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Discussion Starter #1
well i was wondering what is a good age for breeding? i have a boy he is about 8 monthes now but what should i no about breeding? what could happen to him any thing bad? i no there is some test i need to do before i breed to see if he is good for breeding but what are the test.. im new at this can any one help?
 

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Originally posted by peanut@Jan 26 2005, 08:09 AM
well i was wondering what is a good age for breeding? i have a boy he is about 8 monthes now but what should i no about breeding? what could happen to him any thing bad? i no there is some test i need to do before i breed to see if he is good for breeding but what are the test.. im new at this can any one help?

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Well, 8 month to me is NOwere close to being old enough to breed.
There is A LOT to know, you can not just say I want too breed and worry later about whats going on. Youre Male should be testet and Vet checked before you even decided to breed him. You already made the choice that YOU are going to breed this Puppy without the Vet check, and without being informed.

DO the right thing, inform youreself first, bring youre Puppy to the Vet have him checked!!! And asked ureself this..
WHY are you going to breed him? DO you have a female? Is the female healthy and healthy enough to carry Puppys? Is she Old enough? What happends if one of the pups gets sick? Are u willing to be responsible and take care of the Puppy?

My BEST Advice is READ READ READ!!!!!!!

not trying to give you a hard time just given you advice,,,,,inform youreself first then breed if you still think thats what you want to do .
 

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This question comes up periodically.

Good advice from JMM on a recent discussion here on breeding a male dog (Quinn Poser):

In order for him to be ready to mate you need to:

1. Show him to his championship or send him out with a handler to finish.

2. Test his bile acids, certify his knees with OFA, have an annual eye exam by a veterinary ophthalmologist, and have a thyroid panel done for starters. Any other health problems like allergies may also preclude him from being a candidate for breeding.

3. He should be at least 2 years old. There is no rush to breed a male. I would probably wait longer unless you are breeding a litter to keep yourself to see what he produces early on.

4. If this is your first stud dog, you should have all bitches he is bred to, including any of your own, pre-approved by his breeder. It takes years to really learn about canine structure and get a decent grasp on genetics. Be sure you keep under your mentor's wing for a while. The breeder also knows a lot about what is behind him and you need to learn about that to select good matches for him.

5. Breeding a stud is not to be taken lightly. If your dog produces a health problem, you are responsible for it as is the bitch's owner. The stud fee does not waive your responsibility for what your dog produces. Are you prepared to assist with the costs of expensive surgery or reimbursing the purchase price of a pup? If you breed him to your own bitch, you are solely responsible for this. Liver shunt surgery can cost $3,000 or more!
 

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This is from a friend of mine who is far more intelligent than I and wrote me this:

When people monkey around with something of which they have almost no understanding, the results are rarely desirable, and there are no subjects on the planet more complex than gene pool interactions and developmental genetics. The very most intelligent and diligently studied scientists on Earth only have a foggy notion of gene interactions and heritable factors. Very few breeders even understand the most basic genetics. What's worse, in the last 300 years or so, the bulk of dog breeding has focussed on purely irrelevant (genetically) and even outright detrimental traits with little or no consideration for the health of the genome or the viability of the dog as anything but an ornament. Only a handful of breeds have any ability to live in any natural environment, and the number of maladies suffered by purebreds is astounding - and growing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
well i have looked up about breeding i thought i would just ask before i do it i know about hes gene pool both his mom and dad are in show and are vary healthy the vet said he is still to young for some of the test ive heard some bad storys about breeding but not sure if is true i dont have a girl im looking but i think i might buy one but every where i look for a girl they dont have a good gene pool it was vary hard to find peanut and was alot of money...
but i love the breed i want a girl cause you can put lil bows in there hair so0o0o0o cute
 

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You Peanut will be a much better pet and companion if he is neutered rather than used as a stud dog. Consider this from the Humane Society:

Neutered/spayed pets are less aggressive, less likely to fight, and less likely to bite, as documented in studies.

Neutered/spayed pets (especially males) are less territorial and less likely to roam. Research indicates that 80% of dogs hit by cars are unaltered males.

