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We had a terrible experience a few days ago. My Maltese and I were visiting my mother and a neighbor's dog suddenly very viciously came after my dog. If I had not had my dog on a leash and the patio gated, I'm sure he would have killed my dog. The dog that attacked runs off leash with other big dogs and seems to get along well with them. Thank goodness that this was one time the owner had him on a leash.

I was talking to my dog's breeder and he said to keep the Maltese away from big dogs. He said that some bigger dogs will turn on a small dog and kill it regardless of how friendly they seem with other dogs their own size. I've had two nights of nightmares now reliving the possibilities.

I don't even want to socialize my dog now. I'm scared to death for him to be around anything larger than 10 pounds anymore.

By the way, I had to hold my little lion-hearted 7 pounder back. He also got aggressive in return and tried to go after the big dog. I understood his anger completely - I wanted to go after the dog, too, but I'm not 7 pounds. By the way, this big dog wasn't a normally vicious breed - it was a golden retriever but the terribly vicious way in which it came after my dog reminded me of a pit bull. So I'm just posting this FYI. I'll never trust another dog around my dog again.
 

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I'm sorry that had to happen. How scary! I once had a fresh-off-the-track greyhound come after my happily bouncing Lucy, apparently because she looked like the little bunny that they chased.

But don't let one bad experience with a big dog ruin big dogs for you forever. Many, many big dogs are gentle with Lucy. I'm not saying to let your little boy run free unprotected with a field full of huge dogs, but.. give them a chance.
 

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Kay,

I walk in the park every single day with my little one and always have him on a leash...he loves bigger dogs, who am I kidding he loves everything and everybody. But I have noticed that if we are not walking up to the dog and Teddy walks by from behind or comes around a corner...the bigger dog seems to think Teddy is lunch...Someone said that they might believe our little ones are rabits or squirels. This makes perfect sense to me because Teddy is known to hop a bit.

So, I try and be very careful when approaching any animal so that the animal knows we are there and friendly.

Teddy would just be devasted if I did not take him out every day to socialize with his friends...we have met so many others who also walk everyday...and even now walk with certain people every day. He looks forward to it...and will start nagging if I don't get moving in his time frame...


Just know that at any second...he could get reeled right up into Mommy's arms which is why a harness is so much safer than a collar.

Susan
 

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I agree that you have to be super careful, especially when food is involved. I dont even give treats to other dogs with mine near if shes not in my arms (she likes to try to steal them). But I'd never keep Phoebe from playing with dogs I know to be gentle, of course supervised. She loves them too much, and we just dont know anyone with a small dog
I actually am babysitting a big one this week and I have never laughed more over Phoebe! Shes in heaven


I'm glad you were there and he was leashed! There was another story on here not long ago with a strangers dog getting out of a car in the neighborhood. Very very sad. As much as we'd love to we just can't predict these things
 

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That must have been scary for you, thank goodness nothing happened to your baby.
I have noticed a change in Scooby now that he is a mature adult. He is just so good with other dogs but it is other people he is beginning to distrust.
Yesterday we were in a pet store and a nice lady came in with a sweet little Malt girlie in her arms. Well Scooby was beside himself and wanted to meet the little girlie of course so I took him over and they did the nose touching and his little tail was wagging madly, then the unthinkable happened, the lady went to pet him on the head and he snarled so loud at her that she got a fright.
I was horrified and told him he was very naughty and promptly moved him away. That poor lady walked off and I am sure she didn't think very well of mr. bossy pants after that.

I have to say though he has never liked anyone other than us picking him up and even though he is friendly and outgoing and makes a fuss of anyone he sees, if they try to pick him up he growls and moves out of reach.
 

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Originally posted by Kay@Aug 4 2005, 08:31 AM
We had a terrible experience a few days ago.  My Maltese and I were visiting my mother and a neighbor's dog suddenly very viciously came after my dog.  If I had not had my dog on a leash and the patio gated, I'm sure he would have killed my dog.  The dog that attacked runs off leash with other big dogs and seems to get along well with them.   Thank goodness that this was one time the owner had him on a leash.

