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We're not having a good day after holidays for Tink. She has vomited twice, is stretching a lot, and I've noticed her having spasms. The poor baby just looks miserable. I haven't fed her yet and I don't think I will. I'm freefeeding water.
 

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Did anyone feed her people food during the holiday. What do you mean by spasms? Did you call the vet? How old is she?
 

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The uncle fed her some ham, and she made a habit of dumpster diving. Eek. But she's only vomiting up white phelm stuff. I mean she's shaking a little bit and I see her little body spasm. She did eat some grass when we were outdoors earlier. She's four. My vets going to get tired of me with this dog. Lol.
 

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Not to panic you, but please take her to the vet asap. Spasming isn't normal and ham can cause pancreatitis - something best caught/treated EARLY!!! Ham and bacon are the number one triggers... :( Poor little one :(

I have gotten to the point when I have people coming over who I know won't honor the house rules of please no snacks to the doggies of putting them in another room/xpen or crate til it's safe to come out. Having a sick doggy afterwards isn't a treat for anyone. :(
 

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"What are the symptoms of pancreatitis?

Symptoms of acute pancreatitis may range from mild to very severe. The symptoms are similar to those of other diseases and may include a very painful abdomen, abdominal distention, lack of appetite, depression, dehydration, a 'hunched up' posture, vomiting, and perhaps diarrhea. Fever often accompanies these symptoms. Animals with more severe disease can develop heart arrhythmias, sepsis (body-wide infection), difficulty breathing, and a life-threatening condition called disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which results in multiple hemorrhages. If the inflammation is severe, organs surrounding the pancreas could be 'autodigested' by pancreatic enzymes released from the damaged pancreas and become permanently damaged.
Dogs with chronic pancreatitis may show signs similar to those in acute pancreatitis, but they are often milder, and severe complications are less likely.

How is pancreatitis diagnosed?
To diagnose pancreatitis, other causes of the symptoms must be ruled out. A complete history is taken and a thorough physical exam, a complete blood count, chemistry panel and urinalysis are performed. Blood levels of two pancreatic enzymes, amylase and lipase, may be obtained. The cPLI (canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity) test is another diagnostic tool. In addition, radiography (x-rays) and ultrasound can also help in making the diagnosis. A biopsy can result in a conclusive diagnosis, but is not commonly performed.
How is pancreatitis treated?
The goals of treatment are to:
  • Correct dehydration
  • Provide pain relief
  • Control vomiting
  • Provide nutritional support
  • Prevent complications
Dehydration and electrolyte imbalances are common in dogs with acute pancreatitis, so supplemental fluids are given either by the subcutaneous or intravenous route; depending upon the severity of the condition.

Dogs who are experiencing pain can be treated with pain relievers such as meperidine or butorphanol. Medications are often given to decrease the amount of vomiting. If vomiting is severe, food, water, and oral medications are withheld for at least 24 hours. Depending upon the dog's response, food intake can be started again after a day or more. The dog is generally fed small meals of a bland, easily digestible, high-carbohydrate, low-fat food. In some cases, it may be necessary to use tube feeding to provide proper nutrition.

If the pancreatitis was caused by a medication, the medication should be stopped. If it was caused by a toxin, infection, or other condition, the appropriate therapy for the underlying condition should be started.
In rare instances where there are intestinal complications or the development of a pancreatic abscess, surgery may be necessary.
What is the prognosis for dogs with pancreatitis?
Pancreatitis can be a very unpredictable disease. In most cases, if the pancreatitis was mild and the pet only had one episode, chances of recovery are good and keeping the dog on a low-fat diet may be all that is necessary to prevent recurrence or complications. In other cases, what appears to be a mild case may progress, or may be treated successfully only to have recurrences, sometimes severe.
Some animals develop chronic pancreatitis, which can lead to diabetes mellitus and/or pancreatic insufficiency, also called 'maldigestion syndrome.' In pancreatic insufficiency, the nutrients in food are passed out in the feces undigested. A dog with this disease often has a ravenous appetite, diarrhea, and weight loss. Even though he is eating, he could literally starve to death. Treatment for pancreatic insufficiency is lifelong and expensive, but is possible. The dog's digestive enzymes are replaced through a product processed from pancreases of hogs and cattle which contain large quantities of the digestive enzymes. A change in diet with added nutritional supplements may also be necessary.
Summary Acute pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition, and early recognition and treatment can improve chances of recovery. In dogs, fever, lack of appetite, depression and vomiting are the most common signs. Treatment is based on correcting the dehydration and maintaining proper fluid and electrolyte balances, controlling other symptoms and providing nutritional support. "


Please take her to the vet right away and keep us posted...
 