Neutered pets are less likely to mark furniture and rugs with urine.

Spayed females will not have heat cycles that soil rugs and furniture and usually shed less fur.

Neutered pets can't develop testicular tumors, the second most common malignancy in males, and have a lower incidence of prostate cancer, which is better for your pet and means lower medical bills.

Spayed females typically stay healthier and live longer. They have a lower incidence of mammary tumors and no uterine or ovarian cancers, which is better for your pet and means lower medical bills.

Sterilization does not change the pet's personality or cause weight gain.

Removing the urge to mate focuses more of a pet's attention on the caregiver, aiding in training. Sterilized pets behave better.
 

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I agree with Lady's Mom, but then she and I see eye to eye on most things.


If you are absolutely dead set on breeding Peanut after all this advice, then you must find a reputable breeder of Maltese to mentor you before you attempt it. There are so many things to consider, so many things that can happen both physically, psychologically and legally in this area that can only be learned by 1)experience, which is painful and misguided 2) on the job training with a mentor, which is optimum.
 

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I'd also add since you mentioned $$- from all I've read breeders don't make money on the maltese. It's very expensive to breed healthy pups.

Who or what is stopping you from putting bows in Peanut's hair?

Deanne
 

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My question is...why haven't you contacted your breeder? If you have, why isn't she mentoring you? If your pup came from a show breeder (you stated the mom and dad are show dogs), I would think she would be your first resource. You can still have a spayed female and put her hair in bows if you choose. I guess I just don't understand...why would you want to risk the health of you dog(s) just to have a litter of puppies when there are plenty of reputable experienced breeders out there producing healthy, well-adjusted pups? I'm not trying to put you down, I just wanted to know why you are so dead-set on breeding your dog?
 

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If your puppy came from a show breeder, you were either sold a pet quality puppy with a spay/neuter agreement or a show quality pup. A reputable show breeder would be very, very careful where she placed a puppy with that much potential and very often retain some rights over the puppy with a co-ownership agreement. I don't know your background, but from your questions it sounds like you may be a first time Maltese owner. It is very unlikely that a breeder of Maltese truly of the superior quality required to breed would sell a puppy of this caliber to a novice who didn't already show (and win) with Maltese or someone who nothing about breeding.

From everything I can read between the lines, you probably have a sweet little pet quality boy. Intact (un-neutered males dogs) develop pretty hard-to-live with traits, like marking (urinating on vertical surfaces all over your house, etc.) This behavior can start at the age Peanut is now and once started, there is no guarentee that neutering will stop him from marking.

Please get him neutered asap and enjoy him for his companionship and love and leave the breeding to experts. If you want a little girl later on, just buy one from a reputable breeder.

And go ahead and put bows in Peanut's hair! Boys look great in bows, too!
 

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Originally posted by peanut@Jan 27 2005, 10:46 PM
well i have looked up about breeding i thought i would just ask before i do it i know about hes gene pool both his mom and dad are in show and are vary healthy the vet said he is still to young for some of the test ive heard some bad storys about breeding but not sure if is true i dont have a girl im looking but i think i might buy one but every where i look for a girl they dont have a good gene pool it was vary hard to find peanut and was alot of money...
but i love the breed i want a girl cause you can put lil bows in there hair so0o0o0o cute
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Sounds like you got ure mind made up,,,and no matter what we say you are going to breed.
I really dont understand why you cant put a bow in a Boy's hair, but hey doesnt really matter now.

Does youre Breeder know you are going to Breed this Dog????
Most breeder's now days make out spay/neuter contracts before letting their pup go.,,,,,, Sounds like you just woke up one morning and decided to breed this Pup.

Sorry I dont mean to be harsh.....but please make sure YOU know what youre doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Originally posted by Schatzi+Jan 28 2005, 01:57 PM-->
<!--QuoteBegin-peanut
@Jan 27 2005, 10:46 PM
well i have looked up about breeding i thought i would just ask before i do it i know about hes gene pool both his mom and dad are in show and are vary healthy the vet said he is still to young for some of the test ive heard some bad storys about breeding but not sure if is true i dont have a girl im looking but i think i might buy one but every where i look for a girl they dont have a good gene pool it was vary hard to find peanut and was alot of money...
but i love the breed i want a girl cause you can put lil bows in there hair so0o0o0o cute
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Sounds like you got ure mind made up,,,and no matter what we say you are going to breed.
I really dont understand why you cant put a bow in a Boy's hair, but hey doesnt really matter now.