I was talking to my dog's breeder and he said to keep the Maltese away from big dogs.  He said that some bigger dogs will turn on a small dog and kill it regardless of how friendly they seem with other dogs their own size.  I've had two nights of nightmares now reliving the possibilities.

I don't even want to socialize my dog now.  I'm scared to death for him to be around anything larger than 10 pounds anymore.

By the way, I had to hold my little lion-hearted 7 pounder back.  He also got aggressive in return and tried to go after the big dog.  I understood his anger completely - I wanted to go after the dog, too, but I'm not 7 pounds.  By the way, this big dog wasn't a normally vicious breed - it was a golden retriever but the terribly vicious way in which it came after my dog reminded me of a pit bull.  So I'm just posting this FYI.  I'll never trust another dog around my dog again.
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As someone who does pit bull rescue that comment about pit bulls completely irrated and annoyed me. Check your facts before comments like that. There are many of us trying in vain it seems at times to help save a great breed. Not only from the undeducated public mindset that you have displayed but also from the "owners" and I use that term loosly that see the dogs as a status symbol, somthing to fight abuse and treat as a money makeing machine. The irresponsible owners are ruining it for those of us that love our dogs as much as you love your malt. I know the following is long but it is very interesting if you read it all.

statistics can lie, here's the real truth

Between the years of 1965 and 2001 there were 101 fatalities atributed to "pit bulls" and pit bull crosses. This number is about twice as much as the next highest dog on the list. Sounds really scary, doesn't it? Those simple numbers are blared across the media and pointed to with fervor in courthouses looking to get the "pit bull" banned. The real truth of the matter is much more complicated than a single number.

First of all let's address the issue of breed. As I have stated before here, the "pit bull" is not a breed, but a 'type' of dog. There are 5 different breeds classified as "pit bull", and approximately another 13 or so that look similar enough to be mistaken for a pit bull even by a more experienced dog-lover. The problem arises when under the stress of an attack the victim or witness incorrectly identifies the breed. In the heat of the moment, any medium-sized short-haired muscular dog is a "pit bull". The dogs in the pictures were called a 'pit bull mix'. See if you can identify the pit bull HERE, and then think how hard it would be to pick if you were being attacked by one of these dogs, or were witnessing an attack. "Because there are so few fatal dog attacks, any error in breed identification can critically affect a breed's reputation. With only approximately 20 fatal attacks in any given year, inaccurate identification of a conservative three or four breeds can result in an approximate 20% margin of error"(1). For example: in 1989 in CA, a man was attacked by a pack of Shepherd/Doberman/unknown mixes that were originally identified as pit bulls, and in 2000 in FL a medium-sized reddish dog chained to a doghouse attacked and killed a child. The newspapers claimed the dog was a pit bull, but the shelter workers and sheriff's department classified the dog as a mixed breed dog, with no predominate breed. That being said, of the 101 fatal bites that occurred, an astonishing 57%, more than half, were inflicted by "pit bull type dogs (this includes anything that was reported to be a pit bull, but was unconfirmed)", 32% by pit bulls, 13% by pit bull crossbreeds, and only 2 bites are attributed to American Staffordshire Terriers. One attack was by a pack of 6 bull terriers that were allowed to roam free, although this attack is so old (1947) it is not included in the statistics. There are NO attacks attributed to the Staffordshire Terrier. (percentages are approximate)

