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I have a 9 years old poodle mix who has a bad bad bad temper and whom I was never able to completely train and control all these years.

The other day she growled at me and bitten me so hard that I had to go to the doctor and get 2 shots of antibiotics plus I am taking antibiotics by mouth for 1 week. And this, only because I motioned her to move down from my bed.

This dog is a result of a BYB and I was never able to take full control of her.
She had bitten me in the past but I was able to avoid big injuries. However, this time, in one week she has injured me twice, for no real reason. I am beginning to be frightened of her and am thinking of giving her to a shelter. But our closest shelter will not keep her longer than 1 week.

I am worried that with a behavior issue such as hers, she will not be adoptable, specially at the age of 9, no one will want her. On the other hand, I am really frightened of her.

What is one to do?

I bought a cage and put her there at night, but she cries most of the time.
So the 3rd night I let her sleep out of the cage, but not on my bed. I was successful to keep her off my bed during the night which IS WHAT I WANT.

I need all the advise I can get, I am very very frightened of her and I think she knows it and takes advantage of it. I know that I should show control, but how do I take control when she snaps, growls and bites????

Thank you for any advise.
 

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Poor girl. Have you ruled out a health issue. Perhaps she is in pain or uncomfortable. If not, you may need to consult a behavorist. I am no expert, but I'm sure there is a reason this behavior is happening. You owe it to her to explore all the options.
 

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I would do this:

1. A trip to the vet to rule out a health issue.

If the dog is in good physical health:

2 Hire an animal behaviorist.

Have you vaccinated the dog lately? I would avoid them until you get the problem figured out. I had a dog I pet sat for that became extremely aggressive after being over-vaccinated. Even Patricia McConnell - an animal behaviorist, has brought this up on her blog.
 

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I would do this:

1. A trip to the vet to rule out a health issue. If the dog is in good physical health

2 Hire an animal behaviorist.

Have you vaccinated the dog lately? I would avoid them until you get the problem figured out. I had a dog I pet sat for that became extremely aggressive after being over-vaccinated. Even Patricia McConnell - an animal behaviorist, has brought this up on her blog.


:unsure:She doesn't have any health issue, nor has been over-vaccinated:huh:

I have noticed that since she has been in the cage at nights, when I tell her, during the day, to get off my bed, she gets off my bed right-a-way.

I think she is learning who is the boss finally. Maybe the cage did the trick:blink:
 

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I won't pretend to have all the answers for you but until you get this figured out I would put her on a schedule where oyu are the boss and you decide when she eats, goes out, gets walks, and enjoys time with her siblings. I would enforce a strict no on the furniture policy with her and keep her on a leash in the home that way you can control her and she can't go far from you. But, I do suggest you meet with a trainer who can help address these issues.
 

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another thought : she could be physically healthy but since she is 9 years old you cannot rule out that she is getting dementia.

I am very very frightened of her and I think she knows it and takes advantage of it
she does. Try not to show it to her. Wear gloves if you have to handle her. Maybe the cage will do the trick.
 

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Oh bless her sweet heart. If you have ruled all physical problems, then a qualified behavorilist is in order. Not an expert, but sometimes aggression is a form of anxiety.

I had my dear Flakey for 15 years, 15 glorious wonderful years, he will always be my son, but did have aggression issues. Most if not all was my and hubbies lack of knoweldge on how to deal with these issues. Back in that day, we asked the vet, but if it were today, I would seek out a behavoirlist who uses positive reinforcement.

Flakey would never allow us to pick him up, he did bite me, but afterwards, after the state he was in, he felt so bad. We loved every ounce of him, and still do.

Furbabies don't want to act this way, they don't feel good acting this way. Call your vet and describe the problems you have been having, and see if the can reccomend a behavoirlist, again, one who uses postiive reinforcement.

Flakey was the most loving little boy, but bless him, he did suffer with anxiety, and it was our repsonsibility to take care of that. He actually was my Dad's favorite :).

Flakey lived a very very very happy life, we just worked around his issues, knew his trigger points and avoided them. But again, if it were today, I would take my little guy to a behavorilist.

There was one of my friends, who said, "get rid of that dog" :( Stabbed me right in the heart. Sadly, most probably would have, but he was our son, our responsibility, and we owed it to him and he gave us so much love back in return.

Sometimes these problems can be fixed by a trained expert rather shortly. Actually they moreso train the owner, and give them the loving tools to deal with these issues.