Does youre Breeder know you are going to Breed this Dog????
Most breeder's now days make out spay/neuter contracts before letting their pup go.,,,,,, Sounds like you just woke up one morning and decided to breed this Pup.

Sorry I dont mean to be harsh.....but please make sure YOU know what youre doing.
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im not dead set on it its just would be nice to have lil puppys.. my breeder has just pasted away cause of health problms but she is the one that got me wanting to do this she had high hopes for my peanut cause of his blood line.. but i was wondering should i put him in show instead cause i was looking online and i saw all these maltese that had no homes and made me vary unhappy.. so it did kind of change my mind... i have had a stud before begal but it was the lady that i got him from that was doing the breeding for me so i dont no much i have looked in to it. i no about the test i have to do before i even think about going in to the breeding...
 

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You really should show your dog before you breed him anyway so if you want to show him go ahead and show him. Find a mentor who will take you under their wing. Since your breeder passed away I would find another breeder that shows their dogs and tell them that you want to show Peanut and you would like to learn from them how to do it. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by FannyMay@Feb 9 2005, 10:30 AM
You really should show your dog before you breed him anyway so if you want to show him go ahead and show him.  Find a mentor who will take you under their wing.  Since your breeder passed away I would find another breeder that shows their dogs and tell them that you want to show Peanut and you would like to learn from them how to do it.  Good luck.
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thank you i most likley will put him in show he would be great for it :D
 

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I came across this wonderful article about breeding male dog:

So You Want To Use Your Dog At Stud

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Only the very best males should ever be used at stud. The only reason anyone should breed his animal is to try to improve the breed. A bitch owner can go to any of the top stud dogs in the country. So, what does your dog have to offer?


Has your male been evaluated in the show ring by qualified judges against top competition?
Has he been OFA certified clear of hip and elbow dysplasia?
Have his eyes been checked by a veterinary opthalmologist, who certified him clear of PRA and other hereditary eye defects?
Has he been tested clear of brucellosis?
Is he of the proper temperament?
If you can answer yes to all of the above questions and you are one of the lucky few to own an outstanding dog, are you ready and qualified to handle a stud dog?

Breeding doesn't always happen 1-2-3. Do you have the necessary facilities to board a bitch in season to keep her safely in and the neighbor dogs out? Are you prepared to board a problem bitch or a bitch that the owner just doesn't want around while she is in season because it is too much of a hassle?

Are you prepared to spend sleepless nights with your boarding bitch in season barking and your male pacing and howling?

Are you prepared to handle the problem bitch that doesn't want to be bred and tries to tear your dog to shreds?

Are you qualified to evaluate pedigrees and judge if your dog's five-generation pedigree will complement the bitch's? After all, it's your dog's name and reputation you're passing on to that litter.

Are you qualified to advise the bitch owner on whelping and puppy care? If your dog is bred to a bitch belonging to a novice owner, that owner is going to expect you to have all the answers. Do you have a ready market for offspring of your stud dog to help the bitch owner place the litter? (This is usually achieved by showing your dog and having him become well known. A lot of time and money must be put into your dog if you want to get anything back.)

Have you seen many bitches in season at all, and can you tell when it is best to breed the bitch?

Have you ever assisted in a breeding, or even seen one so you will know what you have to do? Do you realize that its more than putting the two dogs in an area together? Do you realize that leaving a dog and a bitch in season alone together can be disastrous and may even physically harm both?

Are you prepared for the change in your male's temperament? Once he's been used for stud, that will become the only thing on his mind. Or are you prepared for the wear and tear on your stud dog ... his not eating, pacing and constant whining will not be easy to cope with.


As you can see, its not all that easy. Please think about it.
 
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