Chart 1: summary of breeds

57% "pit bull" type dogs
32% pit bull terriers
13% mixed breed dog with "pit bull" apparant in breeding
2 attacks American Staffordshire Terrier
1 attack Bull Terrier
0 attacks Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Now let us turn our attention to the reasons behind the bites. There are several factors that contribute to a bite. One of the largest impacts on the numbers are chained dogs. "Chaining a dog creates an unnatural and unhealthy environment. Dogs require excercise, mental stimulation and social interaction with either other dogs or with the humans who aquired them. None of these requirements can be met living at the end of a chain."(1) Chained dogs make up 36% of all fatal "pit bull" attacks. The next largest group is dogs running loose, at 21%. (by "running loose" I refer to dogs allowed to run around the neighborhood frequently, not a dog that has simply gotten out). Shortly following this is visitors to the house, at 17%. Almost all the attacks in this category are small children that were left unattended with the unfamiliar dog. Another 9% of attacks occurred when the victim entered the property where the "pit bull" was housed, in most cases by climbing over the fence (or into the kennel in one case). In these cases the dog was defending its territory. There are 9 cases involving dogs used for fighting, 5 cases of dogs used as guard dogs, 2 cases of dogs guarding a place of business, 1 case of a dog used as a murder weapon, 1 case of gross human negligence (mother abandoned days old baby in yard with 2 "pit bulls"), and 1, yes only ONE case of pit bulls turning on thier owner. If you understand the cruelty these dogs are subjected to, it is supprising the numbers aren't higher. "Dogs are tortured, teased and abused in hopes of making them mean. Those refusing to fight or those who lose are horribly killed or left to die in alleyways... People from the worst segments of our society seek these animals out to guard drug houses, intimate other gang members, thwart police action and enhance thier vacuous self-esteem. Any real or imagined viciousness on the part of the Pit Bull breeds pales in comparison to the brutality, callous disrespect for life, and inhumanity of many of thier owners."(1) Also take into consideration the sheer numbers of "pit bulls" and pit crosses there are across the country. Although it its basically impossible to guess the actual population, you can get an idea how many there are, and the type of "quality care" they receive, from these few examples: New York City reports the Pit Bull to be its 3rd most populous dog in 2001, Los Angeles CA reports that 40% and San Francisco CA reports 1/3 of all dogs entering thier shelters are pit bulls or pit crosses, in 1999 the Pennsylvania SPCA reported finding over 4000 pit bulls wandering the streets, most scarred and/or abandonded, and the Michigan Humane Society reported that in only 3 of its shelters over 1,820 pit bulls were destroyed in 2000. It is estimated that there are at least 250,000 pits involved in dog fighting nationwide. The ADBA registered 220,000 American Pit Bull Terriers in 1999, making them the #1 dog in America. It is estimated that The American Pit Bull Terrier and other Bull Breeds make up 9% of the total canine population in the USA, which is more than 55 million dogs in the USA.


Chart 2: summary of circumstances

36% chained dogs
21% dogs allowed to run loose around the neighborhood
17% visitors (usually unattended children)
9% entered dogs property or territory
9 cases of dogs used for fighting
5 cases involving guard dogs
2 cases of dogs guarding place of business
1 case of dog used as murder weapon
1 case gross human negligence
1 case pair of pit bull type dogs attacked and killed owner
Compared to the sheer number of 'pit bulls' present, the number of attacks is supprisingly small, so why then do we hear about 'pit bull' attacks in the news every other day?

The media has vast influence over our perceptions of which breeds of dogs are dangerous, as they decide which dog attack stories to publish. With over 4.7 million dog bites recorded each year in the United States and with over 800,000 of these attacks serious enough to require medical attention, the resources for dog-bite stories appear unlimited. Yet, the media seems to delight in Pit bull related stories, so much so, that in their haste to report the latest Pit bull attack story the truth often takes a backseat to sensationalism.

Listed below is a small sampling of inaccurate and misleading media accounts that have caused irreparable damage to the image of Pit Bulls:

Killer Pit Bulls Rip Granny to Shreds New York Post (NYPost.com) Dec. 11, 2002
Pet Pit Bulls Kill Woman, 80, in Her Home The New York Times (nytimes.com) Dec. 11, 2002
[The victim's daughter and granddaughter (owner of the dogs) could not believe the dogs, a female Pit Bull and a male Lab/Pit mix attacked and killed the elderly woman. The family hired a forensic pathologist to review the case. It was determined that although the victim had sustained some dog bites, all the bites were non-lethal and post-mortem. The grandmother was not "ripped to shreds" by the dogs but died from cardiac arrhythmia. Both dogs were eventually returned to their owners.]

