in the puppy’s system, any vaccines given will be inactivated. Vaccines will not be able to "take" until maternal antibody has sufficiently dropped. Puppies and kittens receive a series of vaccines ending at a time when we know the baby's own immune system should be able to respond. We could simply wait until the baby is old enough to definitely respond as we do with the rabies vaccination but this could leave a large window of vulnerability if the maternal antibody wanes early. To give babies the best chance of responding to vaccination, we vaccinate intermittently (usually every 2-4 weeks) during this period, in hope of gaining some early protection.
When a vaccine against a specific disease is started for the first time, even in adult animal, it is best to give at least two vaccinations. This is because the second vaccination will produce a much greater (logarithmically greater) response if it is following a vaccine given 2-4 weeks prior.
 
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