It breaks my heart thinking what my Flakey went through during his bouts :(, like if he was under our bed and refused to come out. We just nutured who he was, loved who he was, all of him, but now I know that a behavorilist would have been best for him.

I miss my dear boy so much.

Sorry for rambling, but just trying to share, that it really is in no way the furbabies fault. Just like if they got an illness, you would seek a vet to cure, same thing with a temperment issue, seek an expert, it will not only help you, but give your dear girl some releif as well. Trust me, they do not feel good, or are in a good place, when they are showing signs of aggression.

Just curious, why would you think of adopting her out? Hope you don't mind me asking.
 

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sammy - i have a great trainer in the south bay, rebecca mandell. she only uses positive training techniques, including nothing in life is free (sounds like that is starting to work for you). please let me know if you want her number. she does privates and also group classes in hermosa beach through their parks and recreations and she was just voted favorite trainer by the beach reporter. :)
 

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1. No shelter should adopt out your dog based on her history. If the dog is placed in a shelter, it should be euthanized or permanently fostered. Your dog is a huge liability. It would be dangerous to place her in someone else's house.

2. Unless your dog has been to the vet since the two sudden bites, she needs to go. Health problems can crop up very quickly and behavior change (such as worsening of aggression) is one of the most common signs.

3. There is LOTS you can do for your dog. And this requires you consulting a professional. Please be sure to be up front with your dog's bite history. Not all trainers will take that type of liability. The ideal would be to see a veterinary behaviorist. A baby gate keeping her out of your room would be a simple solution for now. Crating her for safety is a good plan in the meantime.
 

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1. No shelter should adopt out your dog based on her history. If the dog is placed in a shelter, it should be euthanized or permanently fostered. Your dog is a huge liability. It would be dangerous to place her in someone else's house.

2. Unless your dog has been to the vet since the two sudden bites, she needs to go. Health problems can crop up very quickly and behavior change (such as worsening of aggression) is one of the most common signs.

3. There is LOTS you can do for your dog. And this requires you consulting a professional. Please be sure to be up front with your dog's bite history. Not all trainers will take that type of liability. The ideal would be to see a veterinary behaviorist. A baby gate keeping her out of your room would be a simple solution for now. Crating her for safety is a good plan in the meantime.[/QUOTE]


Jackie, I completely agree and also think that is wonderful advice on points 2 and 3.

I also think, a dog who is in need of training, should not be placed in a shelter at all.

As far as the dog being a liability, with our Flakey, hubby and I were ever so careful with him. He was not aggressive towards others, and rarely would show his aggression, in his case it actually got better with him, with age. I think that is only because hubby and I knew his few trigger points and always avoided them.

The beauty and love that Flakey brought to our lives, the love and direction he gave to my Kara and Tina Marie, the tears he licked off my sisters face when she was going through a very difficult time, are moments that I will forever cherish.

Jackie, I admire you so highly as well as your advice always, and completely agree with your points 2 and 3. But it would hurt me to my heart, for a dog to be put down, without giving a chance first and I do think that is what you are reccomending.

Hubby and I do not have any children, so that was never a factor, as far as Flakey having a moment.

Just wanted to share my thoughts.

ETA: Flakey's aggression started at age 1 1/2 years old. He growled while I was brushing him, and had moved his leg. So we took him to the vet to rule out any health issues. There were none, thankfully.

Additionally, when we took him to the vets throughout his life, we asked the staff to muzzle hime during the exam. Flakey never acted up during a vet exam, but since he did demonstrate aggresive behaviour at home, we not only wanted to protect the staff, on the off chance he had an incident, but also for him. As after an incident, he was very very very upset. The staff were taken back at our request, but we did explain his difficulties. But he never misbehaved there (actually he was too scared).

Sorry for rambling, just brings back so many memories of my cherished boy.
 

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Personally, whether or not a dog deserves a chance hinges on a competent evaluation of the dog and an owner who is willing and capable to put in the work as well as able to ensure safety of all involved. So, I think the dog should be properly evaluated. What comes of that cannot be predicted over the internet. It is always a very personal, individual decision.
 

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Personally, whether or not a dog deserves a chance hinges on a competent evaluation of the dog and an owner who is willing and capable to put in the work as well as able to ensure safety of all involved. So, I think the dog should be properly evaluated. What comes of that cannot be predicted over the internet. It is always a very personal, individual decision.
Jackie, that is so very very true. Thanks so much for your advice on this thread and listening to my ramblings.

But very true.
 
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