Pit Bull Attack Victim Leaves Hospital WTVO (Channel 17) April 25, 2003
Man Struggles to Recover from Pit Bull Attack WTVO (Channel 17) April 29, 2003
[The man in this case was never bitten by a Pit bull. Indeed, there is no mention of the dog making contact with the man at all. Instead, the man was running from the dog and he ran into the road and "slammed" into a passing van. He sustained serious injuries from the collision with the vehicle.]

Pit Bull Horror New York Daily News February 7, 2004
Pit Bull Mauls 3-Year-Old's Face New York Newsday February 6, 2004
[A Bronx family owned a Boxer dog and a German Shepherd puppy that usually were kept in the basement as guard dogs. Two days before the girl was bitten, the family took in a Pit Bull. The 3-year-old was alone playing with the three dogs when a dogfight started. At this point the girl was bitten in the face by the Boxer (also reported to be an American bulldog). It was later acknowledged that the Pit bull (also reported to be a Pit bull mix and a "pet bulldog") was not involved in the attack on the girl]

Cortland Pit Bull Mauling Death WBNG.com (Channel 12) Dec. 9, 2002
[It was later determined that although the Pit bull participated in the death of 24-year-old Eric Tallman, the dog did not inflict the fatal wounds. The victim died from blunt force injury. It was later revealed that the victim was beaten to death by an acquaintance over a drug debt.]

Barstow Trial Opens in Boy's Death: Pit bulls fatally mauled Cash Carson, 10. The Press-Enterprise May 5, 2001
Murder Charges Filed in Pit Bull Mauling The Associated Press June 17, 2000
[This tragic case of a 10-year-old boy killed by dogs was carried extensively in the media. The dogs were repeatedly headlined as "Pit Bulls". Neither of these dogs were "Pit Bulls". One appeared to be a Pit Bull Mix and the other dog (the male that inflicted the fatal wounds) was clearly a mixed breed dog. Animal Control and photographs of the dog more accurately identify him as a possible Chow/Pit Bull mixed breed.]

Vancouver Girl Badly Injured in Pit Bull Attack CTV News Dec. 23, 2002
[This was a very severe attack and as such garnered much media attention. As a result of more in-depth coverage the breed was later correctly identified as a Mastiff/Rottweiler mixed breed]

Family's Pit Bull Kills Boy, 20, months The Gainesville Sun May 8, 2000
20-month-old Killed by Bull Terrier Naples Daily News May 9, 2000
[This child was not killed by a Pit Bull, nor a Bull Terrier, nor a "family" dog. How the dog came to be labelled a "Pit bull" is unexplained. The owner described the dog to be a Labrador/Mastiff/Rottweiler cattle dog. The dog was used to herd cattle and was kept chained on the property. Animal control and the Alachua Sheriff's office confirm the dog was a mixed breed. Photographs of the dog reveal no discernable breed.]

Another serious problem with the image of Pit Bulls is the over-reporting of Pit Bull attacks vs. other breed attacks. Unquestionably, a disporportionate amount of media attention is given to Pit Bull attacks. One example of this is a recent fatal attack in Detroit by a Pit Bull. This story ran in over 30 separate national newspapers and was also picked up by FOX news, CNN and two British newspapers. Two weeks earlier a man was killed by his German Shepherd Dog and this story ran only in the local community newspaper. Proposed breed specific legislation as the result of an individual severe or fatal dog attack in a community appears to be a phenomena that arises almost exclusively from a Pit Bull or Rottweiler attack. Severe or fatal attacks by other breeds of dogs almost never initiate this kind of response. (2)

One final thing to consider: I previously stated that 'pit bulls' peaked in popularity in the '80s, which was very shortly followed by a peak in bad breeding/bad training/etc. This chart, divided by year, shows there were very few bites, averaging less than one a year, prior to the 1980s, but beginning in the '80s, there has been two peaks in bites. I believe this represents time when after the breed first got its bad reputation and lost popularity, then gained popularity again with thugs, drug dealers, and wanna-be dog-fighters due to the tough reputation they were supposed to have. The 'pit bull' is again on a downswing in bites, and unless any other miscreants decide to trash the breed further, should settle back to its pre '80s average of aprox. 1 bite or less a year.