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The uncle fed her some ham, and she made a habit of dumpster diving. Eek. But she's only vomiting up white phelm stuff. I mean she's shaking a little bit and I see her little body spasm. She did eat some grass when we were outdoors earlier. She's four. My vets going to get tired of me with this dog. Lol.
Shaking or trembling is a sign of pain and whenever mine have done that, I don't mess around at all but call the vet immediately. It's only happened to me twice but both times it was necessary that they saw the vet asap.

Have you contacted your vet yet?
 

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It's Monday, and the Vet is opened. Go fast. She could have pancreatitis. Fatty Christmas food could cause that. Don't beat yourself up, but get her some medical attention. As small as these dogs are, they can dehydrate and go into shock VERY easily!!
 

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Like the others have said get her to a vet it sounds like pancreatitis. I hope you have taken her to a vet by now, how's she doing?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
We're back, saw the vet but wouldn't you know it she's a happy go lucky puppy at the Vets office. Sometimes I swear she's conspiring to give me a heart attack. We're witholding food for the rest of the night. But that's it.
 

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I am glad she is alright!! I hope that she continues to feel well. Let us know how she is tomorrow!
 

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So glad your baby is OK. Tinker the little stinker.....:innocent:
Sammie gets into everything. I just spent 5 min chasing him around the den to get a paper towel. My poor knees. Anyway, I bought the garbage can that hangs inside the cabinet attached to the door and it has a lid. He cant get to it or even reach it now.
 

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I am just seeing this. Glad you took her to the vet. You lucked out. A co-worker's father gave her Yorkie a little piece of ham on Christmas a few years ago and ended up with a $2,500 ER vet bill.

Ham is a known pancreatitis trigger. No more ham, ever, or any other pork products (bacon, sausage, etc.) Pancreatitis can be life threatening. Repeated bouts can also cause damage to the pancreas and lead to diabetes.

Pancreatitis (Inflammation) in Dogs
 

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Thanks everyone, she's currently galloping around the house searching every nook and cranny for crumbs. Poor thing, you'll eat in the morning.
 

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I'm glad she's doing OK. You really did dodge a bullet on this one. I hope you keep her crated away from those who may give her food that could cause serious issues. Or get them to promise not to do it again. I think people get pleasure out of seeing how happy pups are when they get a treat. Maybe give your relatives healthy treats that they can give her instead of high fat dangerous foods. Mine go crazy for lettuce, blueberries, teeny apple pieces, carrot and banana.
 

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How is she doing today?

Sher that is a great suggestion however it reminds me of Zoe's first Christmas with me. I had specific instructions on what was and was not safe or acceptable to give her at Christmas. Zoe was learning lots of tricks at that time and my nieces and nephews were having a lot of fun getting her to do her tricks for them. I didn't realize what was happening until later that evening and her belly was so big she literally waddled! She did not have much spunk that evening or even the next day. When I saw her like that my niece (only 12 at the time) innocently said...well she did have an awful lot of treats. :smpullhair: Needless to say she was watched much more carefully until I knew my family new better.
 

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Thanks heavens... was very worried!!!! I would definitely crate her away/separate her from relatives that don't practice the no feeding rule. We also had a trash diver and I solved that one by getting a stainless steel lidded trash can. No more dumpster diving tummy aches!

Truly happy it ended well - lucky lucky lucky!!! :)
 

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She's great today. But the Lhasa has greasy stool. I'm seriously tempted to send the Beneful Healthy Harvest to my grandma's farm dogs and boil them some hamburger and rice until this blows over.
 

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I'm not trying to be mean, but you really should reconsider feeding your dogs Beneful. It is really bad food. It has artificial colors in it. Plus it has NO meat at all. Where's the chicken, or beef, or turkey? All I see is animal fat and animal digest. Both are not identified and could come from any animal, and aren't really meat, just by-products. Plus it has sugar and propylene glycol, that's anti-freeze. Also, its mostly grain. So its like you're feeding them cereal for their whole meal. Just think about it for a bit.

Ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, whole wheat flour, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), soy protein concentrate, soy flour, water, rice flour, pearled barley, sugar, tricalcium phosphate, propylene glycol, animal digest, dicalcium phosphate, salt, phosphoric acid, sorbic acid (a preservative), calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, L-Lysine monohydrochloride, dried spinach, dried apples, dried sweet potatoes, choline chloride, calcium propionate (a preservative), added color (Red 40, Yellow 5, Blue 2, Yellow 6), Vitamin E supplement, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, copper sulfate, Vitamin B-12 supplement, DL-Methionine, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, garlic oil, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), folic acid, biotin, sodium selenite.
 
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