I believe that these numbers speak for themselves, and presented with the facts behind the statistics, the numbers aren't as scary as they once were. It is apparant that a happy, healthy, well adjusted, well cared-for, loved family 'pit bull' is as good and safe as any other breed.
 

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Well, I just can't believe that I irritated someone with that post. I never meant to malign a breed of dog. I was just using it as an example so that people could visualize how bad the attack was. Sorry - maybe I shouldn't post in here.
 

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Here we go again... :new_Eyecrazy:
 

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According to this, Pit Bulls account for nearly a quarter of all fatal dog attacks.

The news here in North Carolina is full of stories of pit bull attacks. According to this, North Carolina is #8 on the list of fatal dog attacks.

Their "bad rep" appears well earned, at least in this state.


"FATAL DOG ATTACKS"
The Stories Behind the Statistics
by Karen Delise

THE STATISTICS - FATAL DOG ATTACKS IN THE U.S. FROM 1965 - 2001 *

The study covers 431 documented human fatalities from a dog attack.

Location of Attack
25% of all fatal attacks were inflicted by chained dogs
25% resulted from dogs loose in their yard
23% occurred inside the home
17% resulted from attacks by dogs roaming off their property
10% involved leashed dogs or miscellaneous circumstances

Number of Dogs
68% of all fatal attacks were inflicted by a single dog
32% was the result of a multiple dog attack

Victim Profile
79% of all fatal attacks were on children under the age of 12
12% of the victims were the elderly, aged 65 - 94
9% of the victims were 13 - 64 years old

The age group with the highest number of fatalities were children under the age of 1 year old; accounting for 19% of the deaths due to dog attack. Over 95% of these fatalities occurred when an infant was left unsupervised with a dog(s).

The age group with the second-highest number of fatalities were 2-year-olds; accounting for 11% of the fatalities due to dog attack. Over 87% of these fatalities occurred when the 2-year-old child was left unsupervised with a dog(s) or the child wandered off to the location of the dog(s).

Boys aged 1 - 12 years old were 2.5 times more likely to be the victim of a fatal dog attack than girls of the same age.

Breeds Involved
Pit Bull and Pit-bull-type dogs (21%), Mixed breed dogs (16%),
Rottweilers (13%), German Shepherd Dogs (9%), Wolf Dogs (5%),
Siberian Huskies (5%), Malamutes (4%), Great Danes (3%),
St. Bernards (3%), Chow Chows (3%), Doberman Pinschers (3%),
other breeds & non-specified breeds (15%).

Reproductive Status of Dogs
Overwhelmingly, the dogs involved in fatal dog attacks were unaltered males.
From 2000-2001 there were 41 fatal dog attacks. Of these, 28 were attacks by a single dog and 13 fatalities were caused by multiple dogs.

Of the 28 single dogs responsible for a fatal attack between 2000-2001;
26 were males and 2 were females. Of the 26 males, 21 were found to be intact (the reproductive status of the remaining 5 males dogs could not be determined).

States with the Most Fatalities - 1965-2001
California, 47; Texas, 32; Alaska, 26; Florida, 22; New York, 19; Michigan, 18; Illinois, 18; North Carolina, 17; Georgia, 16.
 

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Define a pitbull type dog please? Part of the biggest problem with these statistic's is that many mixes are thrown in the "pit bull" category. And where are black labs on that list? Right now they are very high on the bite list due to inbreeding and what not. Ask those who work in the vet's office on how many of the VICIOUS dogs that come in there that they have to muzzle, rabies pole and basically pin down to even touch are pits. I bet the answer will amaze you. Ask them what they think of pitties. Ask them what breed tries to bite them the most. Media has skewed the publics view so badly, am staffs and pits are one of the top breeds to pass the CGC. Look at tall the therapy dogs out there that are pitties. Those are the rule not the expeption as so many think.

http://www.sorryagain.com/

Go there and just look. It is a photo site mostly maybe that will help some see past the medias painting of a great breed.
 

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Well I have to agree with you on your opinion here Dhorinda, I am sure though that in this instance it was an innocent figure of speech which I chose to bypass in that way.
I do agree though that many people tend to blame a particular breed for all the bad that happens, but it is purely because of the publicity that it gets in the media.
In Australia pit bulls are banned, at least where I come from. Also the Rottweirler has a terrible reputation as well purely because of a few incidents which are given huge media coverage. If a child is attacked by a Rottie the breed is classed as vicious. If the same type of incident occurs with a less known breed there is hardly any mention of what breed of dog was resposible.
I once owned a beautiful Rottie and he was the most gentle loving giant I have ever known. I got him from a reputable breeder who belonged to the Rottie Club and she had to adhere strictly to the rules of the breeding code. These are the only people anyone should consider to purchase a dog from as it is far safer and you can be assured that the dog will grow into a well adjusted and good natured animal provided you spend the time and effort in the training and raising of that puppy. That dog must be socialized properly from the very beginning.
My point in this is, if a dog is properly bred, has resposible owners who train the animal and have full control at all times, no matter the breed that dog will be a pleasure to be near. Don't blame the breed so much as the irresponsible owner who has no control of a dog in a public place. If the laws were that only responsible breeders were allowed to breed particular breeds using careful selection of bloodlines to have healthy, good natured animals there would be no problems. It is the back yard breeders who spoil it for all of us by breeding their dogs to any carelessly bred male or female purely to supply the demand and make money.
I feel that a dog with a nasty disposition often reflects not the breed so much as the person who bred it and the person who has raised it to be the way it is.
I do hope you agree with at least some of what I have said.
 

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Originally posted by Kay@Aug 4 2005, 11:01 AM
Well, I just can't believe that I irritated someone with that post.  I never meant to malign a breed of dog.  I was just using it as an example so that people could visualize how bad the attack was.  Sorry - maybe I shouldn't post in here.
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Don't fret.... I know what you meant and I sure hope you will continue posting here and I very much appreciate your letting us know of what happened to you.
 

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Originally posted by Kallie/Catcher's Mom+Aug 4 2005, 11:17 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-Kay
@Aug 4 2005, 11:01 AM
Well, I just can't believe that I irritated someone with that post.  I never meant to malign a breed of dog.  I was just using it as an example so that people could visualize how bad the attack was.  Sorry - maybe I shouldn't post in here.
<div align="right">index.php?act=findpost&pid=87110
Don't fret.... I know what you meant and I sure hope you will continue posting here and I very much appreciate your letting us know of what happened to you.

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Please don't feel that you irritated me in any way as I fully understood your point and that it was made simply as a figure of speech. I chose to read it as that myself but I also agree that some good breeds of dogs suffer because of the bad publicity they get.
Please don't leave, I didn't take offence to your post in any way and I did appreciate your warning very much, and the fact that it was indeed not the type of dog one would expect to have that disposition. It just goes to show that any breed of dog can have that tendency if allowed to run uncontrolled.
 

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Originally posted by Scoobydoo+Aug 4 2005, 10:24 AM-->
Originally posted by Kallie/Catcher's [email protected] 4 2005, 11:17 AM
<!--QuoteBegin-Kay
@Aug 4 2005, 11:01 AM
Well, I just can't believe that I irritated someone with that post.  I never meant to malign a breed of dog.  I was just using it as an example so that people could visualize how bad the attack was.  Sorry - maybe I shouldn't post in here.
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Don't fret.... I know what you meant and I sure hope you will continue posting here and I very much appreciate your letting us know of what happened to you.

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[/QUOTE]

Please don't feel that you irritated me in any way as I fully understood your point and that it was made simply as a figure of speech. I chose to read it as that myself but I also agree that some good breeds of dogs suffer because of the bad publicity they get.
Please don't leave, I didn't take offence to your post in any way and I did appreciate your warning very much, and the fact that it was indeed not the type of dog one would expect to have that disposition. It just goes to show that any breed of dog can have that tendency if allowed to run uncontrolled.

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I agree! I knew what you meant. Please don't leave.
Thank you for the warning.
 

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If you choose to leave that is on you, however my irratation isn't with you but your mindset which stems directly from the media's portrayl of pit bulls. I am sure you have never seen a pit bull attack in person but yet that is your expample because "everyone knows they are absolutely vicious". Please understand as someone who has done rescue w/ this great breed for years. I have seen so many unspeakable horrific things done to this great breed, where is the publicity for the guys who put the pit on the bbq grill, or used the 8 wk old pup for bait? They get nothing more than a tap on the wrist because after all it is just a pit bull they are abusing. I have seen countless dogs PTS because there is simply no where to go for them after they were bred to fight and won't. I see shelters full everyday knowing majority of those pitts will be put to sleep we help the ones we can and yes we do cull. We only pull the absolutely sound pittie, the one who will be an ambassador for the breed and help show everyone they aren't what the media paints them to be. Those of us who love our dogs are now being told that guess what even though your dog has never done anything has his CGC and a variety of OB and Therapy titles must go because he is a pit bull. Imagine someone coming into your home and taking your baby simply because he is a maltese. That is what we are fighting. We are fighting to keep our beloved pets. That are loved to the same level that you love your malt. So again my irratation isn't with you but your comment and the media that put that figure of speach in your head.
 

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Originally posted by a2z@Aug 4 2005, 10:57 AM
A pit bull just killed a 15-month old girl two days ago in our area.
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That is just terrible, and I am so sorry that happened.
Once again, I have to ask though, how on earth did a dog get to a child of that age. Where were the parents? Where was the owner of the dog? What happened to provoke the dog? Why was a child left in a position where a dog was able to get to her? There are all kinds of circumstances in these dreadful incidents that are not reported, just that it happened and that it was a particlar breed of dog that did it.
I am so very sorry for the family that has to go through such a tragedy, but in fairness that could have been any breed of dog resposible, and it does happen but there are circumstances that can avoid these things happening if everyone concerned is more stringent in the safety of their children and the control of their animals.
 

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Originally posted by Scoobydoo+Aug 4 2005, 10:58 AM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-a2z
@Aug 4 2005, 10:57 AM
A pit bull just killed a 15-month old girl two days ago in our area.
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That is just terrible, and I am so sorry that happened.
Once again, I have to ask though, how on earth did a dog get to a child of that age. Where were the parents? Where was the owner of the dog? What happened to provoke the dog? Why was a child left in a position where a dog was able to get to her? There are all kinds of circumstances in these dreadful incidents that are not reported, just that it happened and that it was a particlar breed of dog that did it.
I am so very sorry for the family that has to go through such a tragedy, but in fairness that could have been any breed of dog resposible, and it does happen but there are circumstances that can avoid these things happening if everyone concerned is more stringent in the safety of their children and the control of their animals.
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Here is another example of a "pit bull" attack. Now you tell me who is really to blame the dog or the stupid owner? by the way the mother is now facing charges of child endangerment.

The mother of a 12-year-old boy killed in his own home by at least one of the family's two pit bulls says she had been so concerned about one of the dogs that she shut her son in the basement to protect him.

Maureen Faibish said she ordered Nicholas to stay in the basement while she did errands on June 3, the day he was attacked by one or both of the dogs. She said she was worried about the male dog, Rex, who was acting possessive because the female, Ella, was in heat.

"I put him down there, with a shovel on the door," Faibish said in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle. "And I told him: `Stay down there until I come back.' Typical Nicky, he wouldn't listen to me."

Faibish said she felt compelled to call the newspaper Saturday to defend herself against widespread public outrage directed at families with children who own pit bulls, deeming them irresponsible parents.

"That's not true. My kids got along great with" the dogs, she said. "We were never seeing any kind of violent tendencies."

But on the day of the attack, Faibish said she was worried about the male dog's aggression so she locked her son in the basement.

The boy apparently found a way to open the basement door. That's when his mom believes he walked in on the dogs while they were mating and was attacked by Rex.

"It was Rex. I know it in my heart," Faibish said. "My younger dog (Ella) was in heat and anyone who came near her, Rex saw as a threat. He may have been trying to mate. It was a freak accident. It was just the heat of the moment."
 

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Originally posted by LadysMom@Aug 4 2005, 11:04 AM
According to this, Pit Bulls account for nearly a quarter of all fatal dog attacks. 

The news here in North Carolina is full of stories of pit bull attacks. According to this, North Carolina is #8 on the list of fatal dog attacks.

Their "bad rep" appears well earned, at least in this state.


"FATAL DOG ATTACKS"
The Stories Behind the Statistics
by Karen Delise

THE STATISTICS - FATAL DOG ATTACKS IN THE U.S. FROM 1965 - 2001 *

The study covers 431 documented human fatalities from a dog attack.

Location of Attack
25% of all fatal attacks were inflicted by chained dogs
25% resulted from dogs loose in their yard
23% occurred inside the home
17% resulted from attacks by dogs roaming off their property
10% involved leashed dogs or miscellaneous circumstances

Number of Dogs
68% of all fatal attacks were inflicted by a single dog
32% was the result of a multiple dog attack

Victim Profile
79% of all fatal attacks were on children under the age of 12
12% of the victims were the elderly, aged  65 - 94
9% of the victims were 13 - 64 years old

The age group with the highest number of fatalities were children under the age of 1 year old; accounting for 19% of  the deaths due to dog attack. Over 95% of these fatalities occurred when an infant was left unsupervised with a dog(s).

The age group with the second-highest number of fatalities were 2-year-olds;  accounting for 11% of the fatalities due to dog attack. Over 87% of these fatalities occurred when the 2-year-old child was left unsupervised with a dog(s) or the child wandered off to the location of the dog(s).

Boys aged 1 - 12 years old were 2.5 times more likely to be the victim of a fatal dog attack than girls of the same age.

Breeds Involved
Pit Bull and Pit-bull-type dogs (21%), Mixed breed dogs (16%),
Rottweilers (13%), German Shepherd Dogs (9%), Wolf Dogs (5%),
Siberian Huskies (5%), Malamutes (4%), Great Danes (3%),
St. Bernards (3%), Chow Chows (3%), Doberman Pinschers (3%),
other breeds & non-specified breeds (15%).

Reproductive Status of Dogs
Overwhelmingly, the dogs involved in fatal dog attacks were unaltered males.
From 2000-2001 there were 41 fatal dog attacks. Of these, 28 were attacks by a single dog and 13 fatalities were caused by multiple dogs.

Of the 28 single dogs responsible for a fatal attack between 2000-2001;
26 were males and 2 were females.  Of the 26 males, 21 were found to be intact (the reproductive status of the remaining 5 males dogs could not be determined).

States with the Most Fatalities -  1965-2001
California, 47; Texas, 32; Alaska, 26; Florida, 22; New York, 19; Michigan, 18; Illinois, 18; North Carolina, 17; Georgia, 16.
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Again, these statistics reflect lack of supervision where children are concerned.
Poor control of dogs from their owners and lack of training more than likely in many incidents.
The law should be that any animal that is not kept by a registered breeder should be desexed.
Bad owners who allow their dogs to roam the streets unleashed should be banned from ownership and heavily fined, and a dog that is accidently released is not an excuse as there are such things as locks on gates that can prevent a release.
If a dog is chained in a yard it should be in an area where a child has no access because quite often a child can provoke an animal, and I know this side of the attacks is never stated in the reports. Children are often bitten because they tend to tease the animal and a chained dog has no way to get away so it does what it can to protect itself, that is instinct and any breed of dog will attack if provoked if there is no way it can escape ie being chained or confined in a place where it cannot retreat from the one who is provoking it.